Author Topic: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)  (Read 16176 times)

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Offline Cato

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #40 on: October 14, 2014, 04:31:09 PM »
I just came across this:



It seems to be an orchestration of 5 Rott songs for piano and voice, plus some connecting pieces ("Commentaries") composed by the orchestrator Enjott Schneider "in a contemporary idiom."

And...

Soon we could have a "blind listening" game for the Rott Symphony:D
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline xochitl

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #41 on: October 14, 2014, 11:46:10 PM »
just heard the string quartet in Cm

never came across Rott's music before and honestly, i can see why Brahms didnt like his stuff...a lot of it is just plain clunky. there are striking flashes of brilliance though.

now on to the symphony with Segerstam

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #42 on: May 10, 2015, 06:15:30 PM »
I am a great enthusiast for the Symphony, but I only have the Segerstam recording.

My admiration for it is strenghtened by the thought that if Rott had had a normal composing career this Symphony would have been his No.0, as it were.

However, listening to it today I suddenly realsied that Rott overuses the triangle more than a little; many of the louder passages of the Symphony have a constant tinkling in the background. Do any of the conducters of the available recordings intervene and cut back on this feature at all?

Offline Jo498

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #43 on: May 10, 2015, 09:56:35 PM »
Yes, I think the first ever recording on hyperion reduced the triangle's contributions. I now have the Weigle recording but do not remember how much triangle it has.
There are more by P. Järvi (RCA), Russel Davies (cpo), Layer/Montepellier (naive), Rückwardt/Mainz (Acousense). I have not heard them but with at least 7 recordings the piece can probably count as established. I've heard it live once with Järvi senior and the Berlin Philharmonic.
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #44 on: May 11, 2015, 02:39:34 AM »
However, listening to it today I suddenly realsied that Rott overuses the triangle more than a little; many of the louder passages of the Symphony have a constant tinkling in the background. Do any of the conducters of the available recordings intervene and cut back on this feature at all?

Rott and Segerstam turn the work into a Concerto for Triangle and Orchestra. Some here like the effect. Not me. Weigle is my favorite performance, not least of all because he and his recording team do a good job burying the annoying "tinkling."

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Cato

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #45 on: May 11, 2015, 02:47:45 AM »
I am a great enthusiast for the Symphony, but I only have the Segerstam recording.

However, listening to it today I suddenly realsied that Rott overuses the triangle more than a little; many of the louder passages of the Symphony have a constant tinkling in the background.

Some day a musicologist will prove that Rott suffered from a high-pitched tinkling tinnitus.   ;)

I am not bothered by the triangle, but yes, it is a curiosity in the orchestration. 
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

jlaurson

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #46 on: May 11, 2015, 01:12:50 PM »
Some day a musicologist will prove that Rott suffered from a high-pitched tinkling tinnitus.   ;)

I am not bothered by the triangle, but yes, it is a curiosity in the orchestration.

Are we talking about the Symphonic Concerto for Triangle by Hans Rott?

I've counted the bars in which the triangle makes an appearance!

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #47 on: April 06, 2020, 03:10:22 PM »


This recording is mercilessly breathtaking. I can't assimilate its powerful impact on me yet. Glorious beyond words!
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #48 on: April 06, 2020, 10:04:04 PM »


This recording is mercilessly breathtaking. I can't assimilate its powerful impact on me yet. Glorious beyond words!

I'm also an admirer of the symphony.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Cato

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #49 on: April 07, 2020, 04:08:37 PM »


This recording is mercilessly breathtaking. I can't assimilate its powerful impact on me yet. Glorious beyond words!

Yes, Segerstam brings out everything in a most excellent fashion!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline Cato

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #50 on: November 29, 2020, 06:01:47 AM »
I just discovered these via a Gustav Mahler FaceBook notification:






Intriguing artwork!   ;)

"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline springrite

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #51 on: November 29, 2020, 09:34:14 PM »
I just came across this:



It seems to be an orchestration of 5 Rott songs for piano and voice, plus some connecting pieces ("Commentaries") composed by the orchestrator Enjott Schneider "in a contemporary idiom."

And...

Soon we could have a "blind listening" game for the Rott Symphony:D
This is the recording that I have.

Am I the only person to have this recording???
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #52 on: December 02, 2020, 07:38:24 AM »
Am I the only person to have this recording???

I have it too. It's one of five Rott Symphony performances I own.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Daverz

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #53 on: December 02, 2020, 03:39:29 PM »
I just discovered these via a Gustav Mahler FaceBook notification:



I've read a couple reviews that trash the music.  I can easily stream it, I suppose, but don't usually intentionally seek out bad listening experiences.   I do like the Symphony in a different recording (Paavo Järvi, IIRC).

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #54 on: December 02, 2020, 10:35:22 PM »
I have it too. It's one of five Rott Symphony performances I own.

Sarge

Which is your favourite Sarge?

I only have the Cincinnati and BIS recordings.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #55 on: December 03, 2020, 05:01:53 AM »
I googled him on youtube and listened to his string symphony.  Enjoyable but, pardon in my humble opinion, not particularly memorable.  Which work do you think I should listen to next?  I'm willing to give him another shot.

PD

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #56 on: December 03, 2020, 04:49:56 PM »
Which is your favourite Sarge?

I only have the Cincinnati and BIS recordings.

I don't own the Cincinnati and actively dislike Segerstam because of the prominent triangle which grates on my nerves. I prefer Weigle but also like Albrecht, Davies and Järvi.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Online vandermolen

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #57 on: December 03, 2020, 10:43:36 PM »
I don't own the Cincinnati and actively dislike Segerstam because of the prominent triangle which grates on my nerves. I prefer Weigle but also like Albrecht, Davies and Järvi.

Sarge

Many thanks Sarge.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Jo498

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #58 on: December 04, 2020, 01:44:33 AM »
I googled him on youtube and listened to his string symphony.  Enjoyable but, pardon in my humble opinion, not particularly memorable.  Which work do you think I should listen to next?  I'm willing to give him another shot.

The rediscovery of Rott about 30 years ago was mainly about his only complete orchestral symphony in E major. While it is a remarkable work, I think both its quality and the influence on Mahler have been a bit exaggerated by Rott aficionados. But people who like Mahler and/or Bruckner should give it a try. Especially the scherzo (by far the best movement, I think) is spookily "Mahlerian".
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Online Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Hans Rott (1858 - 1884)
« Reply #59 on: December 04, 2020, 05:07:28 AM »
The rediscovery of Rott about 30 years ago was mainly about his only complete orchestral symphony in E major. While it is a remarkable work, I think both its quality and the influence on Mahler have been a bit exaggerated by Rott aficionados. But people who like Mahler and/or Bruckner should give it a try. Especially the scherzo (by far the best movement, I think) is spookily "Mahlerian".
Thank you Jo!

PD