Author Topic: Stephen Heller  (Read 20936 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #40 on: December 29, 2011, 08:14:10 AM »
Op. 57 Scherzo Fantastique

   This remarkable work runs to 22 pages and is marked prestissimo. As I don’t have the time to be memorising large chunks of music this is quite a challenge in itself – all those turnovers! Fortunately the occasional chord tied over six bars gives some respite from the precipitous tempo.
   There is a short (166 bars!) introduction followed by a strongly rhythmic main section that is certainly worthy of the title. This includes a phrase of three falling notes that is picked up in the central section, which turns to the major and from 3/8 (one in a bar) to 2/4 l’istesso tempo. Hushed fanfares soon burst out into a triumphal theme until eventually the three notes are flattened out in a repeated descent over hushed drumbeats. The music continues to a grand climax, ending in the tonic in the first inversion. The reprise of the main section follows varied almost immediately through different keys and breathlessly continuing through all the material until arriving back at the introductory theme, which again is treated in a completely novel way, so as to lead on to a final coda in 2/4 with the triumphal theme now dominant and the flattened out three note sequence crashing down in a glorious conclusion.
   All in all, this must surely be one of the finest romantic pieces of its type and I can only plead with the great pianists of today to take it to their hearts, put it into their repertoires and give us some recordings.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #41 on: January 01, 2012, 08:34:42 AM »
Op.115 3 Ballades

To avoid confusion with Chopin these would better be thought of as 'Contes' or 'Folk Tales' in the manner of Medtner although Heller uses his own particular format for these pieces. Basically the tale is told twice but the second telling is embellished in various ways, that is it may be all or partially in a different key, the pitch or keyboard layout of many bars is different and extra bars are inserted as though to add further anecdotes. This almost totally removes the feeling of repetition (I've often wished that Grieg had done this in his Lyric Pieces). After the 'repeat' a coda winds up each piece.

These Ballades are in print separately from Schott and are well worth acquiring if you're looking for something a little different (I actually acquired them from three different sources).
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #42 on: January 01, 2012, 11:50:50 AM »
Just a little review of a few missing works from this part of Heller's output for which I can only quote Bardedette:

(6) Two Cahiers (Op. 114) contain a very fine prelude—as, indeed, are all Heller's preludes—a piece with a title borrowed from Schumann (Kinderscenen), which is charming and full of simplicity, and a Presto Scherzoso, which is not quite up to the mark of the Scherzos we have already discussed.
(7) Op. 111, called Morceaux de ballet, is a beautiful collection, and quite in the symphonic style. Well scored, they would make a remarkable intermezzo, especially if the third piece of Op. 118 were added as a finale. This last—will the composer forgive us for saying so ?—is a veritable show-piece, very difficult and very effective. It could, however, be scored for orchestra, and would make a fine ending to Op. 111, of which the conclusion is pianissimo. The other pieces of Op. 118, called Boutade and Feuillet d'Album, are very .short. The latter is a very pretty Song without Words.

In addition are the two studies Op.116.

Op.118 no.1 is entitled 'Air de Ballet'. Judging by the quality of Heller's other works from this period, the recovery of the above opera would be well worth while.
Op.117, I will deal with next.

« Last Edit: January 02, 2012, 01:09:31 PM by Ten thumbs »
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #43 on: January 02, 2012, 01:17:47 PM »
Op.117 3 Preludes

These are BIG preludes!
1. Heller's answer to the C Major Prelude - something of a cross between Bach and Debussy (Think of Pour le Piano and you'll get the idea).

2. In A minor this is a stormy affair that begins with violent flourish. A melody built on this follows woven around persistent triads in mid-keyboard. The music pauses and the flourish introduces a free fantasy on the basic melodic elements.

3. In G major this returns to the format of the Ballades. It is a subdued Andante con moto that is annoyingly tricky to play.

These preludes are also availabel as a set from Schott. The first would make an excellent show piece,
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #44 on: January 04, 2012, 12:41:43 PM »
Op.119 32 Preludes for Lili

The title refers to Lili Schönemann, a young lady on whom Goethe had a crush. Heller tells us that he thinks of her as a child and these preludes are clearly composed for the enjoyment of children. Not, I must stress, specifically for their instruction.

Although written for small hands, this music is hardly suitable for beginners. However, they would provide a strong indicator of talent. They include such techniques as overlapping of hands and playing one hand above the other, and also require a considerable gift for expression.

It is Heller's idiosyncratic modular compositional method that makes these pieces possible - so much is packed into only a few bars. Yet it must be confessed that, whilst providing temporary delight they do not linger on the memory. Still, a real sinecure for the fatigued pianist! How can you stop, once begun?
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #45 on: January 09, 2012, 07:02:31 AM »
Op.120 7 Lieder (1867)

These seven lieder (or melodies) are strangely untitled. I say strangely because they clearly form a cycle and ought to be played as such. They are headed by a poem of Goethe’s that tells us that these are reflections on the past. It is a shame that none of the biographical detail on the internet (not even Barbedette) tell us anything of Heller’s emotional attachments. Although he remained unmarried, many of his oeuvres are dedicated to women and publishing his Op.119 preludes as for Lili suggests that he was heterosexual. Somewhere, one suspects, was a hidden disappointment.

1. The cycle begins with a haunting melody in E minor, which ends suddenly and magically in the major.
2. An allegro vivo in E that quickly moves into Ab and then through a series of lively phrases to a calmer close (molto meno mosso). Then again, this time remaining in E and so to a coda ending on the melodic note G#.
3. Allegro in C# minor – a beautiful brooding piece that finally fades away to close on a bare C# in the lower keyboard.
4. C# becomes Db and a curiously chromatic melody demands the attention. Its winds its way, becoming more syncopated until it breaks out into a dramatic recitative. The melody returns, receiving an added backing of triplet chords, first solo and then in octaves building to a high romantic climax that Heller bursts with a mocking laugh (how foolish we once were!).
5. For this, Heller switches to F and gives an engaging little tune with a dotted rhythm. An episode marked quasi parlando leads to an emphatic close. A second verse follows, much altered but following the same lines.
6. This is headed ‘Antwort’ (answer) and is yet a third verse, even more changed but leading eventually to the same ending. What the answer is you'll have to guess.
7. The music returns to Bb minor (the equivalent of Db) and begins with a dramatic and memorable theme comprising rising and falling dotted arpeggios. A short almost chorale like lament then leads into a fleeting memory of happier days before returning. The opening theme is then followed by a tumultuous reincarnation in triplets. Once again the happier mood attempts to reassert itself ( with insistent falling arpeggios reminiscent of the end of Schubert’s Sonata D.958) but Eb minor stamps itself on the conclusion.

This last piece alone is a masterpiece worthy to stand beside anything of its kind by either Schumann or Brahms, and the whole cycle has an emotional depth that deserves far more respect than it receives. It can be found on Andreas Meyer-Hermann’s selection of Heller’s works.
Maybe, quoting Goethe, it should be billed as Flowers from the Past, or something like that.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #46 on: January 13, 2012, 09:51:09 AM »
Op.121 3 Piano Pieces

I haven’t found sheet music for this but have it recorded by Ilona Prunyi.
These appear to be separate works

1. Ballade. This follows a similar pattern to the earlier ballades. It makes sense really to have verses with different words. The opening sounds like a question that returns at the end only to be stamped out ruthlessly. For once I’m having to listen to Heller’s music from the outside.
2. Conte. Now we do have a story and it makes a more substantial form than a ballade. Heller opens with a kind of narration, which then develops and the piece passes through several impressionistic episodes in a magical mystery tour before returning to the opening bars and the conclusion.
3. Rêverie de Gondolier. The gondolier sings quietly to himself, strumming on his guitar, while other boats drift past on the rippling waters – it’s all there and very beautifully done too, a real gem.

A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #47 on: January 22, 2012, 06:55:42 AM »
Op.122 Valses-Rêveries

Unusually this work has no dedication. Maybe it was composed to provide some light relief to amateur pianists!

The set comprises nine waltzes but I won’t comment on them individually. They inhabit a strange world that is in part Schubertian, in part Romantic and in part post-Romantic. The key relationships strongly suggest continuity and the set can be played through in about fifteen minutes. Very enjoyable with interesting passages but may not come over as too exciting to the listener.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #48 on: January 26, 2012, 02:40:10 PM »
Op.123 Feuilles Volantes

This work must surely place Heller amongst the avant-garde of his day. Even Barbadette had difficulties with it, describing it as vague. Had the word been available to him, he might have written impressionist, although this is not yet the impressionism of Debussy. Nevertheless, this music belongs to the post-Romantic and is one of the most advanced piano compositions to be composed before 1870. (One must look to the young generation – Brahms was retrograde compared with this and late Liszt was yet to come.)
Feuilles Volantes is divided into five parts but is best viewed as a whole. It is a kaleidoscope of soundscapes that describe leaves blown by the wind. At one point we hear a particularly windswept cuckoo!
I dare say those who prefer composers to sprinkle pointless notes all over the keyboard will have their complaints. Heller does not waste notes and traditional development is absent. However, there are musical elements that unite the work, such as the opening tied notes – BCB, a shape that recurs several times to emerge at the end as a persistent phrase – CCDCC over the F major tonality giving the whole a strong sense of closure.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #49 on: January 26, 2012, 02:41:59 PM »
Op.124 Kinderszenen

This is an obvious reference back to Schumann. However, although this cycle is suitable for intermediate pianists, it is not specifically for children; it is more a reminiscence. The individual pieces have no titles.
1. A reminder of Schumann himself. This has the advantage of showing how different the rest of the work is.
2. An allegro vivo that expresses outdoor fun and games.
3. More serious pursuits with the introduction of a persistent dissonance. One imagines the children escaping before discovery!
4. Heller’s version of the hobbyhorse? More sedate than Schumann’s and using the repeated resolution FBbC to FAC.
5. A cheerful skipping game that nevertheless evolves into some big leaps.
6. A quiet reflection. Heller gives this a repeat, which works because of the minor- major shift.
7. This ought to be classic on its own. A slow stately melody with ethereal staccato turns in the upper keyboard. First mF then repeated P. A middle section follows comprising very rapid parallel thirds, at first parlando, then with increasing agitation until the crisis passes and the music drops down to resume the magic of the opening.
8. This is another lively piece that is, I think, re-harmonised Haydn, along the lines of Prokofiev’s Classical Symphony.
9. A beautifully sad lament, employing minimal means. Heller adds the instructions plintivo and tristamente but they are hardly necessary.
10. This is a romp but watch out! On page two comes the reprimand and possible a slipper. All is reduced to a repeated E and then Schumann returns and – the romp resumes but this time the children heed a wagging finger. It’s time for bed and, with a few asides, they tiptoe off in that direction.

Whilst these pieces are great fun, one should not overlook the originality of the writing. This kind of music only became widespread much later.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #50 on: February 01, 2012, 04:17:23 AM »
Op.125 24 Études d’Expression et de Rhythme

Heller now produces a further set of relatively easy studies for beginners. This may have been to raise income (the downloaded edition I have is Russian) but he takes the opportunity to update the musical language to the latest idiom.
Obviously these are not meant for concert performance (at least not for adults) but of interest is the final study – La Leçon in which the master (Le Maitre) demonstrates a five finger exercise and the pupil (L’elève) stumbles over reproducing it. The lesson continues until ‘Le Maitre exit.’ The pupil then gallops off faultlessly (we hope) an excerpt from the 9th study. This appears to be the progenitor of such frolics.


The next opus : 3 Overtures is going to require some work, so I will deal with each overture individually.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #51 on: February 10, 2012, 12:00:52 PM »
Op.126.1 Overture – Of a Drama

Whilst Heller was never tempted into orchestral scoring and resented what he called the forced labours of producing works based on popular operas he presumably did enjoy the musical theatre.  These overtures exhibit once again the composer’s assurance when working in larger forms. Unlike Alkan’s Overture they are not intended as studies and they are therefore concentrated music without frills.

This first begins Andante can expressione and, as we shall see, one should not be tempted to take this too quickly (crotchet = 80 in indicated). The allegro that follows must be exactly twice as fast and this will be noticed when ideas from the opening appear again at double speed. The main body follows Heller’s version of sonata form: a sequence of ideas (the 2nd subject is derived from the introduction, transformed into the major) is followed by a relatively short development. The recapitulation follows the original sequence but is entirely recomposed.
Heller mimics an orchestra through dynamic and textural contrasts and, as is appropriate, this music is bold and dramatic. It is exciting to play and definitely goes into my hit list.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #52 on: February 14, 2012, 08:58:03 AM »
Opus126.2 Overture – Of a Spectacle
(The printed score is translated as ‘Of a Comedy' but this is plainly wrong – Schauspiel).

This is marked allegro from the start and remains so with many fluctuations, beginning sereno but soon becoming vivo and eventually con fuoco and stringendo before fading to let the storm begin (Orage).
Here is an outburst of thunder and lightning that is well worth noting under ‘weather’ music and it increases Heller’s credentials as one of the progenitors of impressionism in music.
After the tempest has subsided there is a curious little waltz before a reprise of the opening material altered almost beyond recognition. Nevertheless the stringendo section is reached once more and increased to accelerando and a triumphant ending.

A very fine piece. Could well be classed as a rhapsody.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #53 on: February 20, 2012, 02:34:23 PM »
Op.127 Freischütz Studies

Heller had a lifelong fascination with Weber’s opera, which sadly is not so often performed today, possibly because it includes spoken dialogue (it was done at last year’s proms with Berlioz’s recits.). Nevertheless, it remains one of the classics of the musical stage and the first question I ask here is, do these studies make me want to know it better? The answer is unequivocally, yes.

1. Allgro molto. I’ve said I’m not into grand studies but here the drama unfolds but does not overstay its welcome. This study is perfectly proportioned and ends with a tour de force of alternating octaves.
2. Allegro grazioso. A delightful treatment of the rustic dance melody with interwoven hands that develops into a climax whence a florid passage leads into a quasi cadenza before the simplicity of the opening returns to end in an elegant curtsey.
3. Allegro con fuoco. More tempestuous music but hidden within is an arrangement of a most beautiful aria. Even playing this section on its own creates a few moments of sheer magic.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #54 on: February 22, 2012, 02:04:54 PM »
Op.128 Im Walde (New series) (1871)

In this second set of forest scenes, Heller makes some references to Schumann in his titles, although the musical language is now quite different. One thing to note is that although this edition in German, it was also published in Paris and this music is essentially French. It is interesting that the first exhibition by those artists who were to become known as Impressionists took place in 1874. There is much in this music that reflects the same kind of sensibility.
1) Eintritt
Mässige bewegung mit unbesorgtem Ausdruck
This seems to express the traveller strolling into the woods with no concern for what he might find there. Two ideas are introduced and then interlocked in the modular fashion so common in Heller’s work.
2) Waldgeflüster. (Forest Whispers)
Rasch, heinlich und innig
This is the magic of the woods, expressed in fluttering staccato arpeggios and tiny snatches of static syncopated chords. A very impressionistic vision.
3) Waidmannslust (not part of Berlin! Presumably the Huntsman’s Joy)
Sehr lebhaft, feurig.
After an extended and rousing exposition of the main ideas they are rebuilt in a wonderfully post-Romantic mid-section that begins pp and gradually builds to a recapitulation opening ff, after which the huntsman rides off into the distance.
4) Einsame Blume (Solitary Bloom)
Etwas langsam Zart und innig
Heller reduces Schumann’s flowers to one and the music almost to a single line, a stunning expression of loneliness. Note how the rising climaxes in the first section become falling ones towards the end and the melody goes round and round until it seems to represent endless despair.
5) Waldsage (Legend of the Woods)
Schnell, in erzëhbendem  Tone (as a narration)
The heart of the forest is not a quiet place – rushing sounds and trumpet fanfares prepare us for initiation – a hymn-like theme enveloped in mystery – the music then leads the listener out again before rushing away into silence.
6) Verfolgtes Eichhörnchen
Sehr rasch-behend
These dashing squirrels are a nice touch. They leap about in the treetops and once again we are in the realms of pure impressionism, and also pure genius.
7) Rückwanderung (Wandering back)
Lebhaft; heiter, zufrieden
The sense of satisfaction is heightened by putting the tramp of footsteps into 3/4 time. After a chromatic interlude, the forest whispers are heard again. The retreat continues until footsteps and whispers become interlocked in a triumphant conclusion.

One of the finest piano cycles from the 19th Century. Pity it hasn’t been recorded more often.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #55 on: February 26, 2012, 07:58:55 AM »
Op.128 2 Impromptus

These have been recorded by Ilona Prunyi on Hungaroton, who naturally want to claim Heller as a Hungarian-French composer. Heller has indeed unassumingly taken a position right at the heart of the French piano tradition and, as neither Cesar Franck nor Saint-Saens composed extensively for the piano that was a position of some importance. The following quotation gives some food for thought and reminds me that I ought to investigate Dvoják’s piano music further.
 
“Musically, Heller progressed from being outright German and Viennese to being securely and comfortably French. In his later years, he began to exhibit Czech characteristics and some of his latest works greatly resemble those of Janácek and even Dvorák. Because of the volume and presence of his work, he is thought to have had an influence on both Fauré and Chabrier.” ~ Michael Morrison, Rovi

Be that as it may, the Frenchness of these impromptus is indisputable.
1) Everything is given up to pleasure of sound, from the whirling triplets of the opening to the drooping melody of the central section. Finally, the piece curls its way upwards into an exquisite conclusion. Quite worthy to stand alongside any impromptu ever composed.
2) The perpetual motion of the principal idea suggests a spinning song. When this breaks off, the music takes a walk after the fashion of the ‘Promenades d’un Solitaire’. This amble is interrupted by short bursts of very fast dance music (marked Presto). The wheel resumes its round and then, after a few further footsteps, accelerates into silence.

A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Leo K.

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1505
  • Author of 'False Barnyard'
    • Conceptual Music
  • Currently Listening to:
    Sibelius, Shostakovich, Prokofiev, Bach
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #56 on: February 26, 2012, 10:30:18 AM »
I'm very entranced by this recording, Heller's sound has a certain mood I can't describe in words, but it draws me to his work.

Excellant notes in this thread! Thanks  8)



« Last Edit: February 26, 2012, 11:12:00 AM by Leo K »

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #57 on: February 26, 2012, 02:52:31 PM »
I just noticed that I missed this one out!

Opus126.3 Overture – Of a Comic Opera

Naturally this is a much more good-natured work but mood in music has no correlation with quality. Quite appropriately, it is marked Allegro giocoso with a clearly defined second subject (meno mosso). Major keys remain in the ascendancy throughout, even in the fortissimo con fuoco that begins the development. The only time they are questioned is in the odd little lusingando that announces the recapitulation. As ever, this is reworked and it leads to an extended coda that is fun and games right to the end. Very exhilarating.

Due to their nature, these three overtures would make a good complement to the Brahms Rhapsodies, Op.79.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #58 on: February 27, 2012, 09:21:24 AM »
I'm very entranced by this recording, Heller's sound has a certain mood I can't describe in words, but it draws me to his work.

Excellant notes in this thread! Thanks  8)



Thanks for your encouragement. This is the recording that BobsterLobster found so boring and that hasn't encouraged me to buy it, although to be honest I want to approach Op.150 fresh. BobsterLobster seems to be under the illusion that these preludes were written for instruction, like Chopin's I suppose! He calls them unoriginal without being capable of quoting any precedent.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.

Offline Ten thumbs

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1444
Re: Stephen Heller
« Reply #59 on: February 29, 2012, 11:02:44 AM »
Op.130 33 Variations on a Theme of Beethoven (1871)

This is the theme used by Beethoven for his variations WoO80 (1806). How well these variations were known in 1871, I don’t know but Heller set himself the challenge of expanding on them. Each of Beethoven’s variations concentrates on a particular aspect of piano technique and Heller concentrates on style instead. The difference is immediately obvious visually in the score. Heller’s notes are clearly more broken up and widespread, as one might expect, in view of Romantic tradition. Nevertheless he does respect the master and makes use of material from:
Symphony No.9 (v21 and v22)
Symphony No.5 (v28 and v29)
Piano Trio Op1.3 (v32)
As you will hear, some of the variations are paired, i.e.
v4 & v5; v6 & v7; v9 & v10; v11 (C maj) & v12 (A min); v13 & v14
v17 & v18; v23 & v24 (da capo ad lib); v26 & v27
Heller also turns to the major key more often, as in V13 – v16, v25 – v27 and a scherzando finale following v33. Also v19 is in A major and v24 in C – I think the da capo is better played from a structural point of view.

All in all this is great fun and Beethoven buffs should love it. The idea of playing both sets back to back may however prove a bit much for the listener. This set alone takes about 18 minutes.
A day may be a destiny; for life
Lives in but little—but that little teems
With some one chance, the balance of all time:
A look—a word—and we are wholly changed.