Author Topic: What are you listening to now?  (Read 13557065 times)

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Offline San Antone

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102700 on: November 22, 2017, 03:33:59 PM »


Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102701 on: November 22, 2017, 04:12:11 PM »
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102702 on: November 22, 2017, 05:42:41 PM »


Disc 4/4.

This set has music from 10 movies, all performed superbly by Frank Strobel and the RSO, Berlin. Schnittke is more successful than Shostakovich in creating genuinely original, intriguing, captivating numbers. Although I love Dsch’s film music, and own half a dozen discs of it, I find Schnittke’ genius more at home in the particular language of film music.

I certainly won’t argue with you here. I find Schnittke really came into his own in film music. Obviously, I love a lot of his more serious concert music, but his inventiveness in this medium was quite individual.

Do you own this recording?



If you don’t own it, then please remedy this soon. Schnittke's last film work, The Master and Margarita, is a real hoot. There’s a demented take on Ravel’s Bolero that is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.
“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102703 on: November 22, 2017, 05:47:03 PM »
Now:

e Raid merveilleux (The Amazing Flight), a mechanical ballet, H. 159
La Revue de cuisine (The Kitchen Revue), jazz-ballet in 1 act, H. 161
On Tourne!, ballet in 1 act, H. 163


Christopher Hogwood, conductor
Czech Philharmonic Orchestra




An absolute delight from start to finish.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 05:56:15 PM by Mirror Image »
“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

Kontrapunctus

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102704 on: November 22, 2017, 05:55:02 PM »
I finished listening to this today. While I normally prefer larger ensembles playing on modern instruments, this performance sounds great, and their energetic playing adds to the enjoyment. The smaller ensemble provides excellent clarity of the parts, too.


Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102705 on: November 22, 2017, 06:06:15 PM »
The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102706 on: November 22, 2017, 06:44:58 PM »
Act II:

“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102707 on: November 22, 2017, 06:46:28 PM »
Vaughan Williams Symphony No.8 D minor, Previn conducting the LSO




Sarge

I plan on revisiting this symphony at some point tonight. Such an enchanting work.
“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

kishnevi

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102708 on: November 22, 2017, 07:22:55 PM »


DSCH 1or 2? And  is the DSCH worth getting? (My interest in the Tchaikovsky is much weaker.)
ETA found it on Amazon. But still want your opinion.
TD


Last two CDs of this set.
Florestan's high regard for this set is justified. Although it's probably better to dip into the set a bit at a time, not wholesale like I am doing now.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 07:27:29 PM by Jeffrey Smith »

Offline Todd

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102709 on: November 22, 2017, 07:50:01 PM »
DSCH 1or 2? And  is the DSCH worth getting? (My interest in the Tchaikovsky is much weaker.)


It's pretty good.  The Tchaikovsky is relatively better, and in both works the soloist is better than the accompaniment.  The only reason I ended up with it is because it is in the Perlman DG box.

TD:

Some small scale works:

The universe is change; life is opinion. - Marcus Aurelius, Meditations

Everything dies - Alien Bounty Hunter, The X-Files

Everyone dies - William Barr, United States Attorney General

kishnevi

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102710 on: November 22, 2017, 07:58:12 PM »

It's pretty good.  The Tchaikovsky is relatively better, and in both works the soloist is better than the accompaniment.  The only reason I ended up with it is because it is in the Perlman DG box.

TD:

Some small scale works:



Actually, I'm not surprised by that difference between soloist and accompanist. Perlman is as good a conductor as Domingo. >:D

TD
Now gone on to the final CD of this excellent set, a miscellany recorded live in Corsica, 2002.


Offline amw

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102711 on: November 22, 2017, 08:11:59 PM »
What I'm supposed to be doing is going to bed.

Anyway... Janine Jansen and friends. You told me it was good. It is. How's this?
Different. Slower across the board (especially in the Scherzo and Trio, one of the few slower recordings of the Scherzo that works well imo), darker sounding w/more emphasis on celli and viola, less perfect in terms of intonation, more vibrato, less energetic, more mysterious, emotionally more extreme. Less "straight". Closer comparisons would be the Pavel Haas Qt or Petersen Qt.

It's not necessarily the last word in Schubert but the way they phrase the second theme in the first movement, with quasi-vocal micro-hesitations, is very attention-getting (in a good way, for me), and if you like that, you'll like the rest of the performance. Similarly the use of vibrato in the 1st violin part in the adagio, which sounds almost like suppressed sobbing.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 08:13:41 PM by amw »

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102712 on: November 22, 2017, 09:06:06 PM »
Stephen Albert's Cello Concerto:



A powerful work. It's a shame Albert died so tragically young.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline André

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102713 on: November 22, 2017, 09:08:43 PM »
I certainly won’t argue with you here. I find Schnittke really came into his own in film music. Obviously, I love a lot of his more serious concert music, but his inventiveness in this medium was quite individual.

Do you own this recording?



If you don’t own it, then please remedy this soon. Schnittke's last film work, The Master and Margarita, is a real hoot. There’s a demented take on Ravel’s Bolero that is guaranteed to put a smile on your face.

Yes I do, and I mentioned it in this very thread a few weeks ago. It’s so good that I was moved to buy the Capriccio box !

You did it

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102714 on: November 22, 2017, 09:28:50 PM »
Stravinsky - Rite Of Spring



Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102715 on: November 22, 2017, 09:36:22 PM »
Yes I do, and I mentioned it in this very thread a few weeks ago. It’s so good that I was moved to buy the Capriccio box !

Great to hear, Andre!
“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

Offline Dancing Divertimentian

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    probably something somebody somewhere is snickering at...wait, Schoenberg! Definitely Schoenberg! (And, let's see, does he have a disciple or two...)...
Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102716 on: November 22, 2017, 10:19:13 PM »
Prokofiev, piano sonatas 5 and 7, Chiu.

Prokofiev seems at his happiest the more he seeks to mock/shock those within earshot, including the performer. Fortunately Chiu is gifted with his own brand of mischievousness which is aligned as a perfect reverse converse, reversed, to the whimsies of Prokofiev. The resulting give-and-go between pianist and composer induces a bag-full of Prokofievian fun. I have a feeling Prokofiev couldn't be prouder. 



Veit Bach-a baker who found his greatest pleasure in a little cittern which he took with him even into the mill and played while the grinding was going on. In this way he had a chance to have the rhythm drilled into him. And this was the beginning of a musical inclination in his descendants. JS Bach

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102717 on: November 22, 2017, 10:19:47 PM »
The 8th:

“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók

Offline kyjo

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102718 on: November 22, 2017, 10:25:52 PM »
Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy. Casella would later go on to develop a more personal style, as exemplified by his wonderful Third Symphony.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2017, 10:29:36 PM by kyjo »
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: What are you listening to now?
« Reply #102719 on: November 22, 2017, 10:30:18 PM »
Casella's Symphony no. 2:



Head-banging stuff! This piece is the polar opposite of what comes to most people's minds when they think of Italian music - it's big, dark, loud, and Mahlerian. Derivative, maybe, but powerful and highly enjoyable nonetheless. The second movement was actually my favorite of the four - a whirling, stomping scherzo that is suffused with supercharged Russian energy.

A pretty nice symphony, but not a favorite of mine from Casella. The Sinfonia (Symphony No. 3), his last symphony, is my favorite with an absolute heart-rendering slow movement, Andante molto moderato quasi adagio. This particular movement, for me, is one of the best things he has composed. The Alun Francis recording is the one to own. Noseda totally misses the point in this slow movement and rushes through some key moments that should have been treated more delicately.
“Competitions are for horses; not artists.” - Béla Bartók