Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 86719 times)

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Offline amw

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #380 on: August 13, 2019, 12:09:49 AM »
Something that I noticed, and idk if it's in line with the actual no. of movements in the symphony, but Nos. 2 & 3, in the Svetlanov recordings, are both cast in two movements. In No. 2, they are 20 and 25 minutes respectively, and in No. 3, 13 and 33 minutes. Making the "finale" (?) of No. 3 one of the longer movements in the symphonic repertoire.
No. 3 is in two movements of 20 and 25 minutes each. No. 2 is in three movements (Allegro, Molto sostenuto, Allegro con fuoco) with the middle movement being the longest; the movement break is pretty obvious when you listen to the recording. In any case the Symphony-Ballade (No. 22) is even longer, and a single unbroken movement, at about 36 minutes.

I honestly don't have a problem with listening to the Myaskovsky symphonies in order although my favourites tend to be in the first half of his output (3, 5, 10, 11, 13)

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #381 on: August 13, 2019, 12:17:11 AM »
No. 3 is in two movements of 20 and 25 minutes each. No. 2 is in three movements (Allegro, Molto sostenuto, Allegro con fuoco) with the middle movement being the longest; the movement break is pretty obvious when you listen to the recording. In any case the Symphony-Ballade (No. 22) is even longer, and a single unbroken movement, at about 36 minutes.

I honestly don't have a problem with listening to the Myaskovsky symphonies in order although my favourites tend to be in the first half of his output (3, 5, 10, 11, 13)

Although I only included 3 (which I rate very highly) in my list above I also like 5 and 11 and am just getting to appreciate the more modernist (IMO) 13 which is included on the new Naxos release.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline amw

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #382 on: August 13, 2019, 12:38:20 AM »
Although I only included 3 (which I rate very highly) in my list above I also like 5 and 11 and am just getting to appreciate the more modernist (IMO) 13 which is included on the new Naxos release.
No. 3 is a symphony in the mold of Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy, although in my view Myaskovsky's craftsmanship exceeds Scriabin's even if his ideas may be less brilliant. The final funeral march is my favourite passage among his symphonies I think.

Nos. 5 and 11 are very "Russian school" a la the Mighty Kuchka, in an updated, more modern style, and both have beautiful slow movements. To be honest the slow movements are pretty consistently the best parts of Myaskovsky's symphonies, from No.1 to No.27 (the latter with Myaskovsky's favourite elevato marking). 10 and 13 are his other major attempts at the Scriabinesque style and probably his most individual works.

I will admit to also really enjoying the symphony for wind band (No. 19) and probably a few of the other later ones that aren't coming to mind right away, but they are certainly much more "neoclassical".

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #383 on: August 13, 2019, 02:59:06 AM »
No. 3 is a symphony in the mold of Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy, although in my view Myaskovsky's craftsmanship exceeds Scriabin's even if his ideas may be less brilliant. The final funeral march is my favourite passage among his symphonies I think.

Nos. 5 and 11 are very "Russian school" a la the Mighty Kuchka, in an updated, more modern style, and both have beautiful slow movements. To be honest the slow movements are pretty consistently the best parts of Myaskovsky's symphonies, from No.1 to No.27 (the latter with Myaskovsky's favourite elevato marking). 10 and 13 are his other major attempts at the Scriabinesque style and probably his most individual works.

I will admit to also really enjoying the symphony for wind band (No. 19) and probably a few of the other later ones that aren't coming to mind right away, but they are certainly much more "neoclassical".

Yes, that last movement of Symphony No.3 is quite something, ending in the deepest gloom, something which always appeals to me. It's sometimes compared to the symphony by Cesar Frank.  I really like the version for string orchestra ('Two Pieces for Strings' I think) of the middle movements of Symphony 19. Do you know that version? I'm really getting to appreciate Symphony 13 at the moment although I haven't (yet) bought the new Naxos CD.

Here's the Two Pieces for Strings. I wish I'd bought that fine old EMI/Melodiya LP when it first came out:
https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=E68o0xf0evA
I find the opening piece very moving and entirely characteristic of the composer.
« Last Edit: August 13, 2019, 03:04:31 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #384 on: August 15, 2019, 01:31:56 AM »
I was very pleased to find this online: 'Kremlin by Night' (1947). Much as I love the music of this composer, apart from the choral end of Symphony No.6, I don't think that I have heard any of his choral music, which seems largely unknown. I can't find any CD or LP featuring it. It's quite a concise work (20 mins) but I found it enchanting, sections of it reminded me of Vaughan Williams and Rachmaninov's 'The Bells' as well as Boris Godonov:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #385 on: August 15, 2019, 03:40:10 PM »
I was very pleased to find this online: 'Kremlin by Night' (1947). Much as I love the music of this composer, apart from the choral end of Symphony No.6, I don't think that I have heard any of his choral music, which seems largely unknown. I can't find any CD or LP featuring it. It's quite a concise work (20 mins) but I found it enchanting, sections of it reminded me of Vaughan Williams and Rachmaninov's 'The Bells' as well as Boris Godonov:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

This rarity has drawn my attention. I'm gonna check it later. Thanks for sharing it, Jeffrey! The sound quality is decent, fortunately! Checking the comments on the video, there is another rare piece by him: Kirov is with us.

<a href="http://www.youtube.com/v/cQSyQgvgYfM" target="_blank" class="new_win">http://www.youtube.com/v/cQSyQgvgYfM</a>

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #386 on: August 31, 2019, 10:40:07 AM »
New release of Complete Symphonies:
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #387 on: September 01, 2019, 11:14:10 AM »
IMHO Symphony n 27 is a masterwork .Its triumphal ending isn't forced as DSCH but is the answer of composer towards illness and
death .I love Fifth of Shebalin for the same reason.
« Last Edit: September 01, 2019, 11:18:22 AM by Roy Bland »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #388 on: September 03, 2019, 01:33:23 AM »
IMHO Symphony n 27 is a masterwork .Its triumphal ending isn't forced as DSCH but is the answer of composer towards illness and
death .I love Fifth of Shebalin for the same reason.
I'm totally with you on both counts here. The slow movement of Symphony 27th is one of the most moving I know and I see the finale as a joyous celebration of life; as if Miaskovsky, after the winter, is welcoming the return of spring in full knowledge that he would not be there to see it. Shebalin's 5th Symphony has a sad eloquence which I also find very moving.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #389 on: October 04, 2019, 02:00:18 AM »
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #390 on: October 04, 2019, 03:51:29 AM »
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.

The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort. 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #391 on: October 04, 2019, 03:52:06 AM »
Bought the recent Naxos recording of Symphonies Nos. 1 & 13. Listening to No. 13 right now.

I just realized now that Marco Polo released a decent number of Myaskovsky symphony recordings back in the day. I'm curious whether this Naxos cycle (assuming it is to be a cycle and this isn't just a one-off release) will give us new recordings of all 27 symphonies or whether they'll just reissue/remaster the Marco Polo recordings, filling the gaps with new recordings.

I don't think that any of those Marco Polo releases have been transferred to Naxos. The releases of symphonies 1, 13, 24 and 25 are new recordings. I hope that the fine Ural Youth Orchestra go on to record more of the Miaskovsky symphonies. I'm sorry that Kondrashin only recorded symphonies 6 and 15 as far as I'm aware as those performances are in a class of their own IMO although I also rate Alexander Gauk's recordings of symphonies 17 (dedicated to Gauk I think), 19 and 27 (annoyingly never released on CD - it is the most moving of all).
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #392 on: October 04, 2019, 03:53:16 AM »
The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort.
Yes, that's a fine CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #393 on: October 04, 2019, 04:11:42 AM »
The recording on Marco Polo of Symphonies 5 & 9 (BBC Phil, Edward Downes) is a must. The 9th in particular is a much better interpretation than Svetlanov's plodding, uninspired effort.

Ooh, OK! I never expected a glowing recommendation here. Early Marco Polo/Naxos is very hit and miss, by most accounts. I'll keep this in mind.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #394 on: October 04, 2019, 10:09:37 AM »
Ooh, OK! I never expected a glowing recommendation here. Early Marco Polo/Naxos is very hit and miss, by most accounts. I'll keep this in mind.

I enjoyed Stankovsky's version of Symphony 6 on Marco Polo - very underrated I think:
« Last Edit: October 04, 2019, 10:11:12 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).