Author Topic: Schubert Lieder  (Read 36041 times)

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Offline knight66

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #40 on: June 10, 2008, 09:41:02 AM »
I got the wrong end of the stick; I thought you only had Ameling.

Here is the site for you, the texts and translations, very useful.

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
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mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #41 on: June 10, 2008, 09:44:16 AM »
I got the wrong end of the stick; I thought you only had Ameling.

Here is the site for you, the texts and translations, very useful.

http://www.recmusic.org/lieder/

Mike

Thanks, Mike.


mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #42 on: June 10, 2008, 09:53:18 AM »
Not sure if you like him, but this fellow has kicked off a series of CDs.

Offline knight66

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #43 on: June 10, 2008, 09:57:23 AM »
Yes, I do like him and have one Schubert disc by him. He is one of a number of very fine baritones who are giving us excellent discs of lied.

Of the ones you have heard are there any particular songs spike your interest?

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #44 on: June 10, 2008, 10:04:17 AM »
Yes, I do like him and have one Schubert disc by him. He is one of a number of very fine baritones who are giving us excellent discs of lied.

Of the ones you have heard are there any particular songs spike your interest?

Mike

"Der Doppelganger" is a good one. That caught my attention the first time I heard it, many years ago.

Offline knight66

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #45 on: June 10, 2008, 10:09:23 AM »
Yes, sinister and mysterious. If you fancy something a bit different...



Schubert songs orchestrated by other, mostly great, composers. Again, it throws new light onto the songs and I always enjoy discovering how one composer makes use or takes an interest in another.

Mike
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #46 on: June 10, 2008, 10:14:18 AM »
Yes, sinister and mysterious. If you fancy something a bit different...



Schubert songs orchestrated by other, mostly great, composers. Again, it throws new light onto the songs and I always enjoy discovering how one composer makes use or takes an interest in another.

Mike

Very cool. If I can find it, I'll "wish list" it.

Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #47 on: June 11, 2008, 08:40:29 AM »
I had to forward a question about this issue to Hyperion and was rewarded with a prompt answer:

Indeed, and we have been waiting for nearly three years now. Yale University Press will publish the book or books but still we have no information on a publishing date.
 
Regards.
 
Simon Perry
Director
Hyperion Records Limited
PO Box 25
London SE9 1AX
Tel: 020 8318 1234
Fax: 020 8463 1230
www.hyperion-records.co.uk


Rubio, thanks for the update although it still leaves us hanging.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Online Sergeant Rock

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #48 on: June 11, 2008, 08:44:23 AM »
So...no one's listening to the Naxos CDs?

Not in this house. Since I have the complete Hyperion edition plus quite a few recital discs by other singers I like, there just isn't room for Naxos. If I were a Lieder specialist I'd want to hear them probably...but I'm not. Too much other music to listen to.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline Brewski

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #49 on: June 11, 2008, 08:49:32 AM »
Not sure if you like him, but this fellow has kicked off a series of CDs.

Goerne has a gorgeous voice, and uses it very expressively.  The CD below of Schubert's Goethe-Lieder is one of my favorite vocal recordings. 

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #50 on: June 11, 2008, 03:40:59 PM »
Looks good, Bruce.

I've decided to show you guys my Schubert lieder.  ;D

This is probably my favorite. It's just gorgeous:



This is Schwarzkopf and Fischer. I bought this then forgot about it. Bad move, eh?



Here's Fischer-Dieskau and Moore from 1955. Everyone needs some F-D:



Larry Rinkel told me about this guy, and I'm glad he did!



So, that's it. Not much I guess.  :)
« Last Edit: June 11, 2008, 03:44:13 PM by MN Dave »

uffeviking

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #51 on: June 11, 2008, 05:46:52 PM »
Dave: maybe you could bring yourself to update your collection to contemporary singers, men and women not busy pushing up daisies. Follow Bruce's recommendation and you can't go wrong. Goerne caught my attention in Henze's successful opera L'Upupa. Since so many Schubert songs are based on the works of German poets it is almost essential the singer is thoroughly familiar with those poems.

If you do not speak German, by all means, do get the text to each of Schubert's songs, the music alone will not reveal to you the deep beauty of the compositions.

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #52 on: June 11, 2008, 06:10:13 PM »
Dave: maybe you could bring yourself to update your collection to contemporary singers, men and women not busy pushing up daisies. Follow Bruce's recommendation and you can't go wrong. Goerne caught my attention in Henze's successful opera L'Upupa. Since so many Schubert songs are based on the works of German poets it is almost essential the singer is thoroughly familiar with those poems.

If you do not speak German, by all means, do get the text to each of Schubert's songs, the music alone will not reveal to you the deep beauty of the compositions.

I agree. I'd love to.

So much music to buy. So little money.  ::)

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #53 on: June 11, 2008, 06:58:21 PM »
I used Mike's link above (Thanks, Mike!) and followed along to a few Schubert lieder from the CDs I mentioned. And you're right. It's not only nice to read what they're singing about, it added a whole new dimension to the songs for me, making them twice as potent--at least. However, as cool as that site is, I would much rather read translations from a book. Are there any books of this nature available?

Thanks, Schubertians.  :)

P.S. I listened to a couple Brahms songs as well (Bernarda Fink/Roger Vignoles) with translations. Gorgeous! Man, that is one killer album.

« Last Edit: June 11, 2008, 07:00:39 PM by MN Dave »

Offline Que

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #54 on: June 11, 2008, 08:48:29 PM »
I used Mike's link above (Thanks, Mike!) and followed along to a few Schubert lieder from the CDs I mentioned. And you're right. It's not only nice to read what they're singing about, it added a whole new dimension to the songs for me, making them twice as potent--at least. However, as cool as that site is, I would much rather read translations from a book. Are there any books of this nature available?

Thanks, Schubertians.  :)

For a comprehensive book with texts of German songs, this proved very worthwhile for me. 138 of its 713 pages are devoted to all major Schubert songs.

Though I can read German, it's still convenient for me to have so many texts available in this way. Very handy when I listen to historical recordings that never include them. BTW the English translations seem quite good to me.


                                   linked

Q
« Last Edit: June 11, 2008, 08:53:25 PM by Que »

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #55 on: June 12, 2008, 03:13:12 AM »
Thanks, Que!

Offline Brewski

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #56 on: June 12, 2008, 05:38:18 AM »
P.S. I listened to a couple Brahms songs as well (Bernarda Fink/Roger Vignoles) with translations. Gorgeous! Man, that is one killer album.



Dave, thanks for mentioning this.  I've just recently heard Fink for the first time (live, in the Mahler 2) and would like to hear more of her.  This looks like an excellent recording. 

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

mn dave

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #57 on: June 12, 2008, 05:39:50 AM »
Dave, thanks for mentioning this.  I've just recently heard Fink for the first time (live, in the Mahler 2) and would like to hear more of her.  This looks like an excellent recording. 

--Bruce

My heartstrings aren't your heartstrings, but I dare say, you will be moved.

Offline Tsaraslondon

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #58 on: June 12, 2008, 06:09:04 AM »


This is Schwarzkopf and Fischer. I bought this then forgot about it. Bad move, eh?





Forgetting about it was an extremely bad move. Buying it was not. This is one of the classic Schubert recitals, Schwarzkopf and Fischer being entirely at one in their vision. I don't necessarily agree with the Schwarzkopf detractors, who find her style too artificial and mannered, something I deplore in the singing of Ian Bostridge, for instance. However this recital was recorded at a time when Schwarzkopf's voice was at its freshest, her manner quite direct. Amongst so many lovely performances, I find it hard to single out particular songs, but I love this version of Gretchen am Spinnrade more than any I know, though Schwarzkopf herself criticised it in later years as being too operatic. Maybe that's why I love it. When Schwarzkopf describes the moment that Faust kissed her, she sings the words sein Kuss with a barely restrained horror, that I have never encountered in any other performance. This is after all the moment that changed Margarethe's life irrevocably for ever. I also love Fischer's exquisite playing in Auf dem Wasser zu singen, his deft handling of the accompaniment rippling through the song like moonlight on the water.



\"A beautiful voice is not enough.\" Maria Callas

Offline knight66

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Re: Schubert Lieder
« Reply #59 on: June 12, 2008, 06:47:02 AM »
Dave, I am glad the link has spurred you on. A book is in many ways better, you may not want to listen while tied to your computer.

I, as usual, see eye to eye with TL. The Schwarzkopf disc is a beauty. I also have the Ameling you mention. It is a mixed Schubert and Schumann recital, played on fortepiano, it is a great favourite of mine.

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Schubert-Lieder-Franz/dp/B000002SEJ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=music&qid=1213284924&sr=1-1

I urge this double disc on you. It is a conflation of two earlyish Janet Baker LPs and one she made much later for EMI. There are so many highlights, but the words are vital. Litanei is a prayer and she brings an astonishing stillness to the piece.

An de untergehende Sonne is one of Schubert's nature songs; tender and with a beautiful falling melody. It is strophic in form, each verse given its own character and another song with a beautifully peaceful close to it.

Simon Keenlyside produced a disc for Classics for Pleasure. The accompaniest is one of the most perceptive; Malcolm Martineau. Du bist de Ruh is as beautiful as when Margaret Price or Janowitz delivered it.

Martineau also guided the young Terfel safely through Schwanengesang. He shakes the ground in Der Atlas, his juicy voice coping with a great deal of pressure, but it sounds neither operatic nor vulgar. By contrast he provides agony in Aufenthalt.

So many great performancess out there. I could go on and on.

Mike
« Last Edit: June 12, 2008, 06:53:14 AM by knight »
DavidW: Yeah Mike doesn't get angry, he gets even.
I wasted time: and time wasted me.