Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 550085 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4260 on: August 29, 2019, 12:53:30 PM »
Interesting and unusual forthcoming release:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4261 on: August 30, 2019, 05:57:30 AM »
Interesting and unusual forthcoming release:


Free - I believe - to members of the RVW Society.  Worth joining anyway - excellent organisation but this is a nice added bonus!

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4262 on: August 30, 2019, 08:46:53 AM »
Symphony No. 2 - A London Symphony:

When I initially explored Vaughan Williams’ symphonic cycle and failed utterly to appreciate “A Sea Symphony” [something which was ultimately rectified], I immediately found redemption in “A London Symphony” with a work that I could readily comprehend and appreciate. Boult delivers a robust and very atmospheric and appealing performance.


Boult:





Boult captures the lyrical opening sequence of the first movement very well; it is a very pastorale like interpretation. Once that sunrise section is complete the city bursts into life. This is reflected in the pace and tone of the music which Boult drives along at a busy pace which is also interspersed with quieter passages. There is a strong, positive conclusion to the opening movement.
The slow movement is poignantly lyrical with occasional lush harmonies. Bould holds back the momentum to great effect whereby the music slowly unveils its beauties. The scoring is wonderful throughout the movement and Boult controls things very well to get the best results from his orchestra.
The Scherzo is delivered in a rather boisterous and buoyant tone and the mood takes a sudden twist at the end of the movement which ends on a somewhat sombre note.
In the final movement the scoring is rich and lush and the music itself is very lyrical. The tone mostly intense with the music being driven. The counterpoint creates some wonderful tensions and drama which Boult depicts well. The movement also contains moments of wonderfully pregnant quieter sections which offer great contrast. The tone is dark, verging on the menacing. The work ends quietly; perhaps a moment of contemplation.





Previn:





Previn offers a wonderfully graceful and atmospheric sunrise. Life suddenly erupts with a bang as the city comes to life. Previn’s depiction is more picturesque and lyrical initially but soon burst out into a burly, exuberant and turbulent episode which is then followed by the quieter passage which is almost mystical in this presentation with those beguiling woodwinds. There is a robust and spirited conclusion to the first movement with strong brass evident.
There is a strong poignancy depicted in the slow movement but it is also augmented with a somewhat forlorn and disconcerting tone with a tinge of melancholy. Although it is dark the tone does not quite descend into despondency. Previn’s presentation is lyrically on the dark side for me and it is quite absorbing. Previn also exploits the dynamic range of this movement to full effect.
The Scherzo is a suitably energetic affair and I like the way that Previn ushers the music in waves, continuously ebbing and flowing,  through the use of the inherent dynamics of the scoring. I also like the way that Previn handles the change in pace and tone at the conclusion of the movement.
The music of the final movement is lush and lyrical and Previn delivers on both counts. The tone is somewhat on the dark side, perhaps more meditative and apprehensive rather than despondent. There then comes that surge in intensity and pace which Previn drives well accentuating the sense of turbulence and uncertainty in a dramatic performance. This sense of apprehension and uncertainty defines the contemplative nature of the conclusion of this fine work.
This is a strong but lyrical and contemplative version of this work and I like Previn’s vision of the music.




Barbirolli:






Barbirolli’s version of the sunrise is expansive and, I feel, somewhat more considered than others that I have heard. Life, once again, erupts with a bang here as the city comes to life. Barbirolli’s depiction of a morning bustle of a leading world city is valid and exciting. I like his treatment of the woodwinds: it is somewhat understated and subtle but effective. Those “quieter” passages are handled sensitively and lyrically. The conclusion of the first movement is a big, bold performance.
Barbirolli’s slow movement is, for me, a somewhat dark and meditative reading but without being ponderous in any way. There is a delightful ray of sunshine that suddenly emerges towards the conclusion of the movement and we conclude on a positive and more optimistic note.
The Scherzo is a very light and airy affair which is delivered in a very ardent and assertive tone at times for the most part. The scoring for the conclusion is obviously darker in tone and Barbirolli explores these shadows very well.
The final movement is a robust and powerful performance. It is definitely both assertive and atmospheric in its delivery with lots of drama on display. This movement has a fine sense of gravitas and it is gripping, intense and has a strong presence to it.

I have listened to this version relatively recently and listening to it again shortly after listening to the versions under both Boult and Previn I am getting a slightly different “feel” from this Barbirolli version. I have found it to be a somewhat darker and also a more turbulent version than I first thought of it in isolation [which is interesting in itself].

The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4263 on: August 30, 2019, 11:54:00 AM »
Symphony No. 2 - A London Symphony:

When I initially explored Vaughan Williams’ symphonic cycle and failed utterly to appreciate “A Sea Symphony” [something which was ultimately rectified], I immediately found redemption in “A London Symphony” with a work that I could readily comprehend and appreciate. Boult delivers a robust and very atmospheric and appealing performance.


Boult:





Boult captures the lyrical opening sequence of the first movement very well; it is a very pastorale like interpretation. Once that sunrise section is complete the city bursts into life. This is reflected in the pace and tone of the music which Boult drives along at a busy pace which is also interspersed with quieter passages. There is a strong, positive conclusion to the opening movement.
The slow movement is poignantly lyrical with occasional lush harmonies. Bould holds back the momentum to great effect whereby the music slowly unveils its beauties. The scoring is wonderful throughout the movement and Boult controls things very well to get the best results from his orchestra.
The Scherzo is delivered in a rather boisterous and buoyant tone and the mood takes a sudden twist at the end of the movement which ends on a somewhat sombre note.
In the final movement the scoring is rich and lush and the music itself is very lyrical. The tone mostly intense with the music being driven. The counterpoint creates some wonderful tensions and drama which Boult depicts well. The movement also contains moments of wonderfully pregnant quieter sections which offer great contrast. The tone is dark, verging on the menacing. The work ends quietly; perhaps a moment of contemplation.





Previn:





Previn offers a wonderfully graceful and atmospheric sunrise. Life suddenly erupts with a bang as the city comes to life. Previn’s depiction is more picturesque and lyrical initially but soon burst out into a burly, exuberant and turbulent episode which is then followed by the quieter passage which is almost mystical in this presentation with those beguiling woodwinds. There is a robust and spirited conclusion to the first movement with strong brass evident.
There is a strong poignancy depicted in the slow movement but it is also augmented with a somewhat forlorn and disconcerting tone with a tinge of melancholy. Although it is dark the tone does not quite descend into despondency. Previn’s presentation is lyrically on the dark side for me and it is quite absorbing. Previn also exploits the dynamic range of this movement to full effect.
The Scherzo is a suitably energetic affair and I like the way that Previn ushers the music in waves, continuously ebbing and flowing,  through the use of the inherent dynamics of the scoring. I also like the way that Previn handles the change in pace and tone at the conclusion of the movement.
The music of the final movement is lush and lyrical and Previn delivers on both counts. The tone is somewhat on the dark side, perhaps more meditative and apprehensive rather than despondent. There then comes that surge in intensity and pace which Previn drives well accentuating the sense of turbulence and uncertainty in a dramatic performance. This sense of apprehension and uncertainty defines the contemplative nature of the conclusion of this fine work.
This is a strong but lyrical and contemplative version of this work and I like Previn’s vision of the music.




Barbirolli:






Barbirolli’s version of the sunrise is expansive and, I feel, somewhat more considered than others that I have heard. Life, once again, erupts with a bang here as the city comes to life. Barbirolli’s depiction of a morning bustle of a leading world city is valid and exciting. I like his treatment of the woodwinds: it is somewhat understated and subtle but effective. Those “quieter” passages are handled sensitively and lyrically. The conclusion of the first movement is a big, bold performance.
Barbirolli’s slow movement is, for me, a somewhat dark and meditative reading but without being ponderous in any way. There is a delightful ray of sunshine that suddenly emerges towards the conclusion of the movement and we conclude on a positive and more optimistic note.
The Scherzo is a very light and airy affair which is delivered in a very ardent and assertive tone at times for the most part. The scoring for the conclusion is obviously darker in tone and Barbirolli explores these shadows very well.
The final movement is a robust and powerful performance. It is definitely both assertive and atmospheric in its delivery with lots of drama on display. This movement has a fine sense of gravitas and it is gripping, intense and has a strong presence to it.

I have listened to this version relatively recently and listening to it again shortly after listening to the versions under both Boult and Previn I am getting a slightly different “feel” from this Barbirolli version. I have found it to be a somewhat darker and also a more turbulent version than I first thought of it in isolation [which is interesting in itself].

Fantastic description! Very interesting to read.

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4264 on: August 30, 2019, 01:23:41 PM »
Thanks for those reviews SymphonicAddict, very interesting. And those are all great recordings.
In fact I was just thinking that Vaughan Williams is one of those composers who seems to bring out the best in conductors, I’ve heard almost no poor performances of Vaughan Williams’ symphonies on disk. His is not the sort of music where conductors have to really work hard to make it work.

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4265 on: August 30, 2019, 02:06:03 PM »
Thanks for those reviews SymphonicAddict, very interesting. And those are all great recordings.
In fact I was just thinking that Vaughan Williams is one of those composers who seems to bring out the best in conductors, I’ve heard almost no poor performances of Vaughan Williams’ symphonies on disk. His is not the sort of music where conductors have to really work hard to make it work.

The author of those reviews is aligreto, not me, so the gratefulness goes for him.  ;)
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 02:46:23 PM by SymphonicAddict »

SymphonicAddict

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4266 on: August 30, 2019, 02:51:26 PM »
Interesting and unusual forthcoming release:


Albion's Journey: Will it be a documentary about him? or, a new work, or a compilation of them?

Edit: Taken from the RVW Society webpage.

https://rvwsociety.com/albions-journey/

"By popular demand, the album begins with the first recording of The Robin’s Nest, which is the first piece known to have been written by Vaughan Williams, in his sixth year."
« Last Edit: August 30, 2019, 02:54:57 PM by SymphonicAddict »

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4267 on: August 31, 2019, 12:13:01 PM »
The author of those reviews is aligreto, not me, so the gratefulness goes for him.  ;)

Sorry aligreto.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4268 on: August 31, 2019, 12:19:21 PM »
Free - I believe - to members of the RVW Society.  Worth joining anyway - excellent organisation but this is a nice added bonus!
That's good news as I'm a member of the society! Thanks. I must cancel my pre-order with Amazon. You've just saved me £8.99  :)
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 12:31:42 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4269 on: August 31, 2019, 12:24:59 PM »
Albion's Journey: Will it be a documentary about him? or, a new work, or a compilation of them?

Edit: Taken from the RVW Society webpage.

https://rvwsociety.com/albions-journey/

"By popular demand, the album begins with the first recording of The Robin’s Nest, which is the first piece known to have been written by Vaughan Williams, in his sixth year."

A CD with his music interspersed with extracts of the composer talking about his life and the music of others. It includes the first recording of 'The Robin's Nest', his first composition, aged six I think.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4270 on: August 31, 2019, 12:28:45 PM »
Symphony No. 2 - A London Symphony:

When I initially explored Vaughan Williams’ symphonic cycle and failed utterly to appreciate “A Sea Symphony” [something which was ultimately rectified], I immediately found redemption in “A London Symphony” with a work that I could readily comprehend and appreciate. Boult delivers a robust and very atmospheric and appealing performance.


Boult:





Boult captures the lyrical opening sequence of the first movement very well; it is a very pastorale like interpretation. Once that sunrise section is complete the city bursts into life. This is reflected in the pace and tone of the music which Boult drives along at a busy pace which is also interspersed with quieter passages. There is a strong, positive conclusion to the opening movement.
The slow movement is poignantly lyrical with occasional lush harmonies. Bould holds back the momentum to great effect whereby the music slowly unveils its beauties. The scoring is wonderful throughout the movement and Boult controls things very well to get the best results from his orchestra.
The Scherzo is delivered in a rather boisterous and buoyant tone and the mood takes a sudden twist at the end of the movement which ends on a somewhat sombre note.
In the final movement the scoring is rich and lush and the music itself is very lyrical. The tone mostly intense with the music being driven. The counterpoint creates some wonderful tensions and drama which Boult depicts well. The movement also contains moments of wonderfully pregnant quieter sections which offer great contrast. The tone is dark, verging on the menacing. The work ends quietly; perhaps a moment of contemplation.





Previn:





Previn offers a wonderfully graceful and atmospheric sunrise. Life suddenly erupts with a bang as the city comes to life. Previn’s depiction is more picturesque and lyrical initially but soon burst out into a burly, exuberant and turbulent episode which is then followed by the quieter passage which is almost mystical in this presentation with those beguiling woodwinds. There is a robust and spirited conclusion to the first movement with strong brass evident.
There is a strong poignancy depicted in the slow movement but it is also augmented with a somewhat forlorn and disconcerting tone with a tinge of melancholy. Although it is dark the tone does not quite descend into despondency. Previn’s presentation is lyrically on the dark side for me and it is quite absorbing. Previn also exploits the dynamic range of this movement to full effect.
The Scherzo is a suitably energetic affair and I like the way that Previn ushers the music in waves, continuously ebbing and flowing,  through the use of the inherent dynamics of the scoring. I also like the way that Previn handles the change in pace and tone at the conclusion of the movement.
The music of the final movement is lush and lyrical and Previn delivers on both counts. The tone is somewhat on the dark side, perhaps more meditative and apprehensive rather than despondent. There then comes that surge in intensity and pace which Previn drives well accentuating the sense of turbulence and uncertainty in a dramatic performance. This sense of apprehension and uncertainty defines the contemplative nature of the conclusion of this fine work.
This is a strong but lyrical and contemplative version of this work and I like Previn’s vision of the music.




Barbirolli:






Barbirolli’s version of the sunrise is expansive and, I feel, somewhat more considered than others that I have heard. Life, once again, erupts with a bang here as the city comes to life. Barbirolli’s depiction of a morning bustle of a leading world city is valid and exciting. I like his treatment of the woodwinds: it is somewhat understated and subtle but effective. Those “quieter” passages are handled sensitively and lyrically. The conclusion of the first movement is a big, bold performance.
Barbirolli’s slow movement is, for me, a somewhat dark and meditative reading but without being ponderous in any way. There is a delightful ray of sunshine that suddenly emerges towards the conclusion of the movement and we conclude on a positive and more optimistic note.
The Scherzo is a very light and airy affair which is delivered in a very ardent and assertive tone at times for the most part. The scoring for the conclusion is obviously darker in tone and Barbirolli explores these shadows very well.
The final movement is a robust and powerful performance. It is definitely both assertive and atmospheric in its delivery with lots of drama on display. This movement has a fine sense of gravitas and it is gripping, intense and has a strong presence to it.

I have listened to this version relatively recently and listening to it again shortly after listening to the versions under both Boult and Previn I am getting a slightly different “feel” from this Barbirolli version. I have found it to be a somewhat darker and also a more turbulent version than I first thought of it in isolation [which is interesting in itself].
A fabulous comparative analysis of three great recordings Fergus. I would also add Boult's later EMI recording, with which I grew up (I had the Boult LP set when I was 17). I tend to listen mainly to the 1920 version now (Goossens, Yates or Brabbins):
« Last Edit: August 31, 2019, 12:37:34 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4271 on: September 01, 2019, 04:09:05 AM »
Fantastic description! Very interesting to read.


A fabulous comparative analysis of three great recordings Fergus. I would also add Boult's later EMI recording, with which I grew up (I had the Boult LP set when I was 17). I tend to listen mainly to the 1920 version now (Goossens, Yates or Brabbins):



Thank you guys but modesty forces me to reject the high praise. I merely say it as I hear it  :-[
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4272 on: September 01, 2019, 04:15:54 AM »
.... I would also add Boult's later EMI recording, with which I grew up (I had the Boult LP set when I was 17). I tend to listen mainly to the 1920 version now (Goossens, Yates or Brabbins):




Thank you for that Jeffrey. I obviously do not have that version in my collection nor have I heard it. It would make for an interesting comparative listening session I think.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4273 on: September 01, 2019, 04:26:55 AM »
Sorry aligreto.

No apology required. It was a genuine mistake. There was no offence meant and certainly none taken. I am just glad that you enjoyed the read.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4274 on: September 01, 2019, 10:01:49 AM »
Thank you for that Jeffrey. I obviously do not have that version in my collection nor have I heard it. It would make for an interesting comparative listening session I think.
My pleasure Fergus. The LP/CD are available fairly inexpensively on Amazon UK if you want to hear this fine performance:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4275 on: September 01, 2019, 10:35:23 AM »
A fabulous comparative analysis of three great recordings Fergus. I would also add Boult's later EMI recording, with which I grew up (I had the Boult LP set when I was 17). I tend to listen mainly to the 1920 version now (Goossens, Yates or Brabbins):

I recently got disproportionately pleased to track down/buy a copy of the 1920 version score.  This was the 1st version of the symphony to be published as part of the "Carnegie Collection of British Music" - and rare to buy now.  So I was a little miffed when it arrived to see a small "revised edition" printed on the front cover that I had missed.  Basically Stainer & Bell - the publisher of the 'final'/standard revision had knicked the artwork of the 1920 Carnegie edition and used it for their more recent version. My fault for not spotting that on the photo so I had to keep it!

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4276 on: September 01, 2019, 11:59:43 AM »
My pleasure Fergus. The LP/CD are available fairly inexpensively on Amazon UK if you want to hear this fine performance:





Thank you for the recommendations Jeffrey.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Online aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4277 on: September 01, 2019, 12:02:14 PM »
I recently got disproportionately pleased to track down/buy a copy of the 1920 version score.  This was the 1st version of the symphony to be published as part of the "Carnegie Collection of British Music" - and rare to buy now.  So I was a little miffed when it arrived to see a small "revised edition" printed on the front cover that I had missed.  Basically Stainer & Bell - the publisher of the 'final'/standard revision had knicked the artwork of the 1920 Carnegie edition and used it for their more recent version. My fault for not spotting that on the photo so I had to keep it!

We are all guilty from time to time of lapses in attention to detail. Some are more costly than others. We live and learn, hopefully, and move on.
The ability to talk comes with knowledge. The ability to listen comes with wisdom.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4278 on: September 03, 2019, 01:53:05 AM »
I recently got disproportionately pleased to track down/buy a copy of the 1920 version score.  This was the 1st version of the symphony to be published as part of the "Carnegie Collection of British Music" - and rare to buy now.  So I was a little miffed when it arrived to see a small "revised edition" printed on the front cover that I had missed.  Basically Stainer & Bell - the publisher of the 'final'/standard revision had knicked the artwork of the 1920 Carnegie edition and used it for their more recent version. My fault for not spotting that on the photo so I had to keep it!
That must have been very annoying I'm sure. I once bought a copy of 'Dona Nobis Pacem' by Vaughan Williams on LP whilst visiting a friend in Manchester (I was then living in London). It was a second hand version with Maurice Abravanel conducting the Utah SO and was my first contact with that fine work. However I didn't  bother to check if they had put the right vinyl in the sleeve and it was only when I got on the train to return to London, when I thought I should check the condition of the LP, that, to my horror, I discovered that it contained an LP featuring Schubert's 'Trout Quintet'! I had to take a flying leap off the train just before it was about to move out of the station.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4279 on: September 03, 2019, 08:28:26 AM »
That must have been very annoying I'm sure. I once bought a copy of 'Dona Nobis Pacem' by Vaughan Williams on LP whilst visiting a friend in Manchester (I was then living in London). It was a second hand version with Maurice Abravanel conducting the Utah SO and was my first contact with that fine work. However I didn't  bother to check if they had put the right vinyl in the sleeve and it was only when I got on the train to return to London, when I thought I should check the condition of the LP, that, to my horror, I discovered that it contained an LP featuring Schubert's 'Trout Quintet'! I had to take a flying leap off the train just before it was about to move out of the station.
Schubert offers sufficient justification to even jump out of a moving train. 8)
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948