Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 148608 times)

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #760 on: June 22, 2021, 09:28:26 AM »
I think that he's working on it Karl.

Groovy, thanks.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #761 on: June 22, 2021, 09:29:53 AM »
I admire your commitment to the research, Karl  8)

It's my native curiosity plus the positive reinforcement of having found highly rewarding listening already, Fergus.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #762 on: June 22, 2021, 11:21:16 AM »
Good for you, Karl.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #763 on: June 22, 2021, 11:46:40 AM »
Good for you, Karl.

I also think of Jacob, wrestling with the angel: I will not let thee go except thou bless me.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #764 on: June 22, 2021, 12:06:17 PM »
I also think of Jacob, wrestling with the angel: I will not let thee go except thou bless me.

The blessing will only come when you have completed the task  ;)  ;D
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #765 on: June 25, 2021, 07:13:40 PM »
Cross-posted from the ‘Listening’ thread:

NP:

Myaskovsky
Symphony No. 27 in C minor, Op. 85
Russian Federation Academic SO
Svetlanov




This is thrilling! While I acknowledge the criticisms of a few members here about this composer, revisiting this symphony has softened my own criticisms about the music. This rekindling of a spark may very well inspire me to plough through this set again, but, this time, I’ll take my time and try to absorb the music in a more observant fashion. I bought this reissued set on Alto as my older set on Warner had some glitches that must have been either bad transfers or defective CD pressings. This Alto set seems to have cleared up this issue as it uses the masters from Olympia.

I think I, too, have caught ‘Myaskovsky fever’ again.  0:) As for Kyle’s criticism, I don’t hear it and I certainly don’t hear it in the 27th. I hear many different splashes of color and the whole writing in the middle register is a silly assertion. I hear the high, mid and low registers perfectly fine in his music. You may want to check your audio equipment! Anyway, his opinion makes no difference, this is heartbreakingly beautiful music and I think anyone with an ear for Soviet Era composers that want to venture outside Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Weinberg et. al. would do well to pursue this music. I remember Symphonies Nos. 24 & 27 making a huge impression on me when I first heard them years ago (probably around 2008 or so). I should also give a listen to his SQs (I own the Taneyev Quartet’s set) and I’ve heard a few of them, but I don’t remember them too well. The Piano Sonatas I will also be giving a listen to as I bought the McLachlan recording on Alto (?) last year or so. I also love his Cello Concerto and Cello Sonatas. I still haven’t heard all of the orchestral works outside of the symphonies, but I have bought three discs last year that, for me, act as a continuation of the symphony set. I’ve got to hear these works, too.
« Last Edit: June 25, 2021, 07:19:23 PM by Mirror Image »
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #766 on: June 25, 2021, 07:47:47 PM »
The box of the string quartets landed today.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #767 on: June 25, 2021, 07:53:45 PM »
The box of the string quartets landed today.

Cool, Karl. Which iteration of the symphony set did you buy? The older one on Warner France or the Alto one?
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #768 on: June 25, 2021, 10:36:19 PM »
We badly need a recording of the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night'.

In the meantime here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs
« Last Edit: June 25, 2021, 10:38:55 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline aligreto

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #769 on: June 26, 2021, 01:46:59 AM »
We badly need a recording of the cantata 'The Kremlin at Night'.

In the meantime here it is:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=U5MMQpLaKJs

I have just listened to that video, Jeffrey. It is a very fine work indeed. Thank you for posting it.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #770 on: June 26, 2021, 03:22:52 AM »
I have just listened to that video, Jeffrey. It is a very fine work indeed. Thank you for posting it.
My pleasure Fergus. I'm surprised that it's never been recorded before. It could be usefully coupled with his other cantata 'Kirov is Amongst Us'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #771 on: June 26, 2021, 12:16:11 PM »
Cool, Karl. Which iteration of the symphony set did you buy? The older one on Warner France or the Alto one?

Not clear to me, John, I got it as a download. The digital booklet does read Alto.

(* additional info *)
« Last Edit: June 26, 2021, 12:21:25 PM by k a rl h e nn i ng »
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #772 on: June 26, 2021, 05:40:34 PM »
Not clear to me, John, I got it as a download. The digital booklet does read Alto.

(* additional info *)

Very good. Looks like you’ve got the good set then. ;)
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #773 on: July 03, 2021, 12:21:03 PM »
The box of the string quartets landed today.

Well, I was going to listen through the quartets before hitting the symphonies, but now that I've organized the symphony sound files all tidy, the temptation is too great, I suppose. I am plunging in with the Sixth and will work my way backwards to the First over the next few days.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
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http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #774 on: July 04, 2021, 10:40:37 AM »
The blessing will only come when you have completed the task  ;) ;D

Okay, in support of my earlier objection, which I now formally withdraw: I'm listening to the Fifth Symphony today. I believe this was the symphony I began listening to, back when. The first movement, Allegretto amabile largely constrains itself within the middle register ambit, and the scoring for most of the movement is less colorful than in the symphonies which first won my affection, indeed, the color is markedly more restrained than in the Sixth, which was part of yesterday's listening. So, on one hand, I'll stand by the observation that the writing here is sombre compared to any of a dozen other Russian symphonies, and my guess is that I bridled at this and did not trouble to listen to the rest of the symphony (hence began listening to, earlier.) Chalk that up to my impatience at the time, which I do not seek to excuse.  Now, I understand that the sombre palette was a choice and not a limitation. Thus let my objection pass into oblivion.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Online foxandpeng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #775 on: July 04, 2021, 11:55:44 AM »
Okay, in support of my earlier objection, which I now formally withdraw: I'm listening to the Fifth Symphony today. I believe this was the symphony I began listening to, back when. The first movement, Allegretto amabile largely constrains itself within the middle register ambit, and the scoring for most of the movement is less colorful than in the symphonies which first won my affection, indeed, the color is markedly more restrained than in the Sixth, which was part of yesterday's listening. So, on one hand, I'll stand by the observation that the writing here is sombre compared to any of a dozen other Russian symphonies, and my guess is that I bridled at this and did not trouble to listen to the rest of the symphony (hence began listening to, earlier.) Chalk that up to my impatience at the time, which I do not seek to excuse.  Now, I understand that the sombre palette was a choice and not a limitation. Thus let my objection pass into oblivion.

If sharing your reflections as you go is ever useful, then some of us lesser mortals would value your insights 😁
“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #776 on: July 04, 2021, 12:04:09 PM »
If sharing your reflections as you go is ever useful, then some of us lesser mortals would value your insights 😁

I'll try to do my best.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #777 on: July 04, 2021, 12:52:02 PM »
I'll try to do my best.

I was actually being cheeky and not expecting you to take the bait, but I'd be really pleased to read your reflections, as doubtless, would others.

Thank you 🙂
“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #778 on: July 22, 2021, 04:12:40 PM »
If it should perhaps strike you as odd that quartets nos. 9-11 should be on CD1 ... I can report that with the exception of CD2 all five discs in this set are labeled CD1 ....
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #779 on: August 10, 2021, 10:12:28 PM »
I was just reading BBC Music Magazine and was pleased to read that NYM is their featured 'Composer of the Month' in the October issue.
« Last Edit: August 11, 2021, 05:12:56 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).