Author Topic: Dmitri's Dacha  (Read 466302 times)

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karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #60 on: July 18, 2007, 05:32:32 AM »
You could spend much less on the Virgin budget two-fer of the Borodin playing a number of the quartets.

Nos. 2, 3, 7, 8 & 12, I believe.

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I think the quartets is a great place to start for this composer.  :)

George is right, you know  8)

George

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #61 on: July 18, 2007, 05:34:23 AM »
Nos. 2, 3, 7, 8 & 12, I believe.

George is right, you know  8)

Except in his grammar. I meant to say the quartets are a great place to start.  ::)

Offline BachQ

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #62 on: July 18, 2007, 06:23:47 AM »
D Minor! How goes the Quest?


......... Refresh my recollection .......... What am I questing for again? ............

karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #63 on: July 18, 2007, 06:46:59 AM »

......... Refresh my recollection .......... What am I questing for again? ............

Shostakovich Symphony Cycles, naturally!

Offline BachQ

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #64 on: July 18, 2007, 07:00:58 AM »
Shostakovich Symphony Cycles, naturally!

naturelement !

I have Jansons and Barshai complete sets (both of which are entirely satisfying) ........ but I haven't decided on my next set (if any) ........... I'm debating between Maxim Shostakovich's and Kiril Kondrashin's .........

Boris_G

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #65 on: July 19, 2007, 09:09:41 AM »
naturelement !

I have Jansons and Barshai complete sets (both of which are entirely satisfying) ........ but I haven't decided on my next set (if any) ........... I'm debating between Maxim Shostakovich's and Kiril Kondrashin's .........

No contest - Kondrashin's every time (though I believe Maxim occasionally hits the jackpot, from what I've heard from listeners I respect; I'll look up which symphonies if you're really interested, but I seem to remember it was one of the very late ones). What I've heard of Maxim's cycle - I remember No. 5 in particular - has been terribly uninspiring and drab; whereas Kondrashin makes the music dramatic and alive.

karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #66 on: July 19, 2007, 10:26:21 AM »
What I've heard of Maxim's cycle - I remember No. 5 in particular - has been terribly uninspiring and drab

Oh, I don't think so at all, at all.

Boris_G

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #67 on: July 19, 2007, 10:56:22 AM »
Oh, I don't think so at all, at all.

OK, let's hear your assessment of that recording. I can't offer detail myself because I haven't listened to it more than enough to convince me I could find more rewarding accounts elsewhere (back then, in the 1990s, it was Previn's Chicago SO which I enjoyed).l

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #68 on: July 19, 2007, 12:19:23 PM »
naturelement !

I have Jansons and Barshai complete sets (both of which are entirely satisfying) ........ but I haven't decided on my next set (if any) ........... I'm debating between Maxim Shostakovich's and Kiril Kondrashin's .........

Add Rostropovich to the debate........

Hey! ..........'s are fun to make!

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Valentino

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #69 on: July 19, 2007, 01:18:01 PM »
The other day I heard on the radio Leif Ove Andsnes play a hilarious polka by our man, but what more I dont know. Enlighten me please.

(It's good to be back in the virtual world, btw. We had a thunderstorm zapping our DSL just befor we went on holiday, and the new stuff arrived today.)
We audiophiles don't really like music, but we sure love the sound it makes

karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #70 on: July 20, 2007, 01:43:19 PM »
For Boris, wherever he may be . . . .

(back then, in the 1990s, it was Previn's Chicago SO which I enjoyed)

That's a very enjoyable one.  Listening to it now.

karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #71 on: August 15, 2007, 05:24:40 AM »
TTT

Offline PaulR

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #72 on: August 21, 2007, 04:44:52 PM »
i got yet another account of the 14th.  Rattle with the BPO with Karita Mattila as the Soprano and Thomas Quasthoff as the bass. 

they all do a pretty good, I thing. The sound is clear as well.  :)

Offline Valentino

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #73 on: August 23, 2007, 04:05:40 AM »
The other day I heard on the radio Leif Ove Andsnes play a hilarious polka by our man, but what more I dont know.

Found out. It's a polka from the ballet “L’age d’or”. It's on his "Horizons" album, which in general is not my thing at all. Too much konfekt.
We audiophiles don't really like music, but we sure love the sound it makes

Offline Cato

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #74 on: September 13, 2007, 05:40:42 PM »
The Thirteenth Symphony "Babi Yar" by Shostakovich is what graced my stereo system last night.

I have not heard the entire work in years, and was struck by a few things.  Commentators back in the '70's remarked upon its Mahlerian aspects, e.g. the juxtaposition of the sacred and the profane.

What struck me last night was the work's great affinity with...Rachmaninov!      :o

The first, third, and fifth movements especially evoked the atmosphere of The Rach's choral symphony The Bells along with other works, like the 3 Russian Folksongs and the cantata Spring.  To be sure, you can also occasionally hear Prokofiev's ghost fiddling around now and then, e.g. in the second movement. 

The ideational parallels between the Poe/Balmont texts for The Bells and the Yevtushenko poems are not obvious at first perhaps, but the Shostakovich music helps to build a bridge between the two eras.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

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karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #75 on: September 14, 2007, 03:03:51 AM »
Very interesting, Cato!

And that second movement, "Humor," is cousin to one of the Opus 62 Romances in verse by Burns, Raleigh & Shakespeare, originally composed in 1942 (hence, while Prokofiev yet abode).

Offline Cato

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #76 on: September 14, 2007, 05:01:25 AM »
Very interesting, Cato!

And that second movement, "Humor," is cousin to one of the Opus 62 Romances in verse by Burns, Raleigh & Shakespeare, originally composed in 1942 (hence, while Prokofiev yet abode).

Aha!  That detail was not in the liner notes: the performance was by Maris Janssons and the Bavarian Radio Orchestra.  Very nicely done, I thought.

There was always a kind of anticipatory excitement back in the 50's, '60's, and '70's among classical music people, specifically because of Shostakovich and what he might bring forth in the next year.  This work particularly created many "great expectations" about the future and what Shostakovich might bring us.

Interesting that Stravinsky (as I recall at least) was not generating the same kind of excitement, probably because of the dodecaphonic nature of the later works: I recall critics fussing especially about The Flood as unnecessarily complex.
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

karlhenning

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Re: Dmitri's Dacha
« Reply #77 on: September 14, 2007, 05:22:51 AM »
The Flood was a curious innovation ('an opera for TV' sort of angle) and I had an idea that much of the problem, for instance, was the station-breaks :-)

But maybe some find it too complex . . . after a couple of Carter or Wuorinen listening jags, though, I find it hard to lose patience with late Stravinsky on the basis of complexity  ;)

Offline Varg

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The 16th Quartet!!
« Reply #78 on: September 18, 2007, 12:52:12 PM »
I saw this on youtube. It's amazing; sounds like the soundtrack of a madman's mind, absolutely grim.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=iAKLKokYDso

The sound is weak. Listen with headphones.
« Last Edit: September 18, 2007, 12:58:47 PM by Shunk_Manitu_Tanka »

The Emperor

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Re: The 16th Quartet!!
« Reply #79 on: September 18, 2007, 06:25:53 PM »
I saw this on youtube. It's amazing; sounds like the soundtrack of a madman's mind, absolutely grim.

http://youtube.com/watch?v=iAKLKokYDso

The sound is weak. Listen with headphones.


Haven't heard this before, it's so Shosty, love it, so dark, loveeeee it!