Author Topic: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)  (Read 18796 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #80 on: May 28, 2019, 08:40:38 PM »
Westerberg’s recording is often considered definitive but I enjoyed Blomstedt’s just as much if not more, partly due to the marvelous BIS sonics.
Thanks Kyle. Might ask my daughter to get it for me as a b'day present.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #81 on: October 01, 2019, 03:59:22 PM »
Some days ago I re-listened to the 2nd Symphony on the Westerberg CD. Incredibly, that day I was less impressed by it, having praised that symphony over the years. In fact, I found the work rather underwhelming. The 1st movement was the one I felt stronger. I know, I'm a sinner.  ::) It could be another problem of overexposure. Or perhaps my tastes are changing. Not sure actually.

Having thought of that experience, today I tried another CD, this time with chamber music:



My surprise was superlative. All the works on the CD are really memorable, gracious, lyrical, in an unmistakable Romantic fashion and finely crafted:

Piano sonata in A flat major, Op. 12 (his last one for piano)
Violin sonata in A minor, Op. 19
Allegro ma non tanto for piano trio in A major
Allegro brillante for piano quartet in E flat major

I consider the Piano Sonata the crowning jewel on the CD. It's quite simply superb, tuneful, catchy, imbued with such elegance and spark. Possibly the work for piano trio is the most mainstream one, but even so it's worth listening.

I recommend the content of that CD with some enthusiasm for Romantic music lovers.

Offline André

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #82 on: October 01, 2019, 04:44:15 PM »
Stenhammar’s two symphonies have fine moments but also some longueurs. One could be forgiven for thinking they almost overstay their welcome.

The piano concertos, the string quartets and some of the piano works are very good. Best of all are the cantata The Song, the fine Serenad, the two gorgeous Sentimental Romances for violin, and some of the songs. These are my fave Stenhammar discs:



« Last Edit: October 01, 2019, 04:48:09 PM by André »

Offline Florestan

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #83 on: October 01, 2019, 11:21:01 PM »
Some days ago I re-listened to the 2nd Symphony on the Westerberg CD. Incredibly, that day I was less impressed by it, having praised that symphony over the years. In fact, I found the work rather underwhelming. The 1st movement was the one I felt stronger. I know, I'm a sinner.  ::) It could be another problem of overexposure. Or perhaps my tastes are changing. Not sure actually.

Having thought of that experience, today I tried another CD, this time with chamber music:



My surprise was superlative. All the works on the CD are really memorable, gracious, lyrical, in an unmistakable Romantic fashion and finely crafted:

Piano sonata in A flat major, Op. 12 (his last one for piano)
Violin sonata in A minor, Op. 19
Allegro ma non tanto for piano trio in A major
Allegro brillante for piano quartet in E flat major

I consider the Piano Sonata the crowning jewel on the CD. It's quite simply superb, tuneful, catchy, imbued with such elegance and spark. Possibly the work for piano trio is the most mainstream one, but even so it's worth listening.

I recommend the content of that CD with some enthusiasm for Romantic music lovers.

Thw whole cycle is very worthwile.

Try also his SQs.



"Melody is the essence of music." --- Mozart

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #84 on: October 02, 2019, 10:12:55 AM »
Thw whole cycle is very worthwile.

Try also his SQs.

Oh yes! The SQs represent the meat of his chamber music. The No. 3 is the one that comes to my mind immediately with its rustic flavour.

Offline kyjo

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #85 on: October 18, 2019, 08:55:35 AM »
Some days ago I re-listened to the 2nd Symphony on the Westerberg CD. Incredibly, that day I was less impressed by it, having praised that symphony over the years. In fact, I found the work rather underwhelming. The 1st movement was the one I felt stronger. I know, I'm a sinner.  ::) It could be another problem of overexposure. Or perhaps my tastes are changing. Not sure actually.

Overexposed to Stenhammar? Impossible! ;) I almost agree with you about the 2nd Symphony; I think it's a fine work with some great moments (the delightful scherzo and the imposing ending), but in the end it's not exactly emotionally stirring or cathartic; perhaps a bit too restrained to make a bigger impact. I've seen it described several times as "the greatest Swedish symphony" but I enjoy most of Atterberg's, Alfven's 3rd, and Peterson-Berger's 3rd more than it. The Westerberg recording is usually referred to as definitive, but I really enjoyed Blomstedt's recent recording on BIS, which, unsurprisingly, has superb sonics.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

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Re: Wilhelm Stenhammar (1871-1927)
« Reply #86 on: October 18, 2019, 11:05:22 AM »
Overexposed to Stenhammar? Impossible! ;) I almost agree with you about the 2nd Symphony; I think it's a fine work with some great moments (the delightful scherzo and the imposing ending), but in the end it's not exactly emotionally stirring or cathartic; perhaps a bit too restrained to make a bigger impact. I've seen it described several times as "the greatest Swedish symphony" but I enjoy most of Atterberg's, Alfven's 3rd, and Peterson-Berger's 3rd more than it. The Westerberg recording is usually referred to as definitive, but I really enjoyed Blomstedt's recent recording on BIS, which, unsurprisingly, has superb sonics.

Have you ever heard the fragment of his 3rd Symphony on Chandos? It sounds like it would have been a much more interesting symphony.