Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 669201 times)

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Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4420 on: February 13, 2020, 09:52:09 AM »
The "House of Life (Rossetti) " and "Songs of Travel (Stevenson)" in piano version are bloody superb.

There.

Back to rummaging that box.

As you were.
Olivier

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4421 on: February 13, 2020, 11:30:55 AM »
The "House of Life (Rossetti) " and "Songs of Travel (Stevenson)" in piano version are bloody superb.

There.

Back to rummaging that box.

As you were.
I like both versions of the 'Songs of Travel' very much. The orchestral version must be one of a very VW works conducted by Simon Rattle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4422 on: February 13, 2020, 12:09:35 PM »
I like both versions of the 'Songs of Travel' very much. The orchestral version must be one of a very VW works conducted by Simon Rattle.

The orchestral version did not work for me at all, and now that I see it is with Rattle, that explains it (never clicked with anything conducted by him, just always feeling flat  :blank:). the piano version was a revelation in comparison, among many other works so far.
Olivier

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4423 on: February 13, 2020, 12:23:37 PM »
.with Rattle, that explains it (never clicked with anything conducted by him, just always feeling flat  :blank:).

See what you mean ('Much Ado About Not-Really-That-Much', a well-known comedy), yet he did some really fine recordings, like:

… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4424 on: February 13, 2020, 02:49:29 PM »
See what you mean ('Much Ado About Not-Really-That-Much', a well-known comedy), yet he did some really fine recordings, like:


Yes, the Szymanowski is a fine CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4425 on: February 13, 2020, 05:44:14 PM »
Damn, the No. 6 with Boult/LPO was so good.  My new favorite and top of list.  The slow final movement really makes this movement but also the first movement is incredibly intense in this performance.  Top notch.  I'm so glad that RVW agreed with me on the finale.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 05:46:30 PM by relm1 »

Offline Daverz

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4426 on: February 13, 2020, 08:44:15 PM »
I'm with Vandermolen; Boult/(Decca) is my favorite though Boult/EMI is a runner-up along with Berglund and Haitink.

Sarge

Agree on the Boult/EMI.  Have not heard the Decca (I paid for 2 speakers, dammit).  Had forgotten the EMI was with the Philharmonia rather than LPO.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 08:49:07 PM by Daverz »

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4427 on: February 13, 2020, 11:07:46 PM »
Agree on the Boult/EMI.  Have not heard the Decca (I paid for 2 speakers, dammit).  Had forgotten the EMI was with the Philharmonia rather than LPO.
You have to hear the Decca!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4428 on: February 13, 2020, 11:37:35 PM »
I'm so glad that RVW agreed with me on the finale.

Do you have it in writing?  ???
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline relm1

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4429 on: February 14, 2020, 07:25:23 AM »
Do you have it in writing?  ???

It's based on his speech at the end of the album where he references "a wonderful performance of the epilogue...absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension". 

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4430 on: February 14, 2020, 08:09:46 AM »
It's based on his speech at the end of the album where he references "a wonderful performance of the epilogue...absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension".

Not to mention his thanks to 'the lady harpist'.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4431 on: February 14, 2020, 09:51:14 AM »
Not to mention his thanks to 'the lady harpist'.
 :)

.. and, of course, a wonderful epilogue, absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension "for three hours on end", IRCC  :D
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4432 on: February 19, 2020, 11:20:28 AM »
.... As with Symphony No.6 much as I admire the EMI version I prefer the earlier Decca recording.


Comparison of Boul't EMI/Decca recordings:



   




I have now done an A/B listening comparison test between both the EMI and the Decca recordings. The Decca is, I agree, far more robust, assertive and intense in its presentation and has a far greater presence and atmosphere as a result over the EMI version. There is not much wrong with the EMI recording but the Decca recording takes the presentation to another level. However, as in the case with Previn, I do not like the inclusion of the suggested narrative in the Decca recording.
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4433 on: February 19, 2020, 01:57:39 PM »
Comparison of Boul't EMI/Decca recordings:



   




I have now done an A/B listening comparison test between both the EMI and the Decca recordings. The Decca is, I agree, far more robust, assertive and intense in its presentation and has a far greater presence and atmosphere as a result over the EMI version. There is not much wrong with the EMI recording but the Decca recording takes the presentation to another level. However, as in the case with Previn, I do not like the inclusion of the suggested narrative in the Decca recording.
Interesting. Thanks for that Fergus. I'll be interested to hear what you make of the other symphonies.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline aligreto

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4434 on: February 21, 2020, 08:17:21 AM »
I'll be interested to hear what you make of the other symphonies.

Coming soon to a thread near you  ;D
It is better to remain silent and be thought a fool than to speak and leave no doubt.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4435 on: February 22, 2020, 01:31:45 AM »
Coming soon to a thread near you  ;D
Excellent!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4436 on: February 22, 2020, 05:50:05 AM »
post of 6th Feb 2020 : have the Handley cycle, Hickox 2 (1913), Sold the Davis cycle... what should I order....

As of today, 22nd Feb 2020...

Received and enjoyed greatly:

- Previn 3-4
- Haitink 7
- Barbirolli 2-8
- Boult EMI (listened and thrilled by 4-6-8-9 so far, others to be listened to yet - the "fillers" I went through mostly in the Collectors edition in this last fortnight and loved them already)
- Mellers book on the reading pile. Looking at Kennedy's and Day's.

on the way:

- Thomson 6
- Thomson 9
- Previn full cycle
- Bakels 5-9

Soon to be bought :

- Thomson 2-3-4-5-8
- Haitink full cycle (sarge's advocacies have a good track record with me in other composers...the slowness would appeal to me i think once I am more familiar with the "normal" versions)

The symphonies are slowing imprinting... 2 with the lento, 3 with the bugler/trumpet, 4 & 6 with the rage and anger, 5 with the tears- inducing romanza, 7 with the chills, 8 & 9... for their mishmash...  ;D

Been going through the full collectors edition as well...

Standout works for far in no particular order : Lark, Serenade to music, Piano Cto (1 piano version), Oboe Concerto, Towards the unknown region, dona Nobis Pacem, Job, Wasps, English Folk songs suite, Tallis, Greensleeves, Norfolk Rhapsody 1, Mass in G minor, Tuba Cto, Wenlock, Fen Country, Ten Blake Songs, Travel songs (piano version), House of Life, concerto Grosso, The Truth from above, Poisoned kiss, Old King Cole...-

Partial misses or dislikes: the string quartets, Violin sonata, most of the hymnal music, Xmas Carols fantasia, mystical songs, Partita for double orchestra, Prelude and Fugue, Romance...plenty yet to go through though.

I've read through most of the 222 pages here and the contributions and knowledge here have been invaluable, thank you. Ralph and I have properly clicked...at last... given the response i have to his music right now, it may head straight for a personal top 5....maybe 3.... now that would be something...

Olivier

Offline Sergeant Rock

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4437 on: February 22, 2020, 06:10:51 AM »
Ralph and I have properly clicked...at last...

Excellent! Quite happy to read that. Vaughan Williams is one of my top 10 composers. I'm glad he's made a positive impact on you too.

Sarge
the phone rings and somebody says,
"hey, they made a movie about
Mahler, you ought to go see it.
he was as f*cked-up as you are."
                               --Charles Bukowski, "Mahler"

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4438 on: February 22, 2020, 11:55:21 PM »
Excellent! Quite happy to read that. Vaughan Williams is one of my top 10 composers. I'm glad he's made a positive impact on you too.

Sarge
+1
I wonder what Olivier will make of 'Riders to the Sea' and Pilgrim's Progress.

Other works I didn't notice on Olivier's list are:

Sancta Civitas (perhaps his greatest choral work)
Five Variants on Dives and Lazarus (which VW chose to have performed at his funeral)
Job: A Masque for Dancing
I like the fill-ups on Hickox's CD of Symphony No.5 such as The Pilgrim's Pavement.

As for books, if you can find a copy I'd recommend Roy Douglas's short book 'Working with RVW'. I had the pleasure of having tea with Roy Douglas (who lived to be over 100) as he lived locally.
« Last Edit: February 22, 2020, 11:58:17 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline aukhawk

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4439 on: February 23, 2020, 01:30:07 AM »
Five Tudor Portraits.
A mixed bag but I like the middle three - Pretty Bess, Epitaph, Jane Scroop - very much.