Author Topic: Dmitri's Dacha  (Read 553557 times)

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Offline Maestro267

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2760 on: November 20, 2021, 05:56:16 AM »
I've finally picked up a set of the string quartets (Brodsky) and having heard 7 of them so far, they are incredibly fascinating works. I didn't realize that the eight quartets from 8-15 are arranged in pairs of relative keys.

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2761 on: November 20, 2021, 07:28:27 AM »
I've finally picked up a set of the string quartets (Brodsky) and having heard 7 of them so far, they are incredibly fascinating works. I didn't realize that the eight quartets from 8-15 are arranged in pairs of relative keys.

I hadn't noticed that but I guess it's not surprising since he apparently entertained the idea of composing one in each key.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2762 on: November 20, 2021, 08:51:26 AM »
I wonder when he got the idea, probably not already within the first handful of quartets that are spaced out quite a bit

1 1938
(he wrote the piano quintet and trio between the first two string quartets)
2 1944
3 1946
4 1949
5 1952

It's also interesting that most of the quartets are rather late pieces. The first disc I bought was with 6,10,14 (Brodsky, when they were still separate discs) and I was quite surprised that even #6 was a lateish piece (compare with Beethoven where 6,10,14 would have given you one early, one middle, one late).
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline BasilValentine

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2763 on: November 20, 2021, 10:34:08 AM »
I wonder when he got the idea, probably not already within the first handful of quartets that are spaced out quite a bit

1 1938
(he wrote the piano quintet and trio between the first two string quartets)
2 1944
3 1946
4 1949
5 1952

It's also interesting that most of the quartets are rather late pieces. The first disc I bought was with 6,10,14 (Brodsky, when they were still separate discs) and I was quite surprised that even #6 was a lateish piece (compare with Beethoven where 6,10,14 would have given you one early, one middle, one late).

This was sort of inevitable given that he came to the genre late — the first quartet composed at age 32, whereas the first symphony at 19.

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2764 on: November 20, 2021, 10:57:22 AM »
I've finally picked up a set of the string quartets (Brodsky) and having heard 7 of them so far, they are incredibly fascinating works. I didn't realize that the eight quartets from 8-15 are arranged in pairs of relative keys.

Worth a read ...

http://www.quartets.de/articles/structure.html

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2765 on: November 21, 2021, 05:19:32 AM »
Thanks. I have visited that website often during my initial listens to these quartets, which continues with No. 11 as I write.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2766 on: November 27, 2021, 01:13:59 PM »
I enjoyed this informative and entertaining review of recordings of the 4th Symphony:
https://www.psaudio.com/copper/article/a-survey-of-recordings-of-shostakovich-symphony-no-4/
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2767 on: November 27, 2021, 04:57:45 PM »
I enjoyed this informative and entertaining review of recordings of the 4th Symphony:
https://www.psaudio.com/copper/article/a-survey-of-recordings-of-shostakovich-symphony-no-4/

I'm torn between thinking he was harsh on Nelsons, and the fact that I think that yet another Shostakovich cycle was unimaginative on the part of the BSO. Oh, but at the end he give Nelsons an hon. mention.

Agree with him that the Järvi Fourth is meh, but the sound file is something entirely different ....


Most interesting, thanks, Jeffrey. Wonder what went funny with the sound clips ....
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2768 on: November 28, 2021, 06:31:01 AM »
I just wanted to stop by and tell everyone how thrilling the Muti/CSO performance is of the Babi Yar:



For those that haven't heard it, you definitely need this recording in your collection.

"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline TheGSMoeller

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2769 on: November 28, 2021, 07:47:09 AM »
I enjoyed this informative and entertaining review of recordings of the 4th Symphony:
https://www.psaudio.com/copper/article/a-survey-of-recordings-of-shostakovich-symphony-no-4/

Thanks for the link, interesting article. But is anyone else getting some groovy-blues music in the sample tracks?  ;D


I just wanted to stop by and tell everyone how thrilling the Muti/CSO performance is of the Babi Yar:



For those that haven't heard it, you definitely need this recording in your collection.


I agree, John. Truly mesmerizing.

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2770 on: November 28, 2021, 03:10:14 PM »
Thanks for the link, interesting article. But is anyone else getting some groovy-blues music in the sample tracks?  ;D

Sure ain't Shostakovich!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2771 on: November 29, 2021, 12:58:30 AM »
I'm torn between thinking he was harsh on Nelsons, and the fact that I think that yet another Shostakovich cycle was unimaginative on the part of the BSO. Oh, but at the end he give Nelsons an hon. mention.

Agree with him that the Järvi Fourth is meh, but the sound file is something entirely different ....


Most interesting, thanks, Jeffrey. Wonder what went funny with the sound clips ....

No mention of a real sleeper -



Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2772 on: November 29, 2021, 05:14:43 AM »
No mention of a real sleeper -


It's a fabulous recording - one of the best.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2773 on: November 29, 2021, 05:15:14 AM »
I just wanted to stop by and tell everyone how thrilling the Muti/CSO performance is of the Babi Yar:



For those that haven't heard it, you definitely need this recording in your collection.
On my wish list  :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2774 on: November 29, 2021, 06:46:51 AM »
It's a fabulous recording - one of the best.

No mention of a real sleeper -



Yes, I really love this recording. I am admittedly biased because Daniel Raiskin is our Music Director and conductor for my Winnipeg Symphony Orchestra.  :D

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2775 on: November 29, 2021, 07:03:08 AM »
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline OrchestralNut

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2776 on: December 03, 2021, 06:28:22 AM »
To spur on Karl:)

Of course, this music in the four ballet suites is bits and pieces from his other theater works (The Limpid Stream mainly, along with The Bolt, Suite for Jazz Orchestra No. 1, The Tale of a Priest and His Servant Balda, Michurin, The Human Comedy and The Song of the Great Rivers).

Listening to this right now, and it is hitting the spot this morning.  Haven't listened to in for awhile, but I listen to it quite frequently in the past!




Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2777 on: December 03, 2021, 09:30:00 PM »
The other day I was enjoying his 10th SQ in A flat major as played by the Pacifica Quartet. This thing about keys intrigues me importantly. I have a special fixation with this concept and how it is applied in music, in musical notes, chords, rhythm, harmony, etc. This quartet give me huge pleasure. Its construction, its musical architecture, melodical and harmonical, mostly, is nothing but astonishing.

Shostakovich was a fascinating genius. My soul resonates with his style quite a lot.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2778 on: December 03, 2021, 09:34:57 PM »
The other day I was enjoying his 10th SQ in A flat major as played by the Pacifica Quartet. This thing about keys intrigues me importantly. I have a special fixation with this concept and how it is applied in music, in musical notes, chords, rhythm, harmony, etc. This quartet give me huge pleasure. Its construction, its musical architecture, melodical and harmonical, mostly, is nothing but astonishing.

Shostakovich was a fascinating genius. My soul resonates with his style quite a lot.

That he was, Cesar. Your talk about The Bells being your favorite choral symphony made me realize that my own would be Shostakovich's Babi Yar.
"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #2779 on: December 03, 2021, 09:38:55 PM »
That he was, Cesar. Your talk about The Bells being your favorite choral symphony made me realize that my own would be Shostakovich's Babi Yar.

Of course, silly me! Ok, now I have another tie. I can't live without any of them.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen