Author Topic: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)  (Read 107138 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline OrchestralNut

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4827
  • Krzysztof Penderecki (1933-2020)
  • Location: Winnipeg, Canada
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #540 on: May 03, 2021, 09:43:47 AM »
Greatly enjoying my first ever listen to these works!

44 Duos for two violins, BB104

Sarah and Deborah Nemtanu, violins

Sonata for Solo Violin, BB124

Viktoria Mullova, violin

Decca



 


Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 58070
  • Jean Sibelius (1865 - 1957)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
  • Currently Listening to:
    19th Century through the 21st Century
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #541 on: May 03, 2021, 01:13:51 PM »
Greatly enjoying my first ever listen to these works!

44 Duos for two violins, BB104

Sarah and Deborah Nemtanu, violins

Sonata for Solo Violin, BB124

Viktoria Mullova, violin

Decca



Yep, great stuff, Ray!
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13029
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
"Bluebeard's Castle" in new chamber version, free to view Aug. 13-17
« Reply #542 on: July 23, 2021, 06:45:20 AM »
This looks most interesting:

"The English Symphony Orchestra (ESO) complete their first year of Music from Wyastone virtual concerts with a concert performance of Béla Bartók’s one-act opera, Duke Bluebeard’s Castle, written in 1911. The performance, which premieres on ESO Digital at 7:30pm on Friday 13 August, marks the first performance of a new arrangement of the opera, for 25 performers including organ, by the ESO’s Assistant Conductor, Michael Karcher-Young, and Australian conductor and arranger, Chris van Tuinen. The work is sung in Hungarian and English subtitles are provided."

English Symphony Orchestra
Kenneth Woods, Conductor
April Fredrick, Judith / David Stout, Bluebeard

http://www.colinscolumn.com/bartoks-opera-bluebeards-castle-english-symphony-orchestra-perform-new-chamber-version-free-digital-concert-available-from-13-august/

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13029
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #543 on: August 25, 2021, 06:42:46 AM »
"One of the most welcome distractions of 2021 has been the Tesla Quartet's exploration of Bartók’s magnificent contributions to the genre."

In the September issue of The Strad, my article on the quartet and their Bartók journey (all on YouTube) that included interviews, rehearsals, and performances.

https://www.thestrad.com/reviews/live-streamed-concert-review-tesla-quartet-a-bartok-journey/13376.article

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7479
  • Location: USA
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #544 on: August 25, 2021, 07:44:02 AM »
"One of the most welcome distractions of 2021 has been the Tesla Quartet's exploration of Bartók’s magnificent contributions to the genre."

In the September issue of The Strad, my article on the quartet and their Bartók journey (all on YouTube) that included interviews, rehearsals, and performances.

https://www.thestrad.com/reviews/live-streamed-concert-review-tesla-quartet-a-bartok-journey/13376.article

--Bruce
Oh, cool!  I look forward to watching those!  Question:  So is Károly Schranz one of the members of Tesla?  Or was he one of the people with whom the group spoke to about the quartets?  Or something else?

You had written:  "In comments about the Fifth, Károly Schranz – founding second violinist of the Takács Quartet – mentioned going to Banff in 1981. There he studied Bartók with Zoltán Székely, violinist of the Hungarian Quartet, whose bragging rights included working directly with the composer."

PD

p.s.  Been visiting (sometimes revisiting) some of the Bartok recordings that I have these past few days.  :)

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13029
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #545 on: August 25, 2021, 08:20:43 AM »
First, thanks for reading! I am never sure who reads these things, and I'm grateful to be writing for the magazine, given a) the state of music journalism, and b) the state of print publications.

And no, Schranz is actually now in Boulder, Colorado, teaching at the University of Colorado. The Tesla members interviewed him, given his unique point of view.

What are some of the recordings you've been listening to? (As far as CDs of the quartets, I think the only complete set I have is by the Emerson's. It's a good set, but obviously there are many others these days.)

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7479
  • Location: USA
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #546 on: August 25, 2021, 08:56:44 AM »
First, thanks for reading! I am never sure who reads these things, and I'm grateful to be writing for the magazine, given a) the state of music journalism, and b) the state of print publications.

And no, Schranz is actually now in Boulder, Colorado, teaching at the University of Colorado. The Tesla members interviewed him, given his unique point of view.

What are some of the recordings you've been listening to? (As far as CDs of the quartets, I think the only complete set I have is by the Emerson's. It's a good set, but obviously there are many others these days.)

--Bruce
Well, thanks for writing!  :)

The first recording of his string quartets that I purchased was with the Takacs Quartet.  I found one used (not terribly long ago) with the Keller Quartet (but haven't listened to it yet to be honest).

In terms of recent listening:  today--his Concerto Pour Alto on Calliope with Vladimir Bukac, the Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra and Valek.  Yesterday or the day before:  his Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 1 with André Gertler and Diane Anderson on Supraphon (4-CD box set of Bartok's violin works).

By the way, I tried the link from that review and it didn't work.  I was able to find the quartets, practices and interviews/discussion on youtube though.  Hard to figure out the order that they were done though.   ::)  Good ole youtube!  ;)

Best wishes,

PD

Offline Brewski

  • Global Moderator
  • *
  • Posts: 13029
  • "Man With No Shadow" by Makoto Tojiki (2009)
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #547 on: August 25, 2021, 09:14:00 AM »
In terms of recent listening:  today--his Concerto Pour Alto on Calliope with Vladimir Bukac, the Czech Radio Symphony Orchestra and Valek.  Yesterday or the day before:  his Sonata for Violin and Piano No. 1 with André Gertler and Diane Anderson on Supraphon (4-CD box set of Bartok's violin works).


Ah, thanks. Not familiar with any of those! Nice to have so many choices, and the Gertler/Anderson sounds like something I should seek out.

(And sorry for the link not working. I just write, I don't format! But glad you found the stuff, anyway.)

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 7479
  • Location: USA
Re: Béla Bartók (1881-1945)
« Reply #548 on: August 25, 2021, 09:21:40 AM »
Ah, thanks. Not familiar with any of those! Nice to have so many choices, and the Gertler/Anderson sounds like something I should seek out.

(And sorry for the link not working. I just write, I don't format! But glad you found the stuff, anyway.)

--Bruce
The Gertler set is quite special.  You can read more about him/it here:  https://www.supraphon.com/album/245-bartok-violin-works-complete

Best,

PD