Author Topic: 21st century classical music  (Read 234207 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1380 on: April 19, 2021, 08:25:33 AM »
For a more laid back approach to exploring timbre, and more my cup of tea in fact, there's this

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/xBQx6q2ll-4&amp;ab_channel=Anothertimbre" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/xBQx6q2ll-4&amp;ab_channel=Anothertimbre</a>

Eleane Radigue has been exploring timbre in the Occam series, most recently for a whole orchestra, worth catching at least.

Alvin Lucier is still active, and of course is exploring shifting timbres in some large scale music, for example Diamonds, which according to this youtube was 2001.  I like it very much.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/yVm_0Iw44dg&amp;ab_channel=SylvainMoore" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/yVm_0Iw44dg&amp;ab_channel=SylvainMoore</a>

And I wonder if more recent music by Jurg Frey is of interest, much less conceptual than before I think -- I love this piece which I think is by Frey and Magnus Granberg together.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ds12MTQnflU&amp;ab_channel=Anothertimbre" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ds12MTQnflU&amp;ab_channel=Anothertimbre</a>

At the end of the day it's obviously a matter of temperament, but I get a lot of pleasure out of this sort of immersive music.

« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 08:38:40 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1381 on: April 19, 2021, 02:05:12 PM »
Very nice.

I would also add a few others into the mix:

Andy Akiho (this is the video I use to introduce extended technique)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oozStoaH_mo (her entire channel is a goldmine)

Mark Andre
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZjRi3nuW9iM

Liza Lim
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dyckASauJHY
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wbBtjI1UPbc

Lectures on her compositional praxis:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yl6ausOgrUM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=I4f9Q1ePH80
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rL_GkjINniU

Yui Sakagoshi (performer)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cOHYioq-SR0

Sonja Mutic
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Z2-r31EQWW4 (this is the best channel for 21st century classical music alongside its counterpart: Score Follower)

Matthias Kranebitter
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GftvcKghhow (this is next best channel for 21st century classical music alongside its counterpart: grinblat)

Interesting list, with some names new to me, thanks. Glad to see Andy Akiho mentioned, who has done some really fine work with steel pans. And I've liked what I've heard from Liza Lim and Mark Andre.

--Bruce
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Offline Cato

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1382 on: April 19, 2021, 04:06:27 PM »
Always glad to be of assistance. :-)

Francesca Verunelli (might be my favorite living composer, very interesting and intriguing soundscapes)
https://www.francescaverunelli.com/bio/

Tune and Retune (2017/18)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wji0bZTLs3w

wo/man sitting at the piano (2017/19)
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EvB-e0y0T2o

Philoctetes!!!

You came back!!!  How wonderful!  And many thanks for the links!
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1383 on: April 19, 2021, 07:21:37 PM »
All wonderful selections, but I really wanted to highlight the importance of the above. My tendency to music tends to be what some might label as "extreme," but the swath of 21st century classical music is enormous and pretty much all-encompassing. I would be stunned if you did not find something you like from those channels I highlighted above, and, for me, when I compare the 21st century to the music that came before, I find very little reason to go back.

I’ve been listening to quite a bit of Mark Andre’s piano music over the past few months, spacious sometimes, and melancholy too. It’s hard for me to get a feel for what’s going on now in music, apart from the big names who have serious record contracts and get commissions from important ensembles and orchestras. I bet the most exciting experimental stuff is happening with friends making music over zoom, putting it on Vimeo. Low tech, small scale.

Have you explored Martin Arnold? I’d say he’s the most challenging of the new composers I’ve heard.
« Last Edit: April 19, 2021, 07:23:41 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Cato

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1384 on: April 20, 2021, 12:03:20 PM »
Wojtek Blecharz (sidenote: maybe the best looking composer today)
https://wojtekblecharz.com/
https://www.youtube.com/user/wojtel/videos

Black Square: Sonata for Keyboard and Tape:
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pRGiISiRptw

This is a performance that can be listened to, but as with many of his pieces - it should be watched. Hints of droning, and if you've ever seen the endings of Ari Aster's films, you will also find some similarities there - it is very haunting, almost primal - an almost demonic uplift. Simply lovely.

Many thanks!

Allow me to offer for your consideration:


Lera Auerbach

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/ngY4Bc3hTKw" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/ngY4Bc3hTKw</a>


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/XwWTWgxQDyI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/XwWTWgxQDyI</a>
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Offline Mandryka

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1385 on: April 22, 2021, 12:38:08 PM »
Started to explore this

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/fX-LjwBkl24" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/fX-LjwBkl24</a>
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Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1386 on: April 23, 2021, 03:19:34 AM »
A fantastic little piece...1 AM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=--IC1ECix3A

It is great, and gorgeous. Thanks for posting this.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
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Offline Old San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1387 on: April 23, 2021, 12:31:25 PM »
Alexandra du Bois — String Quartet: Oculus pro oculo totum orbem terrae caecat (2003)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/deBSKxjP8ZE" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/deBSKxjP8ZE</a>

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1388 on: April 24, 2021, 06:04:44 AM »
Richard Barrett — "Politeia" from Construction

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/o3etaMP9x9Y" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/o3etaMP9x9Y</a>

Politeia is a component of Richard Barrett's massive work, Construction, which is the is the eighth and final composition of his series entitled 'resistance & vision'
http://richardbarrettmusic.com/

Performed by Elision Ensemble
Genevieve Lacey (recorder ), Carl Rosman (tenor saxophone), Richard Haynes (baritone saxophone), Timothy O'Dwyer (bass saxophone), Dafne Vincente-Sandoval (bassoon), Tristram Williams (flugelhorn), Benjamin Marks (trombone), Marshall McGuire (baroque double harp), Daryl Buckley (electric guitar), Domenico Melchiorre (percussion), Graeme Jennings (violin), Erkki Veltheim (viola), Séverine Ballon (cello), ELISION Ensemble conducted by Eugene Ughetti
Daryl Buckley (artistic director)
http://www.elision.org.au/

This work is divided into two ensembles: a quintet & an octet (designated by different 'fonts'). These ensembles are often juxtaposed while playing starkly disparate textures and meters. The contrast is so substantial that the two ensembles cannot be represented in a vertical format in a traditional score; indeed, Barrett wrote them out sequentially, providing instructions for when the ensembles should play simultaneously. I hope that this Score Follower helps to demonstrate the 'counterpoint of forces' in a somewhat linear fashion.

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1389 on: April 24, 2021, 09:05:27 AM »
Unsuk Chin - Sheng Concerto "Šu" (2009)

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/jWJwgdJh0eI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/jWJwgdJh0eI</a>

Composer: Unsuk Chin (진은숙 Chin Unsuk) (July 14, 1961 –)
Sheng: Wei Wu
Orchestra: Seoul Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Myung-Whun Chung

Chin demonstrates her absolutely masterful control of timbre in this piece, particularly in the way instrumental colors blend in and out with each other. Take, for example, how the muted violins in artificial harmonics sneak out of the sound of the solo sheng at 1:05​, or how the clarinets come out of the sound of muted trombone and then move in and out of each others' sounds bringing out various shades of their tight quarter-tone harmony at 4:55​.

The piece begins small, with only the solo sheng in slow meditative rhythm. Over the course of the piece, the intensity of rhythm and orchestration gradually builds up. This culminates in a highly rhythmic climax section at 13:25​ before returning to the calm of the introduction at 18:20​, now laid upon an incredibly eerie soundscape formed by percussion and strings.

Offline relm1

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1390 on: April 24, 2021, 03:09:57 PM »
I am enjoying exploring this composer.  What do you think?

Simon Steen-Andersen - Piano Concerto
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5Zt6vgvSMo

Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1391 on: April 24, 2021, 03:20:00 PM »
I am enjoying exploring this composer.  What do you think?

Simon Steen-Andersen - Piano Concerto
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i5Zt6vgvSMo

Just recently I saw a livestream of this piece (also with Nicolas Hodges as soloist) and thought it was incredible. Certainly audacious, if nothing else: The soloist plays live, along with a videotaped version of himself playing a piano that has been dropped to the stage -- frame crushed, strings pulled out of tune. The technical demands alone are noteworthy, but I found the results quite interesting.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1392 on: April 24, 2021, 03:55:59 PM »
Unfortunately, the livestream I saw was apparently not archived. Here is another performance on YouTube -- alas, audio only -- but also with Nicolas Hodges. This performance has a still photograph from the opening that tells a bit of the story. It's true: To fully experience the piece, it should be seen as well as heard. I do like the music, but the visuals carry an enormous impact.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LUH29h5A0LY&t=634s

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1393 on: April 24, 2021, 04:03:11 PM »
Never mind, I found it, and it's still available! Was in February, part of a great festival from Musica nova Helsinki, as the climax of an excellent program with Varése and Anna Meredith. Actually so happy to know this is still available to watch, because it's so unusual.

https://areena.yle.fi/1-50742769

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline relm1

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1394 on: April 25, 2021, 05:15:27 AM »
Never mind, I found it, and it's still available! Was in February, part of a great festival from Musica nova Helsinki, as the climax of an excellent program with Varése and Anna Meredith. Actually so happy to know this is still available to watch, because it's so unusual.

https://areena.yle.fi/1-50742769

--Bruce

This is a perfect example of 21st century music because the music uses acoustic methods but interpretative demands 21st century techniques like video and such.  the other work I saw of this composer was a chamber work where he improvised in real time a part that was projected to the written parts the strings were playing so the that realtime use of media seems to be a very contemporary capability of music. 

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1395 on: April 25, 2021, 05:32:43 AM »
Christopher CerroneMemory Palace (2012)
performed by Ian Rosenbaum

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4</a>

Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1396 on: April 25, 2021, 06:04:20 AM »
This is a perfect example of 21st century music because the music uses acoustic methods but interpretative demands 21st century techniques like video and such.  the other work I saw of this composer was a chamber work where he improvised in real time a part that was projected to the written parts the strings were playing so the that realtime use of media seems to be a very contemporary capability of music.

True. (That's why I was a little reluctant to suggest the audio-only version of the concerto, since it really has to be seen as well as heard.) And many composers today are inspired by video and other technologies, which can be incorporated into their vision. I don't see it as a bad thing.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Brewski

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1397 on: April 25, 2021, 06:04:46 AM »
Christopher CerroneMemory Palace (2012)
performed by Ian Rosenbaum

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4</a>

Love Cerrone's work in general. Thanks for posting.

--Bruce
"Do you realize that we're meteorites; almost as soon as we're born, we have to disappear?"

~Iannis Xenakis

Twitter: @BruceHodgesNY

Offline Iota

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1398 on: April 25, 2021, 12:54:15 PM »
Christopher CerroneMemory Palace (2012)
performed by Ian Rosenbaum

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/2awb4GLJ7N4</a>

What magical/intense pieces those are. I'd never heard of Christopher Cerrone before, thanks for posting.

Offline Old San Antone

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Re: 21st century classical music
« Reply #1399 on: May 04, 2021, 11:16:38 PM »
Aaron Cassidy: Second String Quartet

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Pd6B5zLaHiU

The JACK Quartet performs the West Coast premiere of Aaron Cassidy's Second String Quartet for the Monday Evening Concerts series on February 14, 2011 at Zipper Concert Hall at the Colburn School.