Johann Strauss Sohn (1825-1899)

Started by Lisztianwagner, December 16, 2011, 12:15:23 PM

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cilgwyn

Agreed about Karajan. I should have mentioned him. Regarding Offenbach,I'm not a huge fan;but I do rather like the Plasson emi recording of 'Orpheus in the Underworld'. I had the Lps set as a teenager. His other operetta's are a bit too frivolous for me & probably work better on stage anyway.
  I particularly like Boskovsky in Strauss's orchestral music.He had just the right touch.

springrite

Quote from: Lisztianwagner on December 27, 2011, 05:14:10 AM
Programme of the next New Year's Concert:

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=688269&album_group=8

I am glad for the many Josef Strauss works selected. He is in many ways the equal or more of his older brother, maybe not in terms of melodies but otherwise a very good composer.

The non-Strausses, save Tchaikovsky, are names I have never heard of. Should be fun.
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

Lisztianwagner

Quote from: springrite on December 28, 2011, 06:48:36 AM
I am glad for the many Josef Strauss works selected. He is in many ways the equal or more of his older brother, maybe not in terms of melodies but otherwise a very good composer.

The non-Strausses, save Tchaikovsky, are names I have never heard of. Should be fun.

I agree, Josef was certainly a very fine and inspired composer; his music sounds more melancholic than Johann's, especially the waltzes (Delirien, Sphären-Klänge, Transaktionen etc.), but though it's very poetical and beautiful, and prone to introspection.

About the others:
Karl Michael Ziehrer was an Austrian composer, contemporary of the Strausses and one of the fiercest rivals of the viennese family, author of waltzes, polkas, maches and operettas.
Josef Hellmesberger was another Austrian composer, first hofkapellmeister at the Vienna Court Opera, and from 1901 to 1903 he was principal conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic, mainly known for his operettas.
Hans Christian Lumbye wrote waltzes, polkas, mazurkas and galops as well, but he was Danish.
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Mirror Image

Quote from: Lisztianwagner on December 27, 2011, 11:13:06 AM
Unfortunately, Strauss never used the hammer for his music, so I can't strike you with Strauss hammer ;D

Joking aside, I'm sorry to read this, because I've always found Strausses works very powerfully emotional, enchanting and not boring at all; maybe those compositions can't be as deep, haunting and thrilling as Wagner's, Mahler's or Koechlin's one are (Koechlin in your case), but that is the magic of music: it can show its power and its beauty in many different ways.
Anyway I respect your opinion :)

:P

I understand your points and I respect your opinion too. I guess J. Strauss is okay for some light listening, but usually when I want to hear something light I turn to Stravinsky's Neoclassical period, but even this period produced works that were profound. I'm thinking of the last movement of Apollo and the Mass in particular.

Lisztianwagner

Quote from: cilgwyn on December 28, 2011, 06:41:38 AM
  I particularly like Boskovsky in Strauss's orchestral music.He had just the right touch.

Definitely, very well said :)

"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

cilgwyn

I remember my grandmother had an Lp of Boskovsky playing Schubert's lovely 'Trout' quintet (as it's popularly known) with members of the Vienna Octet.(I think it was a 'chunky' Decca 10" ffrr!)  A work which share's Johann Strauss's melodic wit & gracefulness. I'm not sure if the recording is available on cd,but it was a fine performance.
Boskovsky certainly had the credentials!

Brian

Quote from: springrite on December 28, 2011, 06:48:36 AM
The non-Strausses, save Tchaikovsky, are names I have never heard of. Should be fun.

Hellmesberger's 'diabolique' is absolutely superb. I believe it has appeared in the concerts relatively recently - maybe under Ozawa.

I agree with mc ukrneal, by the way: the csardas and waltz from Ritter Pasman are two of J. Strauss' most treasurable gems. Every Strauss fan ought to know and love them. The fake waltz which dissipates into midair in the introduction to Pasman-walzer is too witty.

Lisztianwagner

Quote from: Brian on December 29, 2011, 03:00:55 PM
Hellmesberger's 'diabolique' is absolutely superb. I believe it has appeared in the concerts relatively recently - maybe under Ozawa.

I agree with mc ukrneal, by the way: the csardas and waltz from Ritter Pasman are two of J. Strauss' most treasurable gems. Every Strauss fan ought to know and love them. The fake waltz which dissipates into midair in the introduction to Pasman-walzer is too witty.

Very good memory :) As a matter of fact, Hellmesberger's Diabolique was played by Ozawa & Vienna Phil in the New Year's Concert 2002.

I agree as well, those works are incredibly stunning, especially the waltz; Strauss certainly had a special gift to extract beautiful pieces from his operettas (or in this case, opera).
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

springrite

Lots of Strauss waltzes at the upcoming Beijing New Year's Concert, with the Budapest Festival Orchestra under Fischer. Should be a stunner!
Do what I must do, and let what must happen happen.

mc ukrneal

Quote from: Lisztianwagner on December 28, 2011, 07:55:57 AM
I agree, Josef was certainly a very fine and inspired composer; his music sounds more melancholic than Johann's, especially the waltzes (Delirien, Sphären-Klänge, Transaktionen etc.), but though it's very poetical and beautiful, and prone to introspection.

About the others:
Karl Michael Ziehrer was an Austrian composer, contemporary of the Strausses and one of the fiercest rivals of the viennese family, author of waltzes, polkas, maches and operettas.
Josef Hellmesberger was another Austrian composer, first hofkapellmeister at the Vienna Court Opera, and from 1901 to 1903 he was principal conductor of the Vienna Philharmonic, mainly known for his operettas.
Hans Christian Lumbye wrote waltzes, polkas, mazurkas and galops as well, but he was Danish.
There is also Waldteufel and Komzak. Bilse is even further off the beaten track (a CPO disc). Lanner was one of the first with the waltz in its current form.
Be kind to your fellow posters!!

Lisztianwagner

The Wiener Neujahrskonzert was absolutely outastanding today! I had no doubt that Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker would give an incredibly powerful and deeply emotional performance, full of beauty and orchestral brilliance! :D The programme of concert was amazing, I really enjoyed it; they played many stunning and rare pieces.....Rathausball Tanze, Vaterlandischer-Marsch, Entweder-oder!! And the presence of both Lumbye and Tchaikovsky added much passion and colour.
But surely, I couldn't do without getting excited when I listened to the trembling of the violins in An der Schonen Blauen Donau. ;D
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Florestan

Quote from: Lisztianwagner on January 01, 2012, 10:01:00 AM
The Wiener Neujahrskonzert was absolutely outastanding today! I had no doubt that Jansons & Wiener Philharmoniker would give an incredibly powerful and deeply emotional performance, full of beauty and orchestral brilliance! :D The programme of concert was amazing, I really enjoyed it; they played many stunning and rare pieces.....Rathausball Tanze, Vaterlandischer-Marsch, Entweder-oder!! And the presence of both Lumbye and Tchaikovsky added much passion and colour.
But surely, I couldn't do without getting excited when I listened to the trembling of the violins in An der Schonen Blauen Donau. ;D

I agree, excellent choices and performance. For me the winners were "Feuerfest"  and "Copenhagen Steam Railway Galop" - absolutely delicious and charming.
I love Italian opera – it's so reckless. Damn Wagner, and his bellowings at Fate and Death. Damn Debussy, and his averted face. I like the Italians who run all on impulse, and don't care about their immortal souls, and don't worry about the ultimate — D. H. Lawrence

madaboutmahler

Quote from: Florestan on January 03, 2012, 05:50:34 AM
Copenhagen Steam Railway Galop"

I was addicted to that piece a few years ago! :D
"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven

Lisztianwagner

#33
Quote from: Florestan on January 03, 2012, 05:50:34 AM
I agree, excellent choices and performance. For me the winners were "Feuerfest"  and "Copenhagen Steam Railway Galop" - absolutely delicious and charming.

Absolutely; especially Jansons must have enjoyed the Feuerfest-Polka very much considering how he skipped while he was beating the hammers ;)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=N4pMVJixbKE
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Lisztianwagner

Briefly, Happy Birthday to the first violin of the Wiener Philharmoniker Erich Schagerl :)
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Lisztianwagner

At the Neujahrskonzert 2006, the end of Eduard Strauss' polka Telephon op. 165 was interrupted by a phone-call as well; but unlike the recent performance of Mahler No.9 at Lincoln Center, it was all settled ;D Stroke of genius from Mariss Jansons!
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yCHRvu4qDWQ
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Lisztianwagner

Johann Strauss is known mainly as a composer of dancing music (waltzes, polkas, marches, quadrilles) and operettas; but he also wrote some beautifully expressive, passionate, delightful romances for orchestra and cello; such absolutely brilliant pieces! ;D

http://www.youtube.com/v/JT-maayVP_M
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

madaboutmahler

"Music is ... A higher revelation than all Wisdom & Philosophy"
— Ludwig van Beethoven

Lisztianwagner

Quote from: madaboutmahler on September 06, 2012, 01:38:00 PM
Lovely piece, Ilaria! :)

Thank you, Daniel, I'm glad you liked it. :)

Another enchanting example, Dolci Pianti:

http://www.youtube.com/v/7GJFcgTzR8c
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Lisztianwagner

To celebrate Johann Strauss' birthday....der Walzer aller Walzer! ;D

http://www.youtube.com/v/sP0r917EX-8
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler