Author Topic: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)  (Read 71638 times)

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Offline MusicTurner

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #420 on: April 01, 2020, 01:27:05 PM »
I find it fascinating how it's only larger places that get translated into other languages. It's a sign of which places are important enough to have registered on the consciousness of other nations.

As far as I can tell, the only Danish locality that gets an English name is Copenhagen (and after learning Danish I do sometimes have to consciously tell myself to go with Copenhagen and not København because no-one is going to know what I'm talking about, unless I'm talking to a Dane).

Everything smaller just gets its own name, although I'm sure that in some cases the pronunciation will be wildly different (I didn't pronounce Odense remotely correctly).

(....)

I think you are right, a few other Danish places have English-version names though:

Elsinore/Helsingør (once a major customs site) and the country's 3 major geographical regions: Funen/Fyn island, Zealand/Sjælland island, Jutland/Jylland mainland.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 11:38:18 PM by MusicTurner »

Offline Madiel

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #421 on: April 01, 2020, 08:05:19 PM »
All true! Somehow I didn't think of any of those at the time.

I was mostly thinking of cities. I should at least have thought of Elsinore, though really that's purely through Hamlet and most English-speakers probably don't even realise it's a real place. But as I've actually been there I should have thought of it.
« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 08:06:51 PM by Madiel »
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Offline MusicTurner

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #422 on: April 01, 2020, 10:31:21 PM »
For us locals, it's quite interesting that Rachmaninoff stayed in Copenhagen for almost a year from January 1918, while also doing tours in Scandinavia.

Danish Wiki has some information about it; one might use Google Translate https://da.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergej_Rachmaninov

Rachmaninoff was staying in the upscale, northern Charlottenlund area, in Ingeborgvej street, paying rent at a Lieutenant Jering's place and borrowing his piano. His daughters would frequent the local school, and the music editor Wilhelm Hansen helped him organize practical and musical matters and concerts.

Later, he stayed at Skovvej near Jægersborg Alle street, in the same area. But then the Spanish Flu came and prevented any further official arrangements, making him decide to go to the US in November 1918.

« Last Edit: April 01, 2020, 10:54:10 PM by MusicTurner »

Offline Madiel

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #423 on: April 01, 2020, 11:18:23 PM »
Oh interesting. The English wikipedia does mention this, though not so extensively.
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Offline amw

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #424 on: April 01, 2020, 11:19:39 PM »
I might spend some time with the Howard Shelley complete piano works box in the coming days. I've never found his solo music easy to get into but might as well try.

Offline Florestan

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #425 on: April 02, 2020, 02:55:30 AM »
I might spend some time with the Howard Shelley complete piano works box in the coming days.

Quite possibly the best op. 23/5 I've ever listened to.
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Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #426 on: February 18, 2021, 08:33:41 AM »
Listening again to the marvelous 1st symphony (Ashkenazy/RCO).

Oh how I love this symphony. For sure my favourite Rachmaninoff symphony and also my favourite work of his, period.

The coda of this symphony is so bloody fantastic, and even more so when witnessed in a live performance. I just saw someone online comment that the coda of this symphony reminded him of a large ocean liner sinking into the ocean.  :o I kinda like that!  :D
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Offline Benji

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #427 on: February 18, 2021, 09:04:03 AM »
Listening again to the marvelous 1st symphony (Ashkenazy/RCO).

Oh how I love this symphony. For sure my favourite Rachmaninoff symphony and also my favourite work of his, period.

The coda of this symphony is so bloody fantastic, and even more so when witnessed in a live performance. I just saw someone online comment that the coda of this symphony reminded him of a large ocean liner sinking into the ocean.  :o I kinda like that!  :D

They should pair the work in concert with John Adams' Harmonielehre in the second half.

Sorry, very obscure joke ... Maybe someone will get it  :laugh:

Offline Benji

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #428 on: February 18, 2021, 09:18:20 AM »
I've been happily listening to a new recording of Respighi's orchestrations of the Etudes Tableaux on Spotify. It would be nice to have the liner notes to hand - I can't seem to find a decent answer online about how this came about.

I gather they were a commission and that Rachmaninov provided Respighi with some notes on his inspirations. I suppose my questions are why didn't Rach orchestrate them himself, and why was Respighi approached to orchestrate another successful living composer's work in 1930, which is 2 years after the completion of his successful Roman trilogy?

Not that it matters I'm just curious!

The first etude is excellent in the orchestration - very reminiscent of Isle of the Dead with the prominent dies irae motif.

Offline relm1

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #429 on: February 19, 2021, 07:18:49 AM »
Listening again to the marvelous 1st symphony (Ashkenazy/RCO).

Oh how I love this symphony. For sure my favourite Rachmaninoff symphony and also my favourite work of his, period.

The coda of this symphony is so bloody fantastic, and even more so when witnessed in a live performance. I just saw someone online comment that the coda of this symphony reminded him of a large ocean liner sinking into the ocean.  :o I kinda like that!  :D

Just yesterday I listened to the new Philadelphia recording of this work on DG, it's an excellent performance too.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #430 on: February 22, 2021, 05:19:26 AM »
Listening again to the marvelous 1st symphony (Ashkenazy/RCO).

Oh how I love this symphony. For sure my favourite Rachmaninoff symphony and also my favourite work of his, period.

The coda of this symphony is so bloody fantastic, and even more so when witnessed in a live performance. I just saw someone online comment that the coda of this symphony reminded him of a large ocean liner sinking into the ocean.  :o I kinda like that!  :D
+1
I listened to the fine old Ormandy performance the other day. The new DGG is on my wish-list.
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Offline Cato

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #431 on: February 23, 2021, 04:00:59 PM »
+1
I listened to the fine old Ormandy performance the other day. The new DGG is on my wish-list.

I would love to find the stereo Ormandy - Philadelphia recording of The Isle of the Dead !
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Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #432 on: March 05, 2021, 09:29:45 AM »
Just finished listening to the debut recital of Emre Yavuz.  Nothing if not brave he plays his own hybrid version of the Piano Sonata No.2 and the 10 Preludes Op.23.  Goodness me this is stunning provocative playing.  Pushing expressive and musical boundaries to the limit.  Very personal indeed, quite probably not to everyone's taste but I loved it!  Bravo Mr Yavuz.  A pounds the table, stands and cheers kind of disc!


Offline kyjo

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #433 on: Today at 09:51:28 AM »
Just yesterday I listened to the new Philadelphia recording of this work on DG, it's an excellent performance too.

+1 It’s a great performance, not quite as “demonic” as some but still very exciting and beautifully played and recorded. Once again I’m awestruck by the ingenious motivic unity of the work. Rachmaninoff’s subsequent works became more lushly romantic but not quite as tightly and succinctly written - just an observation, not a criticism!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #434 on: Today at 11:12:39 AM »
Listening again to the marvelous 1st symphony (Ashkenazy/RCO).

Oh how I love this symphony. For sure my favourite Rachmaninoff symphony and also my favourite work of his, period.

The coda of this symphony is so bloody fantastic, and even more so when witnessed in a live performance. I just saw someone online comment that the coda of this symphony reminded him of a large ocean liner sinking into the ocean.  :o I kinda like that!  :D

More likely it is Anna Karenina crushed by a train and dragged into hell. Rachmaninoff had met Tolstoy and borrowed the epigram from the eponymous novel for the title page of the symphony.

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Sergei Rachmaninov (1873-1943)
« Reply #435 on: Today at 11:20:16 AM »
I've been happily listening to a new recording of Respighi's orchestrations of the Etudes Tableaux on Spotify. It would be nice to have the liner notes to hand - I can't seem to find a decent answer online about how this came about.

I gather they were a commission and that Rachmaninov provided Respighi with some notes on his inspirations. I suppose my questions are why didn't Rach orchestrate them himself, and why was Respighi approached to orchestrate another successful living composer's work in 1930, which is 2 years after the completion of his successful Roman trilogy?

Not that it matters I'm just curious!

The first etude is excellent in the orchestration - very reminiscent of Isle of the Dead with the prominent dies irae motif.

I think Respighi's project was ill-conceived and executed. He picked some of the least appropriate etudes to orchestrate and he didn't do a very good job of it. Rachmaninoff was likely happy with the piano versions and would have realized that some of the ones Respighi picked were too pianistic to be worth orchestrating. Also, the Ricordi score and parts for these works are riddled with mistakes. I had to apend a week proof reading the materials for a performance by the Cincinnati Orchestra.