Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 620626 times)

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Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4420 on: February 13, 2020, 09:52:09 AM »
The "House of Life (Rossetti) " and "Songs of Travel (Stevenson)" in piano version are bloody superb.

There.

Back to rummaging that box.

As you were.
Olivier

Online vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4421 on: February 13, 2020, 11:30:55 AM »
The "House of Life (Rossetti) " and "Songs of Travel (Stevenson)" in piano version are bloody superb.

There.

Back to rummaging that box.

As you were.
I like both versions of the 'Songs of Travel' very much. The orchestral version must be one of a very VW works conducted by Simon Rattle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Papy Oli

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4422 on: February 13, 2020, 12:09:35 PM »
I like both versions of the 'Songs of Travel' very much. The orchestral version must be one of a very VW works conducted by Simon Rattle.

The orchestral version did not work for me at all, and now that I see it is with Rattle, that explains it (never clicked with anything conducted by him, just always feeling flat  :blank:). the piano version was a revelation in comparison, among many other works so far.
Olivier

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4423 on: February 13, 2020, 12:23:37 PM »
.with Rattle, that explains it (never clicked with anything conducted by him, just always feeling flat  :blank:).

See what you mean ('Much Ado About Not-Really-That-Much', a well-known comedy), yet he did some really fine recordings, like:

… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Online vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4424 on: February 13, 2020, 02:49:29 PM »
See what you mean ('Much Ado About Not-Really-That-Much', a well-known comedy), yet he did some really fine recordings, like:


Yes, the Szymanowski is a fine CD.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4425 on: February 13, 2020, 05:44:14 PM »
Damn, the No. 6 with Boult/LPO was so good.  My new favorite and top of list.  The slow final movement really makes this movement but also the first movement is incredibly intense in this performance.  Top notch.  I'm so glad that RVW agreed with me on the finale.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 05:46:30 PM by relm1 »

Offline Daverz

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4426 on: February 13, 2020, 08:44:15 PM »
I'm with Vandermolen; Boult/(Decca) is my favorite though Boult/EMI is a runner-up along with Berglund and Haitink.

Sarge

Agree on the Boult/EMI.  Have not heard the Decca (I paid for 2 speakers, dammit).  Had forgotten the EMI was with the Philharmonia rather than LPO.
« Last Edit: February 13, 2020, 08:49:07 PM by Daverz »

Online vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4427 on: February 13, 2020, 11:07:46 PM »
Agree on the Boult/EMI.  Have not heard the Decca (I paid for 2 speakers, dammit).  Had forgotten the EMI was with the Philharmonia rather than LPO.
You have to hear the Decca!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4428 on: February 13, 2020, 11:37:35 PM »
I'm so glad that RVW agreed with me on the finale.

Do you have it in writing?  ???
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline relm1

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4429 on: February 14, 2020, 07:25:23 AM »
Do you have it in writing?  ???

It's based on his speech at the end of the album where he references "a wonderful performance of the epilogue...absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension". 

Online vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4430 on: February 14, 2020, 08:09:46 AM »
It's based on his speech at the end of the album where he references "a wonderful performance of the epilogue...absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension".

Not to mention his thanks to 'the lady harpist'.
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4431 on: February 14, 2020, 09:51:14 AM »
Not to mention his thanks to 'the lady harpist'.
 :)

.. and, of course, a wonderful epilogue, absolute pianissimo full of meaning and tension "for three hours on end", IRCC  :D
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948