Author Topic: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music  (Read 12684 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline pjme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1542
  • Location: Europa
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #80 on: August 03, 2022, 05:01:31 AM »
Honeggers Jeanne d'Arc in Brussels (not a Theremin, but the ondes Martenot....) The sound can sometimes be deceptively similar.

https://www.facebook.com/LaMonnaieDeMunt/videos/528260467751273/?_rdr
The ondiste is Philippe Arrieus

Isn't there an anvil in Bax' 3rd symphony and in Walton's Belshazar??

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2710
  • Location: Wales
  • Currently Listening to:
    Myaskovsky, Schnittke, Pettersson and others
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #81 on: August 03, 2022, 07:51:46 AM »
Yes. A single strike in the first movement of the former and a couple (but only within a few seconds of each other) in the latter.

Online ritter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8050
  • Raoul Dufy, "Tragédie, Comédie"
  • Location: La Villa y Corte
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #82 on: August 03, 2022, 11:32:08 AM »
Honeggers Jeanne d'Arc in Brussels (not a Theremin, but the ondes Martenot....) The sound can sometimes be deceptively similar.

https://www.facebook.com/LaMonnaieDeMunt/videos/528260467751273/?_rdr
The ondiste is Philippe Arrieus

Very interesting, pjme, thanks! I saw Jeanne d’Arc a couple of months ago fully staged here in Madrid, but ondes were barely audible. A pity!
ritter
-------------------------------------------------------------
« …tout cela qui prend forme et solidité, est sorti, ville et jardins, de ma tasse de thé. »

Offline KevinP

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1166
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #83 on: August 03, 2022, 01:55:23 PM »
Bill Russo's Three Pieces for Blues Band and Symphony Orchestra, and also his Street Music.

The odd instruments being harmonica, electric piano, electric bass and 'drums' in the popular sense.

Offline Peter Power Pop

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
    • Peter's Power Pop
  • Location: South Australia
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #84 on: August 03, 2022, 04:25:18 PM »
Weird instruments? For me, nothing beats Malcolm Arnold's Grand, Grand Overture, Op. 57. It's scored for three vacuum cleaners, one floor polisher, four rifles, and a full symphony orchestra.

https://youtu.be/6bHB3F6o3AY

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24797
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #85 on: August 03, 2022, 09:09:40 PM »
Honeggers Jeanne d'Arc in Brussels (not a Theremin, but the ondes Martenot....) The sound can sometimes be deceptively similar.

https://www.facebook.com/LaMonnaieDeMunt/videos/528260467751273/?_rdr
The ondiste is Philippe Arrieus

Isn't there an anvil in Bax' 3rd symphony and in Walton's Belshazar??

OK thanks - my mistake.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24797
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #86 on: August 03, 2022, 09:10:25 PM »
Weird instruments? For me, nothing beats Malcolm Arnold's Grand, Grand Overture, Op. 57. It's scored for three vacuum cleaners, one floor polisher, four rifles, and a full symphony orchestra.

https://youtu.be/6bHB3F6o3AY
I agree - good to see you back here.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline pjme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1542
  • Location: Europa
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #87 on: August 04, 2022, 12:13:50 AM »
Jon Leifs deserves a mention, I think.
I wasn't able to consult scores, but he does use anvils, stones, "lurs" (brass) in several scores ( the Saga- symphony, Hekla....).
YT has a good performance of his organ concerto from Stavanger.


Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2710
  • Location: Wales
  • Currently Listening to:
    Myaskovsky, Schnittke, Pettersson and others
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #88 on: August 04, 2022, 07:43:03 AM »
Erik Satie's ballet Parade includes a typewriter, a pistol, a lottery wheel and a "bottlephone"

Offline pjme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1542
  • Location: Europa
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #89 on: August 04, 2022, 09:28:15 AM »
Erik Satie's ballet Parade includes a typewriter, a pistol, a lottery wheel and a "bottlephone"
Ah, Satie! The "percussion section" of the orchestra has also "flaques sonores" - sound puddles.
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/i-iuk92GL9A" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/i-iuk92GL9A</a>

"piccolo, 2 flutes, 2 oboes, English horn, E♭ clarinet, 2 clarinets, 2 bassoons
2 horns, cornet, 2 trumpets, 3 trombones, tuba
timpani, triangle, snare drum, side drum, cymbals, bass drum, 2 sirens (high and low)
typewriter, tam-tam, tambourine, pistol, lottery wheel, slapstick, "flaques sonores"**, xylophone, bottlephone"

Offline Peter Power Pop

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
    • Peter's Power Pop
  • Location: South Australia
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #90 on: August 04, 2022, 03:15:01 PM »
I agree - good to see you back here.

Thanks, Vandermeister.

I went down a pop music rabbit hole for quite a while, but I'm now back listening to classical music. (I'm currently on a Scheherazade kick, and bought five Scheherazade CDs yesterday. Somebody stop me!)

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24797
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #91 on: August 05, 2022, 02:04:42 PM »
Thanks, Vandermeister.

I went down a pop music rabbit hole for quite a while, but I'm now back listening to classical music. (I'm currently on a Scheherazade kick, and bought five Scheherazade CDs yesterday. Somebody stop me!)
Excellent! Although I suspect that you need to buy many more to catch up with your Planets collection  8)
Scheherazade was the very first piece of classical music that I liked when I was about 14. My mother had an LP of it (Reiner, Chicago SO). I was humming it to myself at school one day when another boy said 'I know what that is...my mum also listens to it'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Peter Power Pop

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
    • Peter's Power Pop
  • Location: South Australia
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #92 on: August 05, 2022, 02:33:14 PM »
Excellent! Although I suspect that you need to buy many more to catch up with your Planets collection  8)
Scheherazade was the very first piece of classical music that I liked when I was about 14. My mother had an LP of it (Reiner, Chicago SO). I was humming it to myself at school one day when another boy said 'I know what that is...my mum also listens to it'.

I came late to the Scheherazade party. I was a very late developer with classical music. Here in Australia, I grew up listening to the Top 40 on AM radio. I only became interested in classical music because I'm a guitarist (bass guitar, to be precise) and had a "History of the Guitar" book that talked about the classical guitar. It led me to buying this as my first classical CD in about 1985 (I was 24):



From there, my listening grew to include more and more classical. Nowadays it depends on the mood I'm in as to what I'll listen to. At the moment, it's Scheherazade all the way.

Offline Peter Power Pop

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
    • Peter's Power Pop
  • Location: South Australia
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #93 on: August 05, 2022, 02:35:19 PM »
Excellent! Although I suspect that you need to buy many more to catch up with your Planets collection  8)
Scheherazade was the very first piece of classical music that I liked when I was about 14. My mother had an LP of it (Reiner, Chicago SO). I was humming it to myself at school one day when another boy said 'I know what that is...my mum also listens to it'.

I dare say a lot a mums were familiar the music of Scheherazade back then. Classical music used to be more of a thing than it is now.

Offline pjme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1542
  • Location: Europa
Re: "Weird" Instruments in Classical Music
« Reply #94 on: August 07, 2022, 03:32:18 AM »
Rimsky Korsakov - that made me think of Mlada , and the use of pan pipes in the Cleopatra-scene of the opera-ballet.