At the end of the alphabet: Zemlinsky

Started by bhodges, October 16, 2007, 02:15:43 PM

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Maestro267

Youtube premiere I assume? The work is over 100 years old and has multiple recordings.

brewski

Quote from: Maestro267 on February 21, 2024, 12:36:45 PMYoutube premiere I assume? The work is over 100 years old and has multiple recordings.

Ah, thanks, my bad for using the word "premiere," which I changed to "broadcast."

-Bruce
"I set down a beautiful chord on paper—and suddenly it rusts."
—Alfred Schnittke (1934-1998)

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: brewski on February 21, 2024, 03:11:07 PMAh, thanks, my bad for using the word "premiere," which I changed to "broadcast."

-Bruce
Thanks for the heads up.  I have it on now (missed first 8 minutes).

PD
Pohjolas Daughter

Pohjolas Daughter

Well, that was lovely...very romantic...at times made me think of "The Sea" (perhaps the swelling and lush sound of the strings).

Sad that his music wasn't more appreciated (unlike his brother-in-law's Schoenberg)

PD
Pohjolas Daughter

Lisztianwagner

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on February 22, 2024, 06:49:23 AMWell, that was lovely...very romantic...at times made me think of "The Sea" (perhaps the swelling and lush sound of the strings).

Sad that his music wasn't more appreciated (unlike his brother-in-law's Schoenberg)

PD
Agreed; it also shows a rich and varied orchestral colour similar to Richard Strauss. Die Seejungfrau is such a wonderful piece, one of the most beautiful Zemlinsky's works.

Unfortunately he is a quite underrated composer (alas, Zemlinsky was the worst champion of his own music), but undoubtedly a great one!
"You cannot expect the Form before the Idea, for they will come into being together." - Arnold Schönberg

Roasted Swan

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on February 22, 2024, 06:49:23 AMWell, that was lovely...very romantic...at times made me think of "The Sea" (perhaps the swelling and lush sound of the strings).

Sad that his music wasn't more appreciated (unlike his brother-in-law's Schoenberg)

PD

The context of it being written as a kind of love-letter to Alma Mahler who Zemlinsky taught before she married Mahler is significant.  He was besotted with her - they got secretly engaged - but she left him.  The result in this work is the most yearning passionate score Zemlinsky ever wrote.  Compare it to his late quite objective and indeed stern works and the difference is striking.  It was only when Chailly recorded Seejungfrau for Decca (still one of the best versions I think) that most modern listeners  became aware of him as a composer in his own right rather than as just a footnote in Mahler's life.