Author Topic: Recordings That You Are Considering  (Read 2593532 times)

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Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Recordings That You Are Considering
« Reply #16620 on: September 08, 2022, 04:28:19 PM »
That is easy as they are very different so you can decide based on your own preference. The Muti cycle features broader tempos - not slow, but not fast, either - while Markevitch is hungry, driven, very Russian. Both orchestras are spectacular. As befits the conducting styles, the recording styles are different too - Markevitch more "hot," the Muti/EMI sound (as I am remembering it, it has been a few years) more spacious, diffuse, concert hall-like.

Personally I think Markevitch's Fourth is one of the most amazing recordings of anything ever and in general prefer his more exciting approach. But if you like a performance that luxuriates a little more ("relaxes" is not the right word, Muti is still emotional), that has a little more operatic passion rather than Russian drive, then you will be happy with Muti.

Hey, you're not making this any easier—from those descriptions they both sound fantastic. The only solution is both  ;D But I think for now (after sampling a bit of each earlier today) Markevitch/LSO will probably be first up.

Offline Jo498

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Re: Recordings That You Are Considering
« Reply #16621 on: September 08, 2022, 11:50:58 PM »
We discussed Markevitch and other Tchaikovsky recordings a few weeks ago in a thread on the composer or his symphonies, see, if you can find these remarks. I think the sound is slightly better on Muti, both are brilliant, often very fast and I disagree that Markevitch is especially "Russian".
The orchestra obviously isn't, so the sound is very different from Soviet era Russian orchestras and Markevitch came to France as a toddler, later he lived mostly in Italy, he was Russian/Ukrainian only by birth.

Roughly, both are much closer in approach to Toscanini (driven, but straightforward) than to Golovanov (unabashedly subjective/romantic), or even the more famous later Soviet era conductors like Mravinsky or Rozhdestvensky.

If you care about "Manfred", look around for different boxes/packages because both Muti and Markevitch recorded that one as well but it is not included in all issues.
« Last Edit: September 09, 2022, 12:46:39 AM by Jo498 »
Struck by the sounds before the sun,
I knew the night had gone.
The morning breeze like a bugle blew
Against the drums of dawn.
(Bob Dylan)

Offline vers la flamme

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Re: Recordings That You Are Considering
« Reply #16622 on: September 16, 2022, 01:43:06 AM »