Author Topic: L' Salle Pleyel  (Read 6948 times)

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Spineur

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #20 on: February 26, 2016, 05:27:29 AM »
Most of you are referring to the composer Ignace Pleyel.  Pleyel is also the name of a piano manufacturer who sponsored the construction of a concert Hall (La salle Pleyel) which could host symphonic concerts.  Since its opening in 1927, this concert Hall was almost exclusively dedicated to classical music and was quite successful, although a number of renovation had to be done over the years.
Recently, there has been an uproar against a project to sell this iconic place to a private group (Fimalac) with the injunction to forbid the performance of any form of classical music.  This is because a new place (La philarmonie) has opened.  Because it is not as centrally located, politicians were concerned that "La Salle Pleyel" would be an unwanted competition to their political project of "La philarmonie".  This is presently challenged in courts.  It will be interesting to see what happens in the future with a conservative government.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 05:29:02 AM by Spineur »

Online SonicMan46

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2016, 07:53:03 AM »
Most of you are referring to the composer Ignace Pleyel.  Pleyel is also the name of a piano manufacturer who sponsored the construction of a concert Hall (La salle Pleyel) which could host symphonic concerts.  Since its opening in 1927, this concert Hall was almost exclusively dedicated to classical music and was quite successful, although a number of renovation had to be done over the years...................

Hello, not sure if you are implying that there were different people name PleyelIgnaz Pleyel (also first named spelled Ignace) (1757-1831) was a musician, composer, music publisher, and piano producer - his piano company built the original Salle Pleyel, and the same company replaced the hall in 1927 - below just a few quotes w/ the sources given.  Dave :)

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The piano firm Pleyel et Cie was founded by Ignace Pleyel and continued by Pleyel's son Camille (1788–1855), a piano virtuoso who became his father's business partner as of 1815. The firm provided pianos used by Frédéric Chopin, and also ran a concert hall, the Salle Pleyel, in which Chopin performed his first—and also his last—Paris concerts. Source

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A replacement 3,000-seat hall was commissioned in 1927[3] by piano manufacturer Pleyel et Cie and designed by Gustave Lion. Source

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Pleyel et Cie ("Pleyel and Company") was a French piano manufacturing firm founded by the composer Ignace Pleyel in 1807. Source
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 04:00:36 PM by SonicMan46 »

Spineur

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #22 on: February 26, 2016, 12:09:05 PM »
The piano manufacture was really developped by Camille the son of the composer.  (Ignace Pleyel died in 1831).  It is Camille who sponsored the concert Hall "Salle Pleyel" opened in 1927.
Anyway, the issue I raised is what is left of the Pleyel name ?
The composition of Ignace Pleyel are so rarely performed today.  The piano manfacture developped by his family is now defunct
http://www.lemonde.fr/emploi/article/2013/11/12/fermeture-annoncee-de-la-manufacture-de-pianos-pleyel_3512401_1698637.html
So the only thing really left is the concert Hall.  This is why many people want to see it continuing as one of the flagship of classical music.
« Last Edit: February 26, 2016, 12:12:39 PM by Spineur »

Online SonicMan46

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #23 on: February 26, 2016, 04:01:23 PM »
The piano manufacture was really developped by Camille the son of the composer.  (Ignace Pleyel died in 1831).  It is Camille who sponsored the concert Hall "Salle Pleyel" opened in 1927.
Anyway, the issue I raised is what is left of the Pleyel name ?
The composition of Ignace Pleyel are so rarely performed today.  The piano manfacture developped by his family is now defunct
http://www.lemonde.fr/emploi/article/2013/11/12/fermeture-annoncee-de-la-manufacture-de-pianos-pleyel_3512401_1698637.html
So the only thing really left is the concert Hall.  This is why many people want to see it continuing as one of the flagship of classical music.

Good points and thanks for noting my date error - corrected to 1831.  Dave :)

Online SonicMan46

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #24 on: February 01, 2019, 10:30:59 AM »
Well, back to the top after nearly 3 years - the quote below is a post I made nearly 4 years ago, I just added 2 more volumes of Pleyel's Prussian Quartets, Nos. 1-9 performed by the period instrument group Pleyel Quartett Köln, and now have all 3 CDs - as mentioned below Jerry Dubins left a rather scathing assessment of this group, mainly criticizing the period instrument performances - I've attached his review along others which are much more laudable; back in early 2015 a number of members 'chimed in' w/ their thoughts, so take a look if interested.  Although certainly not 'on par' w/ Haydn & Mozart in string writing, I find these works quite enjoyable and would have to agree w/ the more positive comments in the attached reviews.  Dave :)

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Back to the top for comments on the ongoing series below - has been a while!  :laugh:

Pleyel Quartett Köln from 2008-2014 has released the 3 CDs below of Pleyel's Prussian Quartets - Snyprrr back in 2009 seem to think that the third set below was second rate, and the reviews have been mixed - e.g. a positive MusicWeb review of Nos. 4-6 HERE; however, a scathing review of Nos. 7-9 by Jerry Dubins (attached) - are they really that bad!   ::)   Curious  - any comments from those who may own and/or have heard these works.  Thanks - Dave :)


   

Online SonicMan46

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #25 on: June 04, 2021, 12:06:43 PM »
Yet again, TTT!  :laugh:  In the last few days, I've been listening to my Pleyel collection (about 18 CDs), 8 being String Quartets & Quintets, which I decided to spin today - I've been leaving posts in the 'listening thread' but decided to repost here - some new info added, plus the attachments contain a LOT of reviews for those who like that approach.  Now listening to the last 3 discs and will do an upcoming post or two here.  Dave :)

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Pleyel, Ignaz (1757-1831) - Prussian String Quartets (B.331-339) w/ Pleyel Quartetto Köln on period instruments and gut strings.  Pleyel wrote about 70 String Quartets w/ Benton numbers (Source), although others state a somewhat smaller quantity (at least 50+).  The name derives from their dedication to Frederick Wilhelm II, successor of Frederick the Great in 1787; of course, Haydn and Mozart had their own Prussian Quartets, but Pleyel wrote a total of 12, 9 of which are performed in the recordings below.  About a half dozen reviews are attached virtually all quite positive and laudatory except the sole one by Jerry Dubins who seemed to have hated the recording w/ Nos. 7-9, raking the performers and instruments 'over the coals'; I think he woke up on the wrong side of the bed w/ wax in his ears, but just my two cents.  My collection contains 5 more discs of his String Quartets & Quintets (total of 24 - might just stop there!  ::))  Dave :)

   

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Pleyel, Ignaz (1757-1831) - String Quartets, Op. 2, Nos.1-6 w/ Ensō Quartet - well, I thought of just continuing w/ the rest of the discs in my collection of Pleyel's SQs - in the mid-1770s, Pleyel studied w/ Haydn for several years; his Op. 2 works were written in 1784 and are early in Pleyel's String Quartet composing; from the Benton Catalogue, their numbers are B. 307-312.  Attached are a half dozen or so reviews for those interested - most are quite good except for some 'average' ratings by the All Music reviewers. Dave :)

 

Online SonicMan46

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Re: L' Salle Pleyel
« Reply #26 on: June 04, 2021, 12:35:12 PM »
Now listening to the CDs below:

Pleyel's String Quartets, B. 365-367 and String Quintets, B. 271-273 & B. 277-279 (B. refers to the Rita Benton Catalogue of his works); she includes about 70 (or more w/ A/B versions) String Quartets and over a dozen String Quintets (and more if Quintets w/ flute/oboe are added).

These 3 CDs are produced by Ars Produktion which has released nearly 20 recordings of Pleyel's compositions, shown in the bottom figure (click to enlarge, if interested).  About two-thirds of these are available on Spotify; many of the other discs are Symphonies, S. Concertantes, Concertos, and more string works.  Few seem to be available on Amazon USA or across the pond at the usual sites that I frequent, but there is an International Pleyel Society that has a shop w/ many recorded offerings - believe an upcoming post.  Dave :)

   


Offline Scion7

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Re: Ignace Joseph Pleyel (1757-1831)
« Reply #27 on: November 03, 2021, 07:45:03 PM »
Gurn, any chance of re-titling this topic? 
I have it on good authority that Snyprrr was lured/abducted by a couple of female vampires to a cave in Silesia, where they drain him nightly of just enough blood to keep themselves alive, but not causing the death of the host . . . obviously, the lad won't be coming back to complain, the poor chap hanging upside down and bound to prevent escape.   :P
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal