Author Topic: The Romantics in Period Performances  (Read 189141 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #660 on: August 01, 2019, 06:34:04 AM »
Is this true?

Quote

On the earliest
recordings this means that the performers do not
play together in an exact manner. That was certainly
part of the idea: a free and easy association with
tempo and notation was self-evident – anyone who
was incapable of doing this just wasn’t a proper musician!
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Florestan

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #661 on: August 01, 2019, 09:34:19 AM »
Is this true?

What's the context of this quote? Who said that and referring to what?
“I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.”  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #662 on: August 01, 2019, 10:36:50 AM »
What's the context of this quote? Who said that and referring to what?

It's from Leila Schayegh's essay on interpreting the Brahms sonatas in the release we were discussing, it's taken from the bigger quote I posted.
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Offline Florestan

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #663 on: August 01, 2019, 10:38:16 AM »
It's from Leila Schayegh's essay on interpreting the Brahms sonatas in the release we were discussing, it's taken from the bigger quote I posted.

Thanks. Will read that longer quote asap and comment upon it.
“I compose music because I must give expression to my feelings, just as I talk because I must give utterance to my thoughts.”  --- Rachmaninoff

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #664 on: August 01, 2019, 10:30:38 PM »
Another challenging comment from Schehnegh, this time about portamento

 
Quote
We modern violinists attempt to change posi- tion as discretely as possible because we feel the sounds of sliding to be too affected, too Romantic. And there’s the problem: portamento is Romantic and forms part of the expressive repertoire of this era. If one is going to take ownership of the violinist tech- nique of the period, one has no alternative than to make the change of position discernible. Indeed, the bow must be held in a position that alters neither the pressure nor the speed through a slur. At the same time, one must let the fingers of the left hand rest as much as possible on the strings being played, even when changing position. The combination of con- stant bow contact in the right hand and finger pres- sure from the left necessarily entails a portamento, no margin being left for concealing what is thought to be undesirable.
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Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #665 on: August 25, 2019, 02:21:59 AM »

I can't tell what's going on in this recording (on period instruments). Maybe I'm in a bad mood. This is recorded badly: too much reverberation or maybe they recorded this in a subway station. But it inspired me to go back and enjoy two period recordings of the cello works: Sergei Istomin and Viviana Sofronitsky's and Christian Poltera and Ronald Brautigam's. The Poltera/Brautigam is perhaps the more inspired. 
« Last Edit: August 25, 2019, 02:25:53 AM by milk »

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #666 on: September 13, 2019, 05:44:01 AM »


Noone can say whether you'll like the voice or not, but the performance seems sufficiently original in the current context that it's well worth a listen I'd say.
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Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #667 on: September 16, 2019, 04:18:18 AM »


Noone can say whether you'll like the voice or not, but the performance seems sufficiently original in the current context that it's well worth a listen I'd say.
I should give that another listen. BTW: Is Brautigam the only one who recorded the complete "Songs Without Words" on period instruments?

Offline JBS

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #668 on: October 19, 2019, 06:43:43 AM »
Posted this last night on the WAYLT2 thread

This landed today


The premise is that while he was writing his last works, Beethoven used a Broadwood to which some sort of apparatus was attached that allowed the composer to hear, in some degree, himself play the instrument. Beghin and his associates tried to recreate the apparatus (on which information is a bit sketchy), put it on a modern replica of the Broadwood, and record the result. I am not sure whether the result is meant to be what Beethoven might have heard, or what a listener in the room would hear. The CD comes in a little book with photos and essays, and directions to a website with videos of the sonatas being played, a full length documentary, and other goodies.   The booklet provides a password (individualized for each CD, I think) that allows access to all this. (The website is Insidethehearingmachine.com) Have not read the booklet or visited the website, so I don't know yet what Beghin's intentions were.

Without that background info, the recordings seem middle of the road, non virtuosic readings recorded reasonably close, but not too close on a modern fortepiano clone, although the upper registers may be a little more "tinkly" than usual.

Update for this thread:
After posting I read through the booklet, which clarifies that the sonics are meant to replicate what the pianist (a person with normal hearing, not a person with Beethoven's deafness) hears as he plays with the "hearing machine" in place.

I have yet to watch the videos or the other material at the website, but the booklet by itself is rather interesting.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #669 on: October 19, 2019, 07:07:07 AM »
I thought the “gothic” op 110/iii was a bit special. In fact there’s a few things in that recording which I think are interesting.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2019, 07:19:25 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline San Antone

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #670 on: October 19, 2019, 09:04:40 AM »
That Beghin Beethoven recording is not for me.  The sound of the piano is not something I wish to hear playing this music.

Offline amw

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #671 on: October 19, 2019, 11:12:07 AM »
I wasn't a big fan of the ornamentation and found the interpretation somewhat pedestrian in other ways, if I recall correctly, with rubato and changes in tempo seemingly substituting for any real expression. I may listen again eventually to see if I was wrong.