Author Topic: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972  (Read 21985 times)

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kyjo

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #60 on: August 20, 2013, 03:08:33 PM »
There is so much to discover, that it is sometimes difficult not to run around like a loon pointing at stuff and being excited. At the same time, more than ever before, I am aware of how little I know. This is rarely a bad thing, as humility is a useful trait.

Thanks. :) Yes, this forum is positively bursting with activity, especially with my jabberwocky self constantly hanging around! :D

Offline BrianSA

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #61 on: August 22, 2013, 05:34:33 PM »
Just out of curiosity, does anybody know exactly how unfinished Popov's seventh symphony is?

Offline relm1

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #62 on: January 16, 2019, 04:55:55 PM »
This is a very fine new recording of Popov's excellent Symphony No. 1. 

https://music.yandex.ru/album/4778394

I'm sure anyone viewing this page is already familiar with this work, but it is sort of like a 45 minute sprawling version of Scriabin's Poem of Ecstasy as interpreted by Shostakovich.  In fact, it uses similar orchestral forces such as 4.4.4.4/8.4.3.1/2timp+5perc (minimum)/2 harps, celesta, strings.  What's not to like?  This new recording is from a live performance and played flawlessly, full of details, very good intensity *cough* not Leon Botstein *cough*, and well performed/recorded.

Offline André

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #63 on: January 16, 2019, 05:55:40 PM »
That makes 3 versions of the 1st symphony, then. I wish this Exton release was available on cd (appears to be mp3 only).

Meanwhile, the 4th symphony (choral) seems never to have been recorded.

Offline relm1

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #64 on: January 17, 2019, 07:08:48 AM »
That makes 3 versions of the 1st symphony, then. I wish this Exton release was available on cd (appears to be mp3 only).

Meanwhile, the 4th symphony (choral) seems never to have been recorded.

I think this is the fourth recording.  Others are:
* Leon Botstein
* Alexander Titov
* Gennady Provatorov
* This new one

Hopefully No. 4 gets a premiere recording soon and I would love the unfinished No. 7 too.

Offline André

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #65 on: January 17, 2019, 07:11:32 AM »
You’re right. I didn’t know about the Titov recording.

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #66 on: January 18, 2019, 07:45:28 AM »
and I would love the unfinished No. 7 too.

Depends how finished it is, I guess. Or would you want someone to make a completion/performing version of the symphony?

Offline relm1

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #67 on: January 18, 2019, 08:46:51 AM »
Depends how finished it is, I guess. Or would you want someone to make a completion/performing version of the symphony?

I wouldn't mind a completion but you're right, depends to what extent/quality the score is.  I've seen some incomplete works where at least one movement is fully completed but the second is barely there - just an idea or two.  The first movement should be heard.  But the second would really be the work of someone else taking an idea from the original composer which is probably less interesting to me unless they had some understanding of what was intended (eg: Bruckner 9th 4th movement).  Of course Mahler is the great example of work that was practically complete that not entirely orchestrated and was very convincingly completed into a performance version. 

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #68 on: March 07, 2019, 12:07:38 PM »
I've been revisiting the recorded symphonies (I really miss a recording of the 4th!), and I'm pretty impressed (again) by them. Popov was noticeably creative and gifted of an unquestionable musical talent. At least I haven't heard any weak symphony by him. Now I'm finishing listening to the 5th Pastoral. It's just brilliant, and as its title says, it has a pastoral mood, blended with some late-romantic passages of important beauty and heroic moments. Something to notice too is the fine orchestration that conveys the colourful canvas in all its splendour. It's easily a masterpiece imho.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #69 on: March 07, 2019, 02:26:30 PM »
I've been revisiting the recorded symphonies (I really miss a recording of the 4th!), and I'm pretty impressed (again) by them. Popov was noticeably creative and gifted of an unquestionable musical talent. At least I haven't heard any weak symphony by him. Now I'm finishing listening to the 5th Pastoral. It's just brilliant, and as its title says, it has a pastoral mood, blended with some late-romantic passages of important beauty and heroic moments. Something to notice too is the fine orchestration that conveys the colourful canvas in all its splendour. It's easily a masterpiece imho.
Don't know the 'Pastoral' so well but I have the strongest opinion of 1, especially the Olympia recording, 2 'Motherland' and 6. All terrific IMO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #70 on: March 07, 2019, 05:39:51 PM »
Don't know the 'Pastoral' so well but I have the strongest opinion of 1, especially the Olympia recording, 2 'Motherland' and 6. All terrific IMO.

The 6th is next, but tomorrow, so I'll listen to it with great pleasure and very open ears  :)

Even the tumultuous and dense 3rd Symphony for strings is spellbinding. I didn't recall it so powerful and eloquent. Popov has been an important rediscovery lately.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #71 on: March 07, 2019, 11:41:00 PM »
The 6th is next, but tomorrow, so I'll listen to it with great pleasure and very open ears  :)

Even the tumultuous and dense 3rd Symphony for strings is spellbinding. I didn't recall it so powerful and eloquent. Popov has been an important rediscovery lately.

The 6th quotes movingly from Boris Godunov I think. The symphony tries to be 'Festive' but IMO is rather tragic - like Nielsen's 6th Symphony. Hope you enjoy it Cesar.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #72 on: May 29, 2021, 03:03:58 AM »
So much of his music that desperately needs to be issued, but will probably not see the day while I am still on the ground:
Violin concerto**
Piano concerto**
Cello concerto**
Organ concerto
Concertino for Violin and Piano, Op. 4
Octet, Op. 9
Serenade for Brass, Op. 26
Melody for Violin and Piano, Op. 35
Symphony for String Quartet, Op. 61 (1951)
Quintet for Flute, Clarinet, Trumpet, Cello and Doublebass

No idea what the state of the scores/parts are for any of these.

 :-X

** Updated - according to the New Grove, several of these - like the 7th symphony - were unfinished . . .
« Last Edit: May 29, 2021, 12:22:53 PM by Scion7 »
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #73 on: May 29, 2021, 04:09:50 AM »
I think this is the fourth recording.  Others are:
* Leon Botstein
* Alexander Titov
* Gennady Provatorov
* This new one

Hopefully No. 4 gets a premiere recording soon and I would love the unfinished No. 7 too.
Provatorov is by far the best IMO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Scion7

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #74 on: May 29, 2021, 12:40:55 PM »
During the Nazi assault on Leningrad (St. Petersburg), Popov and other important artists were evacuated to Alma-Ata, Kazakh SSR.  Today, the city is known as Almaty in the independent state of Kazakhstan. After a year there, he relocated to Moscow. Safe over a thousand miles away, he worked on scores to patriotic war films, Ermler's Partizanï (ona zashchishchayet rodinu) (‘Partisans She is Defending the Fatherland’) and the Vasil'yev brothers' Front.

The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #75 on: May 29, 2021, 09:17:17 PM »
During the Nazi assault on Leningrad (St. Petersburg), Popov and other important artists were evacuated to Alma-Ata, Kazakh SSR.  Today, the city is known as Almaty in the independent state of Kazakhstan. After a year there, he relocated to Moscow. Safe over a thousand miles away, he worked on scores to patriotic war films, Ermler's Partizanï (ona zashchishchayet rodinu) (‘Partisans She is Defending the Fatherland’) and the Vasil'yev brothers' Front.


Interesting. Thanks.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #76 on: June 25, 2021, 03:46:13 PM »
I disliked Popov's Symphony No. 2 greatly, thinking it sounded so trivial.  It was a major let down from his bold and industrial No. 1.  But I just listened to it now and realize I didn't get it.  It's so fully indebted to the Russian tradition as was No. 1, but to a different tradition.  No. 1 is the result of the post Scriabin system.  I love Scriabin and immediately connected with Popov's use of Scriabin's colors and exoticism.  But No. 2, is clearly indebted to Mussorgsky's Russia.  I thought it was film music but it is really Khovanshchina.  A very traditional and perhaps even christian view of Russian liturgy ala Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky.  It is a very traditional view of Russian music in contrast to No. 1 which is more exotic and industrial view of Soviet music.  A radical shift but musically speaking, very solid and dramatic, just theatrical.  I must confess I hated No. 2 but now, I have come to realize, I dislike the performance that seems to misunderstand the heritage this work is indebted to.  I hear so much Shostakovich in this work now if I think of it as Mussorgsky inspired and we can now hear this work not as a modernist composer but as a very nationalistic composer who used contemporary devices, with No. 1, Scriabin.   

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #77 on: June 25, 2021, 11:58:11 PM »
I disliked Popov's Symphony No. 2 greatly, thinking it sounded so trivial.  It was a major let down from his bold and industrial No. 1.  But I just listened to it now and realize I didn't get it.  It's so fully indebted to the Russian tradition as was No. 1, but to a different tradition.  No. 1 is the result of the post Scriabin system.  I love Scriabin and immediately connected with Popov's use of Scriabin's colors and exoticism.  But No. 2, is clearly indebted to Mussorgsky's Russia.  I thought it was film music but it is really Khovanshchina.  A very traditional and perhaps even christian view of Russian liturgy ala Rachmaninoff and Mussorgsky.  It is a very traditional view of Russian music in contrast to No. 1 which is more exotic and industrial view of Soviet music.  A radical shift but musically speaking, very solid and dramatic, just theatrical.  I must confess I hated No. 2 but now, I have come to realize, I dislike the performance that seems to misunderstand the heritage this work is indebted to.  I hear so much Shostakovich in this work now if I think of it as Mussorgsky inspired and we can now hear this work not as a modernist composer but as a very nationalistic composer who used contemporary devices, with No. 1, Scriabin.   
Very interesting analysis. Oddly enough I was just reading a (negative) review of Popov's Symphony No.2 'Motherland' on Musicweb. I like the symphony very much and always have. Of course it is not nearly as original as the phantasmagoric Symphony No.1, which in my opinion is one of the only symphonies which compares with Shostakovich's 4th Symphony (the other one is Weinberg's 5th Symphony - especially in Kondrashin's recording). No.2 reminds me more of Khachaturian's Symphony No.2 'The Bell'. As with Popov's 6th Symphony, I find it very moving, especially the slow movement. AFAIK there are three recording by Provatorov, Titov and (surprisingly perhaps) Abendroth. I enjoy them all:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #78 on: June 26, 2021, 04:55:47 AM »
I like Popov’s 2nd symphony a lot and, in some ways, I consider it a better symphony than his oft-mentioned 1st.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Gavriil Popov 1904-1972
« Reply #79 on: June 26, 2021, 04:57:05 AM »
I like Popov’s 2nd symphony a lot and, in some ways, I consider it a better symphony than his oft-mentioned 1st.
Certainly, at the moment, I play it more than Symphony No.1. Both symphonies are great IMO.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).