Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 9984535 times)

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Offline Traverso

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142420 on: September 22, 2019, 09:55:51 AM »
Bach

Triple Concerto BWV 1044

First time I listened to this work was from this LP.It is such a fine piece,the  introvert melancholy of the Traverso......:angel:








Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142421 on: September 22, 2019, 09:56:46 AM »
It’s a marvelous work indeed, Dvorak proudly hitting his stride. One of the only two symphonies by Dvorak I’ve heard in concert (the other being no 7).

Interesting, because now that I think of it, I have not yet heard any Dvorak live in concert.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline Ken B

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142422 on: September 22, 2019, 10:44:25 AM »
Schumann
Various stuff for piano
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Offline ChopinBroccoli

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142423 on: September 22, 2019, 11:18:47 AM »


This cycle has long been a cult favorite among collectors ... I haven't listened to the whole thing but rather checked out a few of my Ravel favorites. 

This is some of the more unique Ravel solo piano you'll ever hear... Simon makes liberal but very compelling use of the pedals and he seldom plays with the very delicate pianissimo typically used in this music.  This is a risky strategy but his obvious mastery of the pedals and his emphasis on a rhythmic incisiveness generally alien to performance of these pieces makes it work and proves highly persuasive.  It may not be true to an established tradition but it's a well-argued deviation.  Simon's tone is bold and sparkling with a spiky upper register that reminds me of Gary Graffman. 

Ultimately too eccentric to serve as a Ravel reference, I'd still rate this highly as an alternative view and to anyone that likes to hear great piano playing.
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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142424 on: September 22, 2019, 11:24:44 AM »
Nielsen
Symphonies # 4 & 6
Gothenburg Symphony
Järvi
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142425 on: September 22, 2019, 11:26:56 AM »


Not advertised on the cover is the inclusion of the lovely Serenade for strings, separating the two main items on offer. A very nice, intelligent programmatic touch.

Nice!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline aligreto

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142426 on: September 22, 2019, 11:48:17 AM »
Beethoven: Archduke Trio [Oistrakh/Oborin/Knushevitsky]





The Archduke Trio is a particular favourite of mine, particularly the first movement, and this is a very fine, robust, energetic and exhilarating performance.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline listener

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142427 on: September 22, 2019, 11:52:35 AM »
MOZART:  Piano Concertos 17 &  23
Richard Goode, piano     Orpheus Chamber Orch.,      nice!
Katherine HOOVER: Da Pacem  (Quintet for Piano and String Quartet)
Halsey STEVENS: Quintet for flute, piano, violin, viola and cello
LOEFFLER:  Music for Four Stringed Instruments for string quartet
Monteclaire String Quartet with Leslie Pettys, piano and  Wendell Dobbs, flute
Vincent d’INDY:  Wallenstein op. 12     Sérénade et Valse op. 25
Prelude to Act II of Fervaal op. 40   Lied op. 19 for cello and orch.
Suite dans le style ancient in D, op. 24
Rumon Gamba, cond.       Iceland S.O.    first listen to a new arrival
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Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142428 on: September 22, 2019, 01:12:49 PM »
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Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142429 on: September 22, 2019, 01:50:31 PM »


Last disc in the set, containing sonatas 10, 13 and 31. Frank’s Beethoven is forthright, direct, uncompromising without lapsing into belligerence. Only the last ounce of fantasy is missing, but that may very well be an interpretive choice. All told, an engrossing Beethoven experience.

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142430 on: September 22, 2019, 02:20:06 PM »
Now listening to a 24/96 FLAC version--way better than the Qobuz stream, which sounded pretty good. The playing is phenomenal.


Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142431 on: September 22, 2019, 03:11:30 PM »


Recorded in 1985 and issued by Koch Schwann, later licensed to DGG. This is the orchestral arrangement by Fritz Stiedry (1883-1969), a protégé of Gustav Mahler. Participated in the premieres of Schonberg’s Die Glückliche Hand. Director of the Berlin Opera, emigrated to the USSR in 1933, where he premiered Shostakovich’s first piano concerto with the composer as soloist. Emigrated to the US, where his career at the Lyric Opera and the Met lasted from 1940 to 1958. The orchestra is treated very transparently, indeed the results are luminous. 6 of the 20 canons are played by a keyboard duo. I haven’t been able to find if this was part of Stiedry’s original concept or if it was that of the conductor Hans Zender, a conductor usually heard in modern music (Rihm, Dallapiccola, Webern, Feldman and his own compositions).

I found the result very satisfying. I am usually bored before the halfway mark in this work, but not here.

Offline SymphonicAddict

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142432 on: September 22, 2019, 05:24:16 PM »


Liszt's Piano Sonata in B minor orchestrated by L. Weiner: This orchestration enhances the epic scope of this sonata, almost turning it into a tone poem. The result is more than convincing. I liked it quite much.




Suite No. 2 from Spalicek: This magnificent suite is a spicy appetizer for the entire ballet. I can't be wrong when claiming that Martinu is a true master on his art. This work is supremely fun, sparkling, vivid, magical. Once again Martinu leaves me astounded.




Gran Torso: I'm afraid this is too avant-garde for my taste. The music is too scattered, but there are some effects that struck me like interesting. My perception is that the composer was trying to draw something by using notes on stringed instruments.

Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142433 on: September 22, 2019, 05:38:53 PM »


Recorded in 1985 and issued by Koch Schwann, later licensed to DGG. This is the orchestral arrangement by Fritz Stiedry (1883-1969), a protégé of Gustav Mahler. Participated in the premieres of Schonberg’s Die Glückliche Hand. Director of the Berlin Opera, emigrated to the USSR in 1933, where he premiered Shostakovich’s first piano concerto with the composer as soloist. Emigrated to the US, where his career at the Lyric Opera and the Met lasted from 1940 to 1958. The orchestra is treated very transparently, indeed the results are luminous. 6 of the 20 canons are played by a keyboard duo. I haven’t been able to find if this was part of Stiedry’s original concept or if it was that of the conductor Hans Zender, a conductor usually heard in modern music (Rihm, Dallapiccola, Webern, Feldman and his own compositions).

I found the result very satisfying. I am usually bored before the halfway mark in this work, but not here.
I checked it out on YouTube an just bought a copy of Ebay--thanks for posting--I wan't aware of it.

Offline JBS

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142434 on: September 22, 2019, 06:08:45 PM »


Recorded in 1985 and issued by Koch Schwann, later licensed to DGG. This is the orchestral arrangement by Fritz Stiedry (1883-1969), a protégé of Gustav Mahler. Participated in the premieres of Schonberg’s Die Glückliche Hand. Director of the Berlin Opera, emigrated to the USSR in 1933, where he premiered Shostakovich’s first piano concerto with the composer as soloist. Emigrated to the US, where his career at the Lyric Opera and the Met lasted from 1940 to 1958. The orchestra is treated very transparently, indeed the results are luminous. 6 of the 20 canons are played by a keyboard duo. I haven’t been able to find if this was part of Stiedry’s original concept or if it was that of the conductor Hans Zender, a conductor usually heard in modern music (Rihm, Dallapiccola, Webern, Feldman and his own compositions).

I found the result very satisfying. I am usually bored before the halfway mark in this work, but not here.

Bah! Amazon refuses to show anything other the original Koch Schwann issues. Do either of you have a listing for this DG issue? I am not keen on paying approximately $20 for a used CD sight unseen...

TD
Schubert
Symphonies 2 and 4

Colin Davis/Staatskapelle Dresden

Brahms
Sonatas 1 and 2 for 'Cello and Piano

Leonard Rose 'cello/Leonid Hambro piano

Elizabethan Consort Songs
Rose Consort of Viols/ Catherine King mezzosoprano


Online Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142435 on: September 22, 2019, 06:36:53 PM »
Most of my recent purchases have landed, including this.

So getting started with Sonata No.4, op.7



EDIT: Followed by the Pathetique op.13

SECOND EDIT: The opening movement of the Pathetique sounds thoroughly like it's come from a Mozart opera. Superb.
« Last Edit: September 22, 2019, 07:08:17 PM by Madiel »
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Online Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142436 on: September 22, 2019, 07:33:28 PM »
As most of my new Shostakovich has arrived...

Scherzo in F sharp minor, op.1

I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142437 on: September 22, 2019, 11:12:15 PM »
Bah! Amazon refuses to show anything other the original Koch Schwann issues. Do either of you have a listing for this DG issue? I am not keen on paying approximately $20 for a used CD sight unseen...

According to the booklet of the DG release all the arrangements are made by Fritz Stiedry, not Hans Zender.

The contrapuncti are played in the sequence of the original printed score, except that the canons are interspersed between the contrapuncti and played by the two pianists, who also play the three-part mirror fugue. All the other contrapuncti, the four-part mirror fugue and the unfinished fugue are played by the symphony orchestra.

If you consider the AoF a symphonic work - and as such it is well played - , this may well be for you, but it is not my cup of tea.
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Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142438 on: September 22, 2019, 11:26:44 PM »
CD VIII.

Partitas from Secondary Sources (III)


My admiration for Stella's interpretation grows with each hearing. Plus the fact that he is using beautiful instruments, and is given a fine recording.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #142439 on: September 22, 2019, 11:52:57 PM »


Recorded in 1985 and issued by Koch Schwann, later licensed to DGG. This is the orchestral arrangement by Fritz Stiedry (1883-1969), a protégé of Gustav Mahler. Participated in the premieres of Schonberg’s Die Glückliche Hand. Director of the Berlin Opera, emigrated to the USSR in 1933, where he premiered Shostakovich’s first piano concerto with the composer as soloist. Emigrated to the US, where his career at the Lyric Opera and the Met lasted from 1940 to 1958. The orchestra is treated very transparently, indeed the results are luminous. 6 of the 20 canons are played by a keyboard duo. I haven’t been able to find if this was part of Stiedry’s original concept or if it was that of the conductor Hans Zender, a conductor usually heard in modern music (Rihm, Dallapiccola, Webern, Feldman and his own compositions).

I found the result very satisfying. I am usually bored before the halfway mark in this work, but not here.

When I heard it I was a bit disappointed because, given Zender's reputation for new music, I was hoping for something more adventurous in the orchestration. Where's the Klangfarbenmelodie? The piano pieces are nicely done though.



« Last Edit: September 22, 2019, 11:57:06 PM by Mandryka »
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