Author Topic: Mozart  (Read 180211 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline amw

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4861
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1300 on: July 05, 2020, 04:47:49 PM »
I do not have a scan of that particular booklet but it may be helpful to use one of the several websites that have uploaded the libretto with English translations, e.g., http://www.murashev.com/opera/Le_nozze_di_Figaro_libretto_English_Italian

Offline mc ukrneal

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9138
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1301 on: July 05, 2020, 05:50:39 PM »
I do not have a scan of that particular booklet but it may be helpful to use one of the several websites that have uploaded the libretto with English translations, e.g., http://www.murashev.com/opera/Le_nozze_di_Figaro_libretto_English_Italian
Once the libretto is located, you (vers la flamme) can then cross reference with this: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Le_nozze_di_Figaro_(Georg_Solti_recording)

It gives the names for each track (which you can figure out) as well as any changes in the libretto. I think it should be a pretty straight-forward project.   I have the recording, but not a scan of the booklet, which is several hundred pages at least (it's a big one). SO unless you get lucky, a small project like this should get you the result you need.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Offline calyptorhynchus

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 964
  • Location: Canberra, Australia
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1302 on: July 05, 2020, 08:04:28 PM »
Perhaps someone can help me out here...

I purchased a few months ago the following recording of Le Nozze di Figaro:

I got it used, quite cheaply, only to find out once I received it that the booklet w/ libretto was missing. I was wondering if anyone here had a scan of the booklet for me to read while listening? It doesn't have to be perfect quality, I only request that it be legible. Any help here would be greatly appreciated!

There should be a few online librettos, but bear in mind that there are a couple of numbers in the Marriage that often get omitted, and some performances slightly reorder the scenes towards the end.

Online vers la flamme

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3192
  • Location: Atlanta
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1303 on: July 06, 2020, 01:21:28 AM »
Thanks everyone! This should be sufficient.

There should be a few online librettos, but bear in mind that there are a couple of numbers in the Marriage that often get omitted, and some performances slightly reorder the scenes towards the end.

Ah, this is why I was concerned about finding a booklet for this particular recording, but with a little bit of effort I should be able to figure it out well enough.

Offline Mahlerian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3320
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1304 on: July 06, 2020, 05:31:56 AM »
So where and when did you learn to read musical notations? Flute lessons? School? Just learned to do it at age 13 instead of playing with Legos?

I played viola for a few years, and sang in the school choir from elementary through middle school. I kind of grew up around written music, so it never seemed foreign to me. I taught myself things like transposing instruments and odd clefs later on when I became interested in following along in orchestral scores while listening to music.

How do you define "strikingly poor understanding of music theory"? I guess deep understanding of negative harmony is not the most important thing for pianists.

Not really knowing how to figure out intervals, that sort of thing.

As someone who makes music as hobby, I don't "need" to understanding music theory,but now that I do understand it much better than just 2 years ago boy does it help! It feels like having superpowers and I am just learning this stuff! So exciting! Now I want to get better at reading notes and then analyse works by J. S. Bach and hopefully learn to write fugues, my all time dream.

My graduate counterpoint class worked from simple 2-part counterpoint to 3-part fugue writing, in the course of a single semester. A number of people in the class hadn't had any training or practice in counterpoint before, and everyone was able to write a fugue by the end. Unfortunately, it's not something that's easy to teach yourself (I know that well from experience), but if you want, I could show you the books we used:



Fux is the classic text, of course, in spite of the fact that no one ever really composed this way. Mozart and Haydn would have studied these exact exercises.



For Baroque counterpoint and fugue writing, we used this text. You could conceivably start with it, but I don't think it would be recommended. You should have a bit of experience first.

Back when I was teaching myself, I used Fux, and also Schoenberg, who has an idiosyncratic take on tonal counterpoint:

"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline 71 dB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 9549
  • I'm not insensitive. I'm an INTJ/P.
    • Soundcloud
  • Location: Helsinki, Finland
  • Currently Listening to:
    I am revisiting my CD collection.
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1305 on: July 06, 2020, 10:30:13 AM »
I played viola for a few years, and sang in the school choir from elementary through middle school. I kind of grew up around written music, so it never seemed foreign to me. I taught myself things like transposing instruments and odd clefs later on when I became interested in following along in orchestral scores while listening to music.

Not really knowing how to figure out intervals, that sort of thing.

My graduate counterpoint class worked from simple 2-part counterpoint to 3-part fugue writing, in the course of a single semester. A number of people in the class hadn't had any training or practice in counterpoint before, and everyone was able to write a fugue by the end. Unfortunately, it's not something that's easy to teach yourself (I know that well from experience), but if you want, I could show you the books we used:



Fux is the classic text, of course, in spite of the fact that no one ever really composed this way. Mozart and Haydn would have studied these exact exercises.



For Baroque counterpoint and fugue writing, we used this text. You could conceivably start with it, but I don't think it would be recommended. You should have a bit of experience first.

Back when I was teaching myself, I used Fux, and also Schoenberg, who has an idiosyncratic take on tonal counterpoint:



Thanks for these. Time tell what I do.
That sounds surprising.
Why is that?
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW track "Jazzz"

Offline Mahlerian

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3320
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1306 on: July 07, 2020, 05:18:45 AM »
I think we've drifted pretty far off topic. I'll send you a PM.
"l do not consider my music as atonal, but rather as non-tonal. I feel the unity of all keys. Atonal music by modern composers admits of no key at all, no feeling of any definite center." - Arnold Schoenberg

Offline Mandryka

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 17521
Re: Mozart
« Reply #1307 on: November 26, 2020, 12:09:53 PM »


Tried K576. Not impressed personally.


http://heinrichvontrotta.blogspot.com/2019/04/giovanni-de-cecco-il-profeta-del.html

Interesting interview here, for example


Quote
. . .  each instrument has its own natural tactus. We think that the rhythm is decided only by the interpreter, but in reality it is determined by the interpreter with the instrument in the hall: the clavichord has a long reverb, so an excessive speed would generate a bad, confused sound. The interpreter cannot impose his own idea of ​​music on an instrument that already has its own "heartbeat". This is why it is essential to choose an instrument coeval to the music being addressed, because, for example, in the absence of the damper present in the fortepiano in the clavichord, which dries the reverb, the sound perspective is completely different: it is often the same instruments of the time that also reveal the plausible "metronomes" of the scores, while modern instruments can sometimes make us go "off course" without the prior knowledge.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen