Author Topic: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)  (Read 18391 times)

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Offline Leo K.

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #20 on: February 01, 2012, 07:33:08 AM »
Stenhammer's string quartets are fine, and I'm still exploring them but recently got a set of his orchestral works (Jarvi on BIS)...glad this thread was started!

« Last Edit: February 01, 2012, 07:34:47 AM by Leo K »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #21 on: May 25, 2015, 07:12:51 AM »
Time to revive this thread after three years...

I'm really (and I do mean REALLY) impressed with his Symphony No. 2 in G minor. What a symphony! Perhaps one of the greatest Swedish symphonies I've heard. The lyricism and passion in the music are infectious. I believe I may have found my favorite Swede. :) Serenade is certainly another work which should make people's ears perk up. I remember listening to this work for the first-time around 2009 I believe and it was featured on an Andrew Davis Nordic compilation disc on the budget label Apex. This performance really made me want to explore more of Stenhammar's music. Unfortunately, many other musical interests had occurred since that time and it is only now that I'm getting back around to this composer.
« Last Edit: May 25, 2015, 07:14:42 AM by Mirror Image »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #22 on: May 25, 2015, 08:12:08 AM »
This is the greatest Stenhammar CD known to me; the performance of the Symphony is in a class of its own:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #23 on: May 25, 2015, 08:20:21 AM »
This is the greatest Stenhammar CD known to me; the performance of the Symphony is in a class of its own:



Yep, I ordered this CD earlier today. 8) I've heard nothing but great things about it.
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Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #24 on: May 25, 2015, 08:30:43 AM »
Time to revive this thread after three years...

I'm really (and I do mean REALLY) impressed with his Symphony No. 2 in G minor. What a symphony! Perhaps one of the greatest Swedish symphonies I've heard. The lyricism and passion in the music are infectious.

One of the first Naxoses I bought, back in 1997 or so, was their recording of the 2nd Symphony. I still have it and still love it. Very fine symphony indeed.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #25 on: May 25, 2015, 08:38:20 AM »
One of the first Naxoses I bought, back in 1997 or so, was their recording of the 2nd Symphony. I still have it and still love it. Very fine symphony indeed.

This must be the recording in question:



It's OOP which is quite odd for a Naxos release (not that it doesn't happen from time to time).
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #26 on: May 26, 2015, 08:20:32 AM »
Yep, I ordered this CD earlier today. 8) I've heard nothing but great things about it.
You won't regret this John - it is in a class of its own.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #27 on: May 26, 2015, 10:39:10 AM »
You won't regret this John - it is in a class of its own.

Good to hear, Jeffrey. I'm ready to hear another performance of this underrated symphony.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #28 on: May 26, 2015, 07:32:21 PM »


Curiosity got the better of me as I went to Spotify just to sample the first movement, Allegro Energico, of the above recording and I was absolutely captivated from start to finish. Yes, the broader approach that Westerberg employs certainly paid dividends to this movement. I didn't want to listen to the rest of the performance as I want to save it for whenever I actually receive the CD, but I absolutely loved what Westerberg has done so far with this magnificent symphony.
« Last Edit: May 26, 2015, 08:37:50 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #29 on: May 27, 2015, 12:38:57 AM »


Curiosity got the better of me as I went to Spotify just to sample the first movement, Allegro Energico, of the above recording and I was absolutely captivated from start to finish. Yes, the broader approach that Westerberg employs certainly paid dividends to this movement. I didn't want to listen to the rest of the performance as I want to save it for whenever I actually receive the CD, but I absolutely loved what Westerberg has done so far with this magnificent symphony.
Told you  8)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #30 on: May 27, 2015, 05:24:47 AM »
Told you  8)

Ah, but I had bought this recording before you suggested it to me, Jeffrey, but, yes, you did tell me it was great and you were certainly right. :)
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Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #31 on: May 27, 2015, 01:25:03 PM »
About the 2nd Symphony:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/8ey3wdhE1OI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/8ey3wdhE1OI</a>

I listened to this work for the first time and I liked it very much. Such a marvelous symphony, very powerful and lyrical; the musical texture is compelling, and the themes well weaved and developed; I loved the colourful contrast among sections, sometimes very intense, lively and energetic, sometimes deep, poetical and even dramatic, especially in the fourth movement, where I also enjoyed the use of pizzicato. The orchestration is beautiful and evocative, particularly the strings and the brass; there's a splendid Nordic atmosphere, not exactly as suggestive and depicting nature as I often perceive in composers like Sibelius, but gorgeous anyway; a Nordic atmosphere merged with a strong German Romantic influence.
I would like to listen to more from Stenhammar, which pieces could you suggest?
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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #32 on: May 27, 2015, 02:09:30 PM »
I would like to listen to more from Stenhammar, which pieces could you suggest?
Serenade in F major, Op. 31. You might also look into the late piano piece Late Summer, 5 piano pieces, Op. 33.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #33 on: May 27, 2015, 05:37:51 PM »
About the 2nd Symphony:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/8ey3wdhE1OI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/8ey3wdhE1OI</a>

I listened to this work for the first time and I liked it very much. Such a marvelous symphony, very powerful and lyrical; the musical texture is compelling, and the themes well weaved and developed; I loved the colourful contrast among sections, sometimes very intense, lively and energetic, sometimes deep, poetical and even dramatic, especially in the fourth movement, where I also enjoyed the use of pizzicato. The orchestration is beautiful and evocative, particularly the strings and the brass; there's a splendid Nordic atmosphere, not exactly as suggestive and depicting nature as I often perceive in composers like Sibelius, but gorgeous anyway; a Nordic atmosphere merged with a strong German Romantic influence.
I would like to listen to more from Stenhammar, which pieces could you suggest?

Wonderful to read, Ilaria! I agree with every word here. The seamless merging of Nordic and German influences is one thing that makes Stenhammar a unique musical voice. As for where to go next, I would suggest Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 23 and, as Karlo suggested, the Serenade in F major, Op. 31. You can't go wrong with either of these works. For the Piano Concerto No. 2, listen to Ortiz/Jarvi and as for the Serenade, check out Jarvi's performance, which is still the best of the three I've heard. Happy listening! 8)
"Close communion with the people is the natural soil nourishing all my work.” - Aram Khachaturian

Offline The new erato

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #34 on: May 28, 2015, 12:47:57 AM »
Ah, but I had bought this recording before you suggested it to me, Jeffrey, but, yes, you did tell me it was great and you were certainly right. :)
I bought this even before you (on LP in the late 70-ies)  :)

My favorite Stenhammar disc, and in superb, state of the art, sound. Need to rebuy it on CD I think.

Offline Lisztianwagner

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #35 on: May 28, 2015, 04:33:28 AM »
Serenade in F major, Op. 31. You might also look into the late piano piece Late Summer, 5 piano pieces, Op. 33.
Wonderful to read, Ilaria! I agree with every word here. The seamless merging of Nordic and German influences is one thing that makes Stenhammar a unique musical voice. As for where to go next, I would suggest Piano Concerto No. 2 in D minor, Op. 23 and, as Karlo suggested, the Serenade in F major, Op. 31. You can't go wrong with either of these works. For the Piano Concerto No. 2, listen to Ortiz/Jarvi and as for the Serenade, check out Jarvi's performance, which is still the best of the three I've heard. Happy listening! 8)
Thank you! What about the First Symphony? I read it was a composition strongly influenced by Bruckner, though later it was rejected by Stenhammat himself.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #36 on: May 28, 2015, 05:11:29 AM »
I bought this even before you (on LP in the late 70-ies)  :)

My favorite Stenhammar disc, and in superb, state of the art, sound. Need to rebuy it on CD I think.

Well sure, considering you're a: older than me and b: have been listening to classical a lot longer than I have, I would expect this from you at the very least, erato. ;) Yes, you should definitely pick up the Stenhammar Westerberg disc. I'm surprised you haven't bought the CD already.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #37 on: May 28, 2015, 05:14:12 AM »
Thank you! What about the First Symphony? I read it was a composition strongly influenced by Bruckner, though later it was rejected by Stenhammat himself.

Stenhammar's Symphony No. 1 is a good work, but not a great one. His 2nd is where his musical personality and own unique style reared it's head. Like Karlo and I suggested, you should head onto the Serenade next. I also think Piano Concerto No. 2 will be right up your alley. :)
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Offline The new erato

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #38 on: May 28, 2015, 05:18:35 AM »
Well sure, considering you're a: older than me and b: have been listening to classical a lot longer than I have, I would expect this from you at the very least, erato. ;) Yes, you should definitely pick up the Stenhammar Westerberg disc. I'm surprised you haven't bought the CD already.
Nice to see you young ones picking up!

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #39 on: May 28, 2015, 05:58:42 AM »
Nice to see you young ones picking up!

Well, I'd love to see younger people (even younger than me) get into classical music, but this isn't a fantasy world. :) Just imagine if I walked down the street and overheard two 16 year olds discussing the new Stenhammar recording? I would probably faint. ;D
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