Author Topic: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)  (Read 79943 times)

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Offline Scion7

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #280 on: October 15, 2020, 04:20:01 AM »
No.

" He had a fluent command of English – a language he had learned from his mother as a child, but which he only mastered as an adult. "

I remember news on the beeb back in the day - a light Polish accent.
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Offline CRCulver

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #281 on: October 15, 2020, 10:52:09 AM »
I always got the impression that those videos were dubbed. His English is just too perfect.

There are plenty of videos where Lutoslawski is speaking extemporaneously and the audio perfectly matches his mouth, so no, obviously not dubbed.

It is not particularly astonishing that Lutoslawski could learn English so well. The Eastern European elites who came of age in the entre deux guerres or before often learned French or German to the same high standard, and Lutoslawski came from an aristocratic family. My question was only about how he managed to immerse himself in an English environment for a time, because this wasn’t covered in any of the biographies which I have seen.

Online vers la flamme

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #282 on: October 15, 2020, 04:02:13 PM »
There are plenty of videos where Lutoslawski is speaking extemporaneously and the audio perfectly matches his mouth, so no, obviously not dubbed.

It is not particularly astonishing that Lutoslawski could learn English so well. The Eastern European elites who came of age in the entre deux guerres or before often learned French or German to the same high standard, and Lutoslawski came from an aristocratic family. My question was only about how he managed to immerse himself in an English environment for a time, because this wasn’t covered in any of the biographies which I have seen.

Yeah, I don't know. Just a suspicion I had after watching this:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rdDE5owPUMc

The fact that I couldn't really read his lips due to the low resolution of the video didn't help. I had the same question as you; I couldn't reconcile his speaking as if he were someone who was totally immersed in the language, with what I know of his biography.

Offline CRCulver

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #283 on: October 16, 2020, 01:13:03 AM »
Watch this video, for instance:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GVlq6zihyjg

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #284 on: August 29, 2021, 07:29:15 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/cXQ1fgmUIPY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/cXQ1fgmUIPY</a>

I can't get enough of his Concerto for Orchestra. It encapsulates so much greatness, atmosphere and rich music. Gardner leading the hr-Sinfonieorchester succeeds at bringing all the personality this work has and offering a staggering rendition. One of my favorite works of the 20th century.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #285 on: August 29, 2021, 07:36:03 PM »
<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/cXQ1fgmUIPY" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/cXQ1fgmUIPY</a>

I can't get enough of his Concerto for Orchestra. It encapsulates so much greatness, atmosphere and rich music. Gardner leading the hr-Sinfonieorchester succeeds at bringing all the personality this work has and offering a staggering rendition. One of my favorite works of the 20th century.

It’s a nice work even if the composer disliked it. How do you feel about Lutosławski’s more mature works? Any favorites? I always said his song cycles were some of the finest of the later half of the 20th Century and I still feel this way. I’m coming around to his symphonies --- the 3rd and 4th are especially good.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #286 on: August 29, 2021, 08:01:58 PM »
It’s a nice work even if the composer disliked it. How do you feel about Lutosławski’s more mature works? Any favorites? I always said his song cycles were some of the finest of the later half of the 20th Century and I still feel this way. I’m coming around to his symphonies --- the 3rd and 4th are especially good.

Well, Luto wasn't having a good day if he claimed that! For me it's an utterly sensational creation. Besides the CfO, Partita for violin and orchestra, the Double Concerto for oboe and harp, all the symphonies, Livre, Mi-Parti, the String Quartet, the Cello Concerto, Musique funèbre, Symphonic Variations (I think this is early), Paganini Variations (in both versions), Preludes and Fugue for 13 strings, Les Espaces du Sommeil and Jeux Vénitiens are rather close to my tastes.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #287 on: August 29, 2021, 08:04:02 PM »
Well, Luto wasn't having a good day if he claimed that! For me it's an utterly sensational creation. Besides the CfO, Partita for violin and orchestra, the Double Concerto for oboe and harp, all the symphonies, Livre, Mi-Parti, the String Quartet, the Cello Concerto, Musique funèbre, Symphonic Variations (I think this is early), Paganini Variations (in both versions), Preludes and Fugue for 13 strings, Les Espaces du Sommeil and Jeux Vénitiens are rather close to my tastes.

All extremely fine works, indeed. Yeah, I think he was definitely wrong about his dismissal of this work for sure. It’s fabulous.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline Maestro267

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #288 on: August 30, 2021, 05:45:48 AM »
Probably he dismissed it cos it's his most famous work, and artists are always doing that, hating the thing that, while making them the most money, stifles them creatively and in the minds of others, as if the CfO was the only work he wrote worth anything. Obviously those of us in the know know that's vastly untrue, but among the mainstream populace it's different.

Online vers la flamme

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Re: Witold Lutoslawski (1913-1994)
« Reply #289 on: August 30, 2021, 12:54:02 PM »
It's certainly the only Lutoslawski work I've seen in concert.