Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 14334422 times)

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Offline "Harry"

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102040 on: November 15, 2017, 03:48:47 AM »
There comes a point in your life when you realize: Who matters, Who never did, Who won't anymore, And who always will. So, don't worry about people from your past, there's a reason why they didn't make it to your future.

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102041 on: November 15, 2017, 03:55:01 AM »
John Zorn - The Holy Visions (for five female voices)



Offline San Antone

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102042 on: November 15, 2017, 05:17:02 AM »


First listen - Ravel is sounding nice.

Offline Madiel

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102043 on: November 15, 2017, 05:19:09 AM »
Bridge, Suite for Strings


Around 1909-10, Bridge's work is still often on the 'light' side but getting more sophisticated nevertheless.
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Offline San Antone

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102044 on: November 15, 2017, 05:49:15 AM »


First listen - Ravel is sounding nice.

The Ravel concerto was played in a straight-forward manner, but well.  In the Prokofiev, however, there is a Keith Jarrett-esque cadenza.  My mistake, I confused the first Schlime Improvisation with the end of the Prokofiev. 
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 05:53:04 AM by San Antonio »

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102045 on: November 15, 2017, 05:59:00 AM »
I'll yet have to figure out what I'm missing from the two new boxes, bought a pile of the individual discs last year and from the bits of it I've explored so far (plus hearing "Les Bandar-Log" at Lucerne Festival this summer, with Holliger as well) and now the Zinman "Jungle Book", I'm really enjoying it!

Great to hear!
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Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102046 on: November 15, 2017, 06:26:10 AM »
Disclaimer: l am not familiar with the recording linked below, so l cannot offer it with any sort of personal recommendation.

Having said that, l would note that even past his prime, DF-D at times had considerably more to offer than other baritones of his day. So, this might be worth consideration:

http://www.arkivmusic.com/classical/album.jsp?album_id=37947

Regards,

LKB

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Parsifal

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102047 on: November 15, 2017, 06:41:43 AM »
The cure for symphonic overload:



Martinu Piano Trio No 1, Duet for violin and cello. The Piano Trio was particularly engaging, a five movement suite in what strikes me as a neo-baroque style.
« Last Edit: November 15, 2017, 06:44:02 AM by Scarpia »

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102048 on: November 15, 2017, 06:43:27 AM »
The cure for symphonic overload:

Another cure:

Wuorinen
Fast Fantasy (1977)
Fred Sherry, vc
the composer, pf
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
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Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102049 on: November 15, 2017, 06:44:29 AM »



The Borodin's Ninth.  Rather like the Beethoven's take, the Borodin play the music in simultaneously light but tense or nervous fashion, as they do in the first Adagio, which also sounds more morose to start before sort of relaxing a bit.  The Allegretto is quick and biting, with the William Tell music sounding musically sarcastic, and the Borodin bring both intensity and mordant wit to the latter portions of the movement.  The second Adagio is your run of the mill grim DSCH, done about as well it can be done.  The Allegro goes for the bright, edgy, intense opening, though the playing isn't spectacularly fast.  It sort of grinds the listener down, with the "khokhochu" music a sort of relentless idea shoved at the listener again and again.  And that's the easygoing part of the movement.  After about 3'30"-ish, the Borodin play with even more bite and intensity, which lasts all the way until the pause before the pizzacato section, which itself manages to sound more aggressive than normal.  They then start the crescendo slowly and quietly, but they build up to one of the more feverish codas.  If only it were in better sound.
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Offline North Star

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102050 on: November 15, 2017, 06:50:23 AM »
Mompou
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Perianes

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Offline Brian

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102051 on: November 15, 2017, 07:33:34 AM »
Things are getting awfully windy around here.


Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102052 on: November 15, 2017, 07:34:42 AM »
Violin Sonata in F major, Op. 57 from this set:

"Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art." - Claude Debussy

Offline North Star

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102053 on: November 15, 2017, 07:42:25 AM »
Bach
Magnificat
Maria Keohane (S), Anna Zander (S), Carlos Mena (A), Hans-Jörg Mammel (T), Stephan MacLeod (B)
Francis Jacob (organ)
Ricercar Consort
Philippe Pierlot

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Offline ritter

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102054 on: November 15, 2017, 07:52:22 AM »
Some Reynaldo Hahn today. Portraits de peintres, for speaker and piano, on texts by Marcel Proust.


I knew the work in recordings sans voix, but it makes much more sense as originally conceived (as a mélodrame, that is). I am not particularly keen on how Mme. Gautier declaims the text, as she is simultaneously too vehement and does not enunciate it all that clearly, but the superimposition of spoken text on the piano line is most agreeable. Both authors (who were starting an intimate liaison at the time) were very young men in  1894, the year of the piece's composition (Proust 23 and Hahn 20 years old).

Just as Proust's text--short prose poems "portraying" Albert Cuyp, Paulus Potter, Anton Van Dyck and Antoine Watteau--does not really presage the greatness of things to come, Reynaldo's music already shows a full command of his capabilities. Actually, it's fair to say that Hahn the composer was better known than Proust the author at the time.

The first piece is the most engaging IMHO, with some very seductive modulations, and well-thought  changes in the piano line. It's also nice to hear in the last piece ("Watteau") a phrase that Reynaldo had already used in his setting of Paul Verlaine's Mandoline a year earlier (in his song Fêtes galantes); this is quite fitting, as Verlaine's poem is a Watteau-esque as it gets.   8)

Perfect stuff for Florestan, methinks.  :)
« Last Edit: January 24, 2019, 11:00:10 AM by ritter »
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Offline Florestan

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102055 on: November 15, 2017, 07:56:34 AM »
Some Reynaldo Hahn today. Portraits de peintres, for speaker and piano, on texts by Marcel Proust.


I knew the work in recordings san voix, but it makes much more sense as originally conceived (as a mélodrame, that is). I am not particularly keen on how Mme. Gautier declaims the text, as she is simultaneously too vehement and does not enunciate it all that clearly, but the superimposition of spoken text on the piano line is most agreeable. Both authors (who were starting an intimate liaison at the time) were very young men in  1894, the year of the piece's composition (Proust 23 and Hahn 20 years old).

Just as Proust's text--short prose poems "portraiting" Albert Cuyp, Paulus Potter, Anton Van Dyck and Antoine Watteau--does not really presage the greatness of things to come, Reynaldo's music already shows a full command of his capabilities. Actually, it's fair to say that Hahn the composer was better known than Proust the author at the time.

The first piece is the most engaging IMHO, with some very seductive modulations, and well-thought  changes in the piano line. It's also nice to hear in the last piece ("Watteau") a phrase that Reynaldo had already used in his setting of Paul Verlaine's Mandoline a year earlier (in his song Fêtes galantes); this is quite fitting, as Verlaine's poem is a Watteau-esque as it gets.   8)

Perfect stuff for Florestan, methinks.  :)

You bet. Thanks.
"Music expresses that which cannot be said and on which it is impossible to be silent." - Victor Hugo

Offline king ubu

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102056 on: November 15, 2017, 08:03:14 AM »


Second spin in a row (with a break though) - brilliant, methinks!
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cilgwyn

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102057 on: November 15, 2017, 08:24:38 AM »
On first impressions,this German recording should be not worth bothering about,when you can get it in the original French. But this is actually a very lively recording,with a nice feel for the genre. The singing is all of the high standard you might expect from emi electrola,at that time. Also,you get Anneliese Rothenberger as Eurydice. A little 'matronly' sounding,by that time;but I'm a bit of a fan,so I'm happy. One of the main reasons I bought the recording was just the pleasure of listening to her singing this role. I just love her voice! I also like the way the characters bring in brief quotations from late 19th & early,20th c,Viennese operettas. Fun! :) Not a first choice;but,imho,well worth adding to your collection.........particularly if you're an Anneliese Rothenberger fan! Also,let's not forget that Offenbach was born in Germany,and was pretty much responsible for the operetta craze that followed (Although,Hervé,actually,got there first!). This recording uses the original German score,without any of the 1874 additions. Nice! :)


Offline Que

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102058 on: November 15, 2017, 09:11:39 AM »
.


Q

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102059 on: November 15, 2017, 09:15:08 AM »
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

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