Author Topic: Gubaidulina's Canticle  (Read 11311 times)

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Offline Brewski

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #20 on: February 06, 2011, 02:26:00 PM »
Just curious, what didn't you like about it?  :-\  (I confess I haven't heard it since--aside from the two live performances.)

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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #21 on: February 06, 2011, 02:28:30 PM »
It's curious that so much of Gubaidulina's recent output is written for multiple guitars. From her current catalogue we have:

  • Ravvedimento for cello and guitar quartet (2007)
  • Pentimento, arrangement of Ravvedimento for double bass and three guitars (2007)
  • Repentance, arrangement of Ravvedimento for cello, three guitars and double bass (2008)
  • Sotto voce for viola, double bass and two guitars (2010)

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #22 on: February 06, 2011, 02:32:26 PM »
Just curious, what didn't you like about it?  :-\  (I confess I haven't heard it since--aside from the two live performances.)

In his 1990s documentary series Leaving Home, Simon Rattle recounted that Gubaidulina viewed music with a repetitive beat, namely the early Soviet rock 'n' roll she heard in her Moscow apartment block, as demonic. I find the taped material in Feast during a Plague to be a facile and downright crotchety method of representing evil. "Get off my lawn, you crazy kids with your techno music!"

Offline Brewski

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #23 on: February 06, 2011, 02:34:55 PM »
Ah, gotcha. I hadn't heard that story, thanks, and can see your point.

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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #24 on: October 24, 2011, 02:05:39 PM »
I finally got a radio recording of Two Paths, Gubaidulina's concerto for two violas and orchestra. It's a real shame this was never commercially recorded, as it's one of her strongest works of the era.

The piece was written for the NY Philharmonic. Didn't the NY Phil have some policy in the 1990s that they had the rights to first recording of anything they commissioned, which meant that a piece could never be recorded if they didn't want to do it themselves? I recall Carter's Symphonia facing the same problem.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2011, 02:12:17 PM by CRCulver »

Offline not edward

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #25 on: October 24, 2011, 03:56:50 PM »
I finally got a radio recording of Two Paths, Gubaidulina's concerto for two violas and orchestra. It's a real shame this was never commercially recorded, as it's one of her strongest works of the era.

The piece was written for the NY Philharmonic. Didn't the NY Phil have some policy in the 1990s that they had the rights to first recording of anything they commissioned, which meant that a piece could never be recorded if they didn't want to do it themselves? I recall Carter's Symphonia facing the same problem.
At least Symphonia did get recorded, though IIRC that's a more complex situation as each part of it was commissioned by a different orchestra or orchestras.

I had the chance to get a first listen to the new bayan concerto Fachwerk last week--I wasn't any too impressed, but hopefully it'll come over better on a second try. It seemed, though, an odd decision to couple it with Silenzio--a work that Naxos has already recorded. (Surely one or two of the many other bayan pieces would have been a better option.)
"I don't at all mind actively disliking a piece of contemporary music, but in order to feel happy about it I must consciously understand why I dislike it. Otherwise it remains in my mind as unfinished business."
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #26 on: January 11, 2012, 04:27:09 AM »
Next month ECM will release a disc with yet another (the fourth!) recording of Gubaidulina's "Canticle of the Sun". What really makes it special, however, is the first commercial recording of "The Lyre of Orpheus" for violin and strings, which really deserved to be called the composer's second violin concerto -- I've loved the piece from a radio recording for years, and it's much better than the Violin Concerto No. 2 we eventually got.

raduneo

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #27 on: March 06, 2012, 03:25:00 PM »
Next month ECM will release a disc with yet another (the fourth!) recording of Gubaidulina's "Canticle of the Sun". What really makes it special, however, is the first commercial recording of "The Lyre of Orpheus" for violin and strings, which really deserved to be called the composer's second violin concerto -- I've loved the piece from a radio recording for years, and it's much better than the Violin Concerto No. 2 we eventually got.

You can find it on youtube! http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=A4lPrz4Nhtk
I would have to listen to it more carefully, but my initial impression was quite positive.

Another piece that I REALLY liked is a cello octet called Fata Morgana, very inventive, and the end is a lot of great fun! Again, you can find it on youtube:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ktUNVOrXGto

"The unusual ensemble (eight cellos) offers a variety of sound and textural possibilities. The luminous natural harmonics were especially interesting for me. I used these in order to give expression to the form of a dancing sun. Let us imagine the image of a disk of the sun rotating very rapidly round its own immobile centre and throwing out "flame arrows" in various directions. This image arises in the last third of the work. Everything that has happened before is merely a preparation for this moment."

raduneo

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #28 on: April 04, 2012, 04:01:04 AM »
An interview with Gubaidulina popped up today at www.classicalarchives.com, with the occasion of her 80th birthday. She discusses a few of her pieces, as well as the techniques and ideologies that are part of her music. If you like her music, you should check it out!

http://www.classicalarchives.com/feature/gubaidulina_interview2.html

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #29 on: February 04, 2013, 09:14:55 AM »
Any news on when we'll finally hear Gubaidulina's Concerto for Orchestra? It was supposed to be premiered all the way back in 2011 by the Concertgebouw, but the composer said she hadn't finished it in time because of illness.

Offline lescamil

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #30 on: February 04, 2013, 07:56:34 PM »
Any news on when we'll finally hear Gubaidulina's Concerto for Orchestra? It was supposed to be premiered all the way back in 2011 by the Concertgebouw, but the composer said she hadn't finished it in time because of illness.

Meanwhile we only have this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z0lHdCCZWfE&feature=related
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #31 on: January 16, 2020, 06:07:46 PM »
The last post was in 2013!  ::)

I couldn't help listening to this excellent CD with her string quartets:



My goodness, tremendously mind-blowing stuff!! I'm in sheer awe with this. Some of the most striking string quartets I've heard recently. Their sonorities make them sound utterly intriguing, spooky, even scary at times. Unexpected stunning music. Where had they been all this time??? I can't recommend this enough for the curious and adventurous listener.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #32 on: August 23, 2021, 07:50:05 PM »
I figured I would resurrect this thread from abyss. Lately, I have found myself in throes of a bit of a Gubaidulina binge. I remained for many years rather ambivalent to her music, but, as often the case with me and gaining more listening experience, I have to say she’s become a favorite. I think she is one of those composers along her contemporaries like Schnittke, Denisov et. al. who essentially gave their finger to the whole Soviet musical establishment, although Schnittke doesn’t completely break with tradition nor does Gubaidulina, but what I find fascinating about her music is her use of space or, at least, in many of the works I’ve heard this past week or so. She is truly a unique compositional voice and I have found that in several of the interviews I’ve seen of her via YouTube that she truly believes that her music is on another spiritual plane. It’s not of this earth.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #33 on: August 25, 2021, 06:35:45 PM »
Some videos with Gubaidulina:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/oEFnOCl5Ufo" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/oEFnOCl5Ufo</a>

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaT3ksqDsqY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vaT3ksqDsqY</a>

A deeply fascinating composer on many levels.

« Last Edit: August 25, 2021, 06:39:01 PM by Mirror Image »
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #34 on: September 07, 2021, 07:22:04 PM »
I ordered this concert/documentary tonight:



Definitely looking forward to watching this film as I’ve been listening to quite a bit of Gubaidulina these last couple of weeks.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Brewski

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Celebrating Gubaidulina's 90th
« Reply #35 on: October 25, 2021, 11:51:27 AM »
One of my favorite composers, Gubaidulina turned 90 yesterday. Right now, listening to her Second String Quartet (1987) by the Danish String Quartet, who are fantastic. (My first listen to this recording.)

About 9 minutes long, the piece opens with a unison "G" meditation, before venturing elsewhere. Some kind soul has synced the recording with the score, which is always welcome as one of the best educational tools.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyHVU3ny4c

--Bruce
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #36 on: October 25, 2021, 12:15:05 PM »
It's hard to fathom that she's 90 yrs. old and she's showing no signs of slowing down either it seems. She's still composing. It seems she's even more active now than she was say 30 years ago. I guess with as much recognition she gets nowadays, she has more and more obligations or things she's agreed to like interviews, public speeches, etc. She's such a huge inspiration to me.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Artem

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #37 on: October 25, 2021, 12:31:21 PM »
Gubaidulina and Ustvolskaya are my favourite Russian composers.

Offline Iota

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Re: Celebrating Gubaidulina's 90th
« Reply #38 on: October 25, 2021, 12:35:39 PM »
One of my favorite composers, Gubaidulina turned 90 yesterday. Right now, listening to her Second String Quartet (1987) by the Danish String Quartet, who are fantastic. (My first listen to this recording.)

About 9 minutes long, the piece opens with a unison "G" meditation, before venturing elsewhere. Some kind soul has synced the recording with the score, which is always welcome as one of the best educational tools.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RbyHVU3ny4c

--Bruce

Thanks, that's really quite something. I've listened to and been interested by various things from her over the years, without anything ever quite fully lighting up for me. But that seems to have nudged the moment somewhat closer.  :)

Online vers la flamme

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Re: Gubaidulina's Canticle
« Reply #39 on: October 25, 2021, 01:16:58 PM »
Happy birthday to Ms. Gubaidulina. Age 90, amazing. I have yet to really click with any of her music, but I would love to hear more of it. The only disc I have is The Canticle of the Sun with Rostropovich on EMI, and I think it may be a tad too esoteric for me. Anyone have any recommendations?

According to Wikipedia, she idolizes Anton Webern and J.S. Bach—two of my favorite composers.