Author Topic: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!  (Read 17893 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4920
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #20 on: January 10, 2009, 12:54:56 AM »
It was a bit late last night (having listened to Alan Bush's Second Symphony through twice) by the time I got round to Wordsworth's Second Symphony, but my attention was held throughout and I enjoyed this more than I recall having done so before. It is a sombre, searching and eloquent score which, I suspect, needs repeated listening to give up its secrets. Rubbra was certainly the other composer who came to mind at times. I will certainly be returning to Wordsworth's Second Symphony.

Oh please, no!!!  :-X :-\ :-[ :'(

I've always been able to completely ignore Wordsworth and not - I repeat: NOT - order for the Lyrita cd. You're not going to tell I was wrong all the time? And how can I play Wordsworth at all, given the fact that I bought three wonderful Lyrita cd's with Rubbra symphonies last month - and didn't even find time to play these?

Why? Don't you have any mercy with a poor working father of two little kids?  ;)  ;)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Dundonnell

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3599
  • Edmund Rubbra(1901-86)
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #21 on: January 10, 2009, 12:03:46 PM »
Oh please, no!!!  :-X :-\ :-[ :'(

I've always been able to completely ignore Wordsworth and not - I repeat: NOT - order for the Lyrita cd. You're not going to tell I was wrong all the time? And how can I play Wordsworth at all, given the fact that I bought three wonderful Lyrita cd's with Rubbra symphonies last month - and didn't even find time to play these?

Why? Don't you have any mercy with a poor working father of two little kids?  ;)  ;)

Yes, I am going to tell you that you were wrong all the time ;D

Since joining this forum I have (a) listened to a lot of my cds which had been stacked neatly on my shelves but had not been listened to for a long time
and (b) bought a lot of new cds.......all because of the recommendations of enthusiastic members here :)

The least I can do is to repay the compliment ;D ;D

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4920
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #22 on: February 08, 2009, 09:28:44 AM »
Well. I succumbed - and at least the Second is a fine symphony indeed:   ;) :)

                 
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Dundonnell

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3599
  • Edmund Rubbra(1901-86)
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #23 on: February 08, 2009, 09:59:35 AM »
And Congratulations on your 1000th Post :)

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4920
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #24 on: February 08, 2009, 10:34:42 AM »
And Congratulations on your 1000th Post :)

 :-X :-\ I missed it.  :-\ And that after at least 200 recent postings without much substance, just in order to get to the Magic Number.  ;) 0:)

Well, playing Wordsworth again, I start liking him more and more.  :)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Irons

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1785
  • Location: Surrey, UK
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #25 on: April 29, 2019, 10:52:21 PM »
Well. I succumbed - and at least the Second is a fine symphony indeed:   ;) :)

                 

So did I and it is. Listening, one word came to mind "epic". Not your typical British symphony. Although I agree with Dundonnell and Jeffrey in that there are similarities with Rubbra. Not British, or Germanic either but I would say more Russian. I haven't reread my post on the 5th String Quartet but I think I mentioned Shostakovich in relation to that work and I had the same thoughts with this symphony. I was expecting, especially after reading the CD notes, of the work being somewhat disjointed but I didn't find this one bit. The symphony sounded magnificent through my system - I own large speakers, Wordsworth uses percussion sparingly but with great effect. A wonderful symphony by "an unjustly neglected" composer (if there is one composer that fits that phrase then it is William Wordsworth!) 
« Last Edit: April 29, 2019, 10:59:42 PM by Irons »
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 16891
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #26 on: April 29, 2019, 11:28:09 PM »
So did I and it is. Listening, one word came to mind "epic". Not your typical British symphony. Although I agree with Dundonnell and Jeffrey in that there are similarities with Rubbra. Not British, or Germanic either but I would say more Russian. I haven't reread my post on the 5th String Quartet but I think I mentioned Shostakovich in relation to that work and I had the same thoughts with this symphony. I was expecting, especially after reading the CD notes, of the work being somewhat disjointed but I didn't find this one bit. The symphony sounded magnificent through my system - I own large speakers, Wordsworth uses percussion sparingly but with great effect. A wonderful symphony by "an unjustly neglected" composer (if there is one composer that fits that phrase then it is William Wordsworth!)

Very interested to hear your views, with which I very much agree.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2098
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #27 on: July 25, 2019, 06:26:46 PM »
Recently made a very favorable first acquaintance with Wordsworth’s Fourth Symphony from this new Toccata release:



I had previously tried a bit of Wordsworth’s 2nd Symphony on Lyrita, which seemed like a worthy work but a bit too “grey” for my taste. The 4th appealed to me quite a bit more. Wordsworth’s ideas and orchestration are sometimes starkly (late-) Sibelian and other time more individual and colorful (note the prominent use of xylophone). I found the threatening, march-like section that occupies the center of the one-movement work to be particularly gripping and memorable.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

  • Silver Subscriber
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 16891
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #28 on: July 25, 2019, 09:26:58 PM »
Recently made a very favorable first acquaintance with Wordsworth’s Fourth Symphony from this new Toccata release:



I had previously tried a bit of Wordsworth’s 2nd Symphony on Lyrita, which seemed like a worthy work but a bit too “grey” for my taste. The 4th appealed to me quite a bit more. Wordsworth’s ideas and orchestration are sometimes starkly (late-) Sibelian and other time more individual and colorful (note the prominent use of xylophone). I found the threatening, march-like section that occupies the center of the one-movement work to be particularly gripping and memorable.
Interesting Kyle. I must look out for No.4. I didn't like No.2 at first but it has grown on me over the years.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

SymphonicAddict

  • Guest
Re: William Wordsworth(1908-1988)-no, not the poet!
« Reply #29 on: August 26, 2019, 07:49:26 PM »
The symphonies 3 and 5 delighted me recently. Just hear the 1st movement from the 5th: mindblowing, quiet, intriguing, the composer with his own voice. As poetic as the works of his most famous relative. 1 y 2 were turgid (though not necessarily too bad), with no direction to these ears, above all the 1st, and in mono audio, didn't help much either. 4 was pretty good (remember the 'Arabesque-like' main theme), No. 8 so-so, maybe too solemn and with few action, just didn't catch me. If you are gonna start listening to them, 3 and 5 are the suggested choices.
« Last Edit: August 26, 2019, 07:51:18 PM by SymphonicAddict »