Author Topic: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)  (Read 10634 times)

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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #60 on: June 24, 2020, 02:47:20 PM »
Thankfully, no one wins in this but the music itself and as long as you’re listening, then this is all that matters at the end of the day. 8)

I couldn't disagree with this.  0:)
«Music is liquid architecture; architecture is frozen music.»

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #61 on: July 30, 2020, 10:25:58 AM »
Copied over from the WAYLTN thread:
'Stihira' by Shchedrin.
'Hymn for the Millenary of the Christianisation of Russia'.
A marvellous work and my favourite composition of his apart from the 1st Symphony. It is very Russian Orthodox sounding (it is largely orchestral although the theme is initially hummed by the male cellists) and should appeal to admirers of Hovhaness and Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov' (Coronation Scene). It is bizarrely coupled with violin concertos by Glazunov and Prokofiev but the link must be Rostropovich for whom it was written. Much use of chimes and gongs. It lasts 22 mins:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #62 on: July 30, 2020, 11:03:34 AM »
In March I heard that Ms. Mutter was infected with Covid-19. I hope she is getting better now.

Copied over from the WAYLTN thread:
'Stihira' by Shchedrin.
'Hymn for the Millenary of the Christianisation of Russia'.
A marvellous work and my favourite composition of his apart from the 1st Symphony. It is very Russian Orthodox sounding (it is largely orchestral although the theme is initially hummed by the male cellists) and should appeal to admirers of Hovhaness and Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov' (Coronation Scene). It is bizarrely coupled with violin concertos by Glazunov and Prokofiev but the link must be Rostropovich for whom it was written. Much use of chimes and gongs. It lasts 22 mins:



Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #63 on: July 30, 2020, 11:13:38 AM »
In March I heard that Ms. Mutter was infected with Covid-19. I hope she is getting better now.
Me too. She looks very young on the cover image.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #64 on: April 30, 2021, 03:16:37 PM »
I'm listening to Anna Karenina, the full ballet right now and thoroughly loving it!  It's so routed in Russian tradition with equal parts Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovitch.  How could anyone not love this????  The work was composed from 1970-1 and I highly recommend it!  It's evocative, energetic, atmospheric and dramatic.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #65 on: April 30, 2021, 03:31:49 PM »
I'm listening to Anna Karenina, the full ballet right now and thoroughly loving it!  It's so routed in Russian tradition with equal parts Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovitch.  How could anyone not love this????  The work was composed from 1970-1 and I highly recommend it!  It's evocative, energetic, atmospheric and dramatic.

Yes, it’s probably his most popular ballet, too. A fine work no doubt. I was less impressed with The Seagull as it felt kind of faceless. The Little Humpbacked Horse, the Carmen Suite and The Lady with the Lapdog were also quite good. I think I just listed all of his ballets...lol. Have you heard his Cello Concerto? I consider this one of his crowning achievements within all of the works I’ve heard so far, which has been many since I did a little survey of his music last year (or the year before). I haven’t really heard anything of his chamber music that is of interest and I still have yet to get around to his solo piano music.
Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #66 on: May 01, 2021, 04:43:03 AM »
Yes, it’s probably his most popular ballet, too. A fine work no doubt. I was less impressed with The Seagull as it felt kind of faceless. The Little Humpbacked Horse, the Carmen Suite and The Lady with the Lapdog were also quite good. I think I just listed all of his ballets...lol. Have you heard his Cello Concerto? I consider this one of his crowning achievements within all of the works I’ve heard so far, which has been many since I did a little survey of his music last year (or the year before). I haven’t really heard anything of his chamber music that is of interest and I still have yet to get around to his solo piano music.

I haven't heard his cello concerto so will add to my list.  Have you heard piano concertos or symphonies?  I remember liking the earlier soviet era ones quite a bit.  Obviously the shadow of his predecessors looms large but that's not a bad thing.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #67 on: May 01, 2021, 05:29:41 AM »
I haven't heard his cello concerto so will add to my list.  Have you heard piano concertos or symphonies?  I remember liking the earlier soviet era ones quite a bit.  Obviously the shadow of his predecessors looms large but that's not a bad thing.

I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!
Don’t forget your four A’s, folks: Alex, Arnie, Alban and Anton


Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #68 on: May 03, 2021, 11:10:49 PM »
I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!
.
The stand-out work for me is Symphony No.1, of which I own both (AFAIK) recordings. Like you I was very disappointed by Symphony No.2. I wish that Chandos would record Symphony No.1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #69 on: May 04, 2021, 04:58:33 AM »
I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!

I believe there is a third symphony but quite a few years separate No. 2 and 3.