Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 91504 times)

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Offline Daverz

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #400 on: January 14, 2020, 11:31:37 AM »
Jeffrey: I have not come across Veronika Dudarova before. Has he only conducted the 11th?

She also recorded Symphony No. 6.  This recording includes the chorus, which was omitted in the Svetlanov recording.



https://www.amazon.com/Symphony-6-Myaskovsky/dp/B000003W9T


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #401 on: January 14, 2020, 11:52:36 AM »
She also recorded Symphony No. 6.  This recording includes the chorus, which was omitted in the Svetlanov recording.



https://www.amazon.com/Symphony-6-Myaskovsky/dp/B000003W9T

Yes, Daverz is right. Her recording of Symphony No.6 is solid enough but I think that the Stankovsky on Marco Polo is better.   I've always thought that was a rather underrated performance. Nothing wrong with the Dudarova and it is usually available much more cheaply than the old Olympia Svetlanov series (now reissued in the Alto boxed set). Best of all is Kondrashin's earlier performance shortly to be reissued on Alto.
« Last Edit: January 14, 2020, 11:57:44 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #402 on: January 15, 2020, 12:44:30 AM »
Fair enough. I used downloads some years back on e-music as a cheap discovery tool but always been keener on CD myself, although at that price, Myaskovsky, who i don't know the music of at all, is a cheap temptation. Which symphonies should I sample first to have a good idea of his sound ?

FYI, the set is only slightly dearer on AMZ UK at £39 - £40 New.

Jeffrey is the one to answer that.

On order. Excellent deal for fourteen CDs.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Daverz

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #403 on: January 15, 2020, 05:24:37 AM »
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ</a>

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html
« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 05:32:22 AM by Daverz »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #404 on: January 15, 2020, 09:56:43 AM »
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ</a>

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html
Thanks. They are both good but the earlier one is very special IMO. Above all the crucial flute episode in the Trio of the Scherzo is taken much too fast in the later recording which, in my opinion, robs it of its impact.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #405 on: January 15, 2020, 10:01:24 AM »
Fair enough. I used downloads some years back on e-music as a cheap discovery tool but always been keener on CD myself, although at that price, Myaskovsky, who i don't know the music of at all, is a cheap temptation. Which symphonies should I sample first to have a good idea of his sound ?

FYI, the set is only slightly dearer on AMZ UK at £39 - £40 New.
Greetings Olivier!

I would suggest symphonies 3,5,6,8 (slow movement), 11, 12, 13 (more modernist), 15, 16 and 17 (all excellent) 21 (possibly the finest along with 6 and 17), 21-25 and 27 ( a very moving, valedictory work written under the shadow of death). I'd start with 21 which is most concise, poetic and approachable. There is a fine old Unicorn CD which it is usually possible to pick up cheaply, second-hand, online:

PS I note that I've recommended sixteen of them! Let's narrow it down further (3,6, 15, 17, 21, 23, which is very tuneful and approachable, 24, 27).
« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 10:18:58 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #406 on: January 15, 2020, 11:33:33 AM »
Greetings Olivier!

I would suggest symphonies 3,5,6,8 (slow movement), 11, 12, 13 (more modernist), 15, 16 and 17 (all excellent) 21 (possibly the finest along with 6 and 17), 21-25 and 27 ( a very moving, valedictory work written under the shadow of death). I'd start with 21 which is most concise, poetic and approachable. There is a fine old Unicorn CD which it is usually possible to pick up cheaply, second-hand, online:

PS I note that I've recommended sixteen of them! Let's narrow it down further (3,6, 15, 17, 21, 23, which is very tuneful and approachable, 24, 27).

Thank you Jeffrey for the numerous recommendations. I'll check some in due course.
Olivier

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #407 on: January 15, 2020, 11:12:36 PM »
Thank you Jeffrey for the numerous recommendations. I'll check some in due course.
Your very welcome Olivier. Apart from the symphonies I'd recommend the Cello Concerto, Violin Concerto, String Quartet 13, the Sonatine and Piano Sonata No.5. Sadly his cantata 'The Kremlin by Night' has never been released on a recording as far as I'm aware although it is on You Tube:

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

« Last Edit: January 15, 2020, 11:15:09 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #408 on: January 20, 2020, 06:07:41 AM »
There were two Kondrashin recordings of Symphony No. 6, 1959 (mono) and 1978 (stereo):



<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/woVMQmNvOdo</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ" target="_blank" class="new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/dRbZTMoMUoQ</a>

Quite a difference in timings.

Here's a comparison of some recordings on Musicweb:

http://www.musicweb-international.com/classrev/2001/Dec01/Miaskovsky6.htm

And a review of the Kondrashin 1978:

https://classicalmjourney.blogspot.com/2018/02/nikolai-myaskovsky-symphony-no-6-kirill.html

February 2020 release:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #409 on: January 21, 2020, 12:53:30 AM »
Miaskovsky: 3rd Symphony.



There is so much to look out for in the 3rd, not least the subterranean bass of the opening which later makes reappearances. Every discussion on Russian orchestras always comments on "fruity" brass (yawn), well, listen to the delicacy of the string playing during a magical peacefull interlude of an otherwise mostly turbulent symphony at the end of the first movement. The Tchaikovsky -ish melody of the second movement (half really). I love a funeral march, and there is a great one to finish the work off - who for though? The 3rd does seem to my ears a program symphony, and 1914 were grave times in Russia and Europe as a whole. The excellent notes claim Miaskovsky was suffering depression when he composed the 3rd so my guess is that this quite long funeral march that stutters to a close, is for himself.

A mention of the sonics as Russian recordings can be iffy. This is very fine and well done to Paul Arden-Taylor who has achieved a fine mastering result for Alto. My only slight concern is that this 3rd is one of only a few of the set that Svetlanov recorded in the 1960's the main body of the set are DDD recordings from the 1990's. Fingers crossed the later recordings are at least as good. I will soon be finding out! 
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 01:03:44 AM by Irons »
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Daverz

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #410 on: January 21, 2020, 01:04:43 AM »
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:

« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 01:06:15 AM by Daverz »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #411 on: January 21, 2020, 01:46:35 AM »
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:



That's very tempting I must say.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #412 on: January 21, 2020, 01:52:22 AM »
Miaskovsky: 3rd Symphony.



There is so much to look out for in the 3rd, not least the subterranean bass of the opening which later makes reappearances. Every discussion on Russian orchestras always comments on "fruity" brass (yawn), well, listen to the delicacy of the string playing during a magical peacefull interlude of an otherwise mostly turbulent symphony at the end of the first movement. The Tchaikovsky -ish melody of the second movement (half really). I love a funeral march, and there is a great one to finish the work off - who for though? The 3rd does seem to my ears a program symphony, and 1914 were grave times in Russia and Europe as a whole. The excellent notes claim Miaskovsky was suffering depression when he composed the 3rd so my guess is that this quite long funeral march that stutters to a close, is for himself.

A mention of the sonics as Russian recordings can be iffy. This is very fine and well done to Paul Arden-Taylor who has achieved a fine mastering result for Alto. My only slight concern is that this 3rd is one of only a few of the set that Svetlanov recorded in the 1960's the main body of the set are DDD recordings from the 1990's. Fingers crossed the later recordings are at least as good. I will soon be finding out!
I like your analysis of the fine 3rd Symphony Lol. It was one of the first that I got to know, borrowed from the record library. I record my moody late adolescent or early twenties self listening to it over and over again. I seem to recall that the LP notes referred to the 'hero' of the symphony as a noble spirit doomed to disappointment and frustration.'  I'm sure you're right that the hero is Miaskovsky himself, by all accounts a noble and shy individual. That final funeral march ending in nothingness is very powerful.
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 07:36:20 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Irons

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #413 on: January 21, 2020, 07:20:26 AM »
Don't forget the recent reissue of the string quartets in a box:



I do have most if not all the string quartets on LP. It is through the encouragement of Jeffrey that I have set out on a symphony odyssey.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline J

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #414 on: January 21, 2020, 06:17:28 PM »
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.

Offline Daverz

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #415 on: January 21, 2020, 06:29:35 PM »
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.

It's in this set and sounds fantastic on CD.



I'll also note that the old Ormandy mono recording has made it to CD and digital streaming as part of Sony's Gyorgy Sandor box (since it was coupled with Sandor's Bartok PC3 on LP).



« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 06:34:14 PM by Daverz »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #416 on: January 21, 2020, 11:22:34 PM »
A strong candidate for finest of all Miaskovsky Symphony recordings has to be Morton Gould & the Chicago SO's performance of No.21, - the easy present availability of which is unknown by me, however.

I agree with Greg - it's a very fine performance. I have the Morton Gould box.

This is another fine version of Symphony 21:

'The Art of Eugene Ormandy' 2 CD set on the Biddulph label.

The Gould box reproduces the original, exotic LP sleeve which I like:
« Last Edit: January 21, 2020, 11:27:35 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline J

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #417 on: January 22, 2020, 09:30:59 AM »
Credit to Gould, of course, - but in my mind what this recording shows more than anything is how marvelous the really elite Orchestras could likely make many other of Miaskovsky's scores sound were they given the opportunity.
« Last Edit: January 22, 2020, 05:54:01 PM by J »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #418 on: January 22, 2020, 09:40:45 AM »
Credit to Gould, of course, - but in my mind what this recording shows more than anything is how marvelous the really elite Orchestras could likely make many more of Miaskovsky's scores sound were they given the opportunity.
Yes, and of course Symphony No.21 was written for the Chicago SO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #419 on: January 23, 2020, 06:22:09 AM »
I picked up a disc of Myaskovsky works, mainly for chamber orchestra today. Serenade, Op. 32/1, Sinfonietta, Op. 32/2, Lyric Concertino, Op. 32/3 and Salutatory Overture, Op. 48

I'm curious what connect those three Opus 32 works, for them to be collected together like this. They're all scored for different ensembles, so it can't be that.