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General Harpsichord and Clavichord Thread

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Geo Dude:
This is a place for harpsichord/clavichord fanatics to discuss recommended (and not-so-recommended) recordings, great musicians, schools of harpsichord (or clavichord) playing, and anything else of relevance that comes to mind.

Let's get started.

Geo Dude:
Any recommendations on great recordings by Leonhardt?  For that matter, what are some of the elements that define his style and that of the 'Leonhardt School' I've heard about here?

For that matter, while the harpsichord is usually tied in most minds to the baroque era, some early classical era material also employed the harpsichord -- Haydn keyboard sonata sets that many people have been enjoying lately come to mind.  Do any specialists have tips on classical era composers and recordings that employ the harpsichord?

Josquin des Prez:

--- Quote from: Geo Dude on January 16, 2012, 09:05:49 AM ---For that matter, while the harpsichord is usually tied in most minds to the baroque era, some early classical era material also employed the harpsichord -- Haydn keyboard sonata sets that many people have been enjoying lately come to mind.  Do any specialists have tips on classical era composers and recordings that employ the harpsichord?

--- End quote ---

Many of the earlier classical composers wrote extensively for the harpsichord, but their music still hark back to the baroque in many ways.

Some of those composers include Soler and Duphly, which used the language of Scarlatti and Rameau respectively mixed with many classical elements. Then we have Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, whose vast keyboard output presents a nearly fully formed classical language, though the presence of his father looms large.

Geo Dude:

--- Quote from: Josquin des Prez on January 16, 2012, 04:56:09 PM ---Many of the earlier classical composers wrote extensively for the harpsichord, but their music still hark back to the baroque in many ways.

Some of those composers include Soler and Duphly, which used the language of Scarlatti and Rameau respectively mixed with many classical elements. Then we have Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, whose vast keyboard output presents a nearly fully formed classical language, though the presence of his father looms large.

--- End quote ---

I've been meaning to explore C.P.E. Bach.  Any harpsichord recordings you can recommend as being particularly strong?

Josquin des Prez:

--- Quote from: Geo Dude on January 16, 2012, 05:09:53 PM ---I've been meaning to explore C.P.E. Bach.  Any harpsichord recordings you can recommend as being particularly strong?

--- End quote ---

Saldy, i cannot. This is not one area i explored very deeply. The only point of interest that i can think of is that the complete edition of his keyboard works is recorded using a clavichord (to my chagrin). Since you are curious about the instrument this may be a good starting point as any:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YGAicBrQrEA

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