Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 657420 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4560 on: June 14, 2020, 01:18:05 PM »
I recall a discussion a while back about the superscriptions before each movement of Sinfonia Antartica and whether they should be read out or not. With that in mind I was interested in an article on recording the Vaughan Williams symphonies by Andrew Keener in the latest edition of the RVW Society Journal in which the following is stated:

'...'[Gielgud's] participation approved by Vaughan Williams himself for Boult's first recording' (of Sinfonia Antartica;) so it seems that VW did approve of the spoken commentary before the movements.




"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Biffo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4561 on: June 14, 2020, 11:51:13 PM »
I recall a discussion a while back about the superscriptions before each movement of Sinfonia Antartica and whether they should be read out or not. With that in mind I was interested in an article on recording the Vaughan Williams symphonies by Andrew Keener in the latest edition of the RVW Society Journal in which the following is stated:

'...'[Gielgud's] participation approved by Vaughan Williams himself for Boult's first recording' (of Sinfonia Antartica;) so it seems that VW did approve of the spoken commentary before the movements.

Possibly it just means RVW approved it (or aquiesced) for that recording. There were no spoken superscriptions for Barbirolli's world premiere recording and Boult didn't repeat the experiment in his later recording.

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4562 on: June 15, 2020, 04:43:29 AM »
Possibly it just means RVW approved it (or aquiesced) for that recording. There were no spoken superscriptions for Barbirolli's world premiere recording and Boult didn't repeat the experiment in his later recording.
Yes, that's quite true, although other conductors (Previn for example) did include them - but at least it shows that they weren't included without Vaughan Williams's approval.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4563 on: June 20, 2020, 12:52:24 PM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera The Poisoned Kiss (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s
« Last Edit: June 21, 2020, 03:18:39 PM by kyjo »
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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4564 on: June 20, 2020, 01:05:17 PM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera Sir John in Love (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s

That sounds nice to hear, Kyle. I have heard that opera, it features some mellifluous and lovely music. The best moments are found in acts III and IV. As a synthesis that piece should work rather well.

Offline calyptorhynchus

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4565 on: June 20, 2020, 02:12:41 PM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera Sir John in Love (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s

Should be good, but I hope it brings more people to listen to Sir John in Love itself, which is great.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4566 on: June 20, 2020, 02:35:04 PM »
Should be good, but I hope it brings more people to listen to Sir John in Love itself, which is great.

I doubt it will. I don’t think Kyle is too keen on operatic music and, quite frankly, I’m not too far behind him in that opinion.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4567 on: June 20, 2020, 11:35:18 PM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera Sir John in Love (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s
Oh interesting Kyle. I have that CD so must listen to that work, although other than 'Riders to the Sea' and 'Pilgrim's Progress', I never listen to VW's operas. Maybe I should?

Placing this here because Grace Williams was a pupil of VW's and her impressive Second Symphony might appeal to admirers of VW's symphonies 6 and 4. I played Grace Williams's symphony yesterday and the themes have been running through my head ever since. This ranks with the 4th Symphony of Ruth Gipps as my favourite written by a female composer. I wonder how many others here know this work:
« Last Edit: June 21, 2020, 12:46:55 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Biffo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4568 on: June 21, 2020, 01:16:23 AM »
Oh interesting Kyle. I have that CD so must listen to that work, although other than 'Riders to the Sea' and 'Pilgrim's Progress', I never listen to VW's operas. Maybe I should?

Placing this here because Grace Williams was a pupil of VW's and her impressive Second Symphony might appeal to admirers of VW's symphonies 6 and 4. I played Grace Williams's symphony yesterday and the themes have been running through my head ever since. This ranks with the 4th Symphony of Ruth Gipps as my favourite written by a female composer. I wonder how many others here know this work:


You should give Hugh the Drover at least one try. RVW called it a ballad opera and some might find it a bit too folky but it has some fine music. If you don't fancy the idea of the complete opera there is a abridged version called A Cotswold Romance .

Offline Roasted Swan

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4569 on: June 21, 2020, 01:23:22 AM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera Sir John in Love (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s

A Road paved with Stars is a synthesis of "The Poisoned Kiss" NOT "Sir John in Love"

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4570 on: June 21, 2020, 02:12:40 AM »
You should give Hugh the Drover at least one try. RVW called it a ballad opera and some might find it a bit too folky but it has some fine music. If you don't fancy the idea of the complete opera there is a abridged version called A Cotswold Romance .
Thank you Biffo. I have a complete recording of 'Hugh the Drover' and the Cotswold work. I think that I've made a couple of attempts with 'Hugh' but gave up after a few minutes finding it too 'hey, nonny, no - Ye Olde English Tea Shoppe' - but that is, no doubt, a comment on my own intolerance rather than anything else. So, thanks for the suggestion and I will have another battle with Hugh soon.

Also, I can't stand Morris Dancing (my wife loves watching it - which is my idea of Hell)  ::)
« Last Edit: June 21, 2020, 02:16:21 AM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4571 on: June 21, 2020, 03:17:05 PM »
That sounds nice to hear, Kyle. I have heard that opera, it features some mellifluous and lovely music. The best moments are found in acts III and IV. As a synthesis that piece should work rather well.

Good to know about the complete opera, Cesar. I should give it a spin at some point. I assume you’re referring to Sir John in Love, which I erroneously said A Road Paved With Stars is based off.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2020, 03:20:52 PM by kyjo »
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4572 on: June 21, 2020, 03:17:50 PM »
A Road paved with Stars is a synthesis of "The Poisoned Kiss" NOT "Sir John in Love"

You’re right! My apologies. :-[
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4573 on: June 21, 2020, 03:26:01 PM »
I doubt it will. I don’t think Kyle is too keen on operatic music and, quite frankly, I’m not too far behind him in that opinion.

Actually, I’ve been slowly getting into opera, and have enjoyed some of the few that I’ve listened to recently. The main reason I don’t listen to more opera is not really because of dislike for the genre, but mainly just because of the sheer time commitment of sitting down to listen to an often 2 1/2 or 3 hour long (or longer!) work. Hearing Puccini’s Turandot on the radio yesterday and being quite enthralled by it reminded me that I need to set aside more time to listen to opera!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4574 on: June 21, 2020, 05:53:01 PM »
Actually, I’ve been slowly getting into opera, and have enjoyed some of the few that I’ve listened to recently. The main reason I don’t listen to more opera is not really because of dislike for the genre, but mainly just because of the sheer time commitment of sitting down to listen to an often 2 1/2 or 3 hour long (or longer!) work. Hearing Puccini’s Turandot on the radio yesterday and being quite enthralled by it reminded me that I need to set aside more time to listen to opera!

Personally, there’s just never enough orchestral meat for me in opera, but some of my favorites are a bold exception as they do have many wonderful orchestral moments.
“There will be sunshine again and the violins will sing of peace on earth.” - Closing line from Weinberg’s Symphony No. 6, Op. 79

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4575 on: June 22, 2020, 06:06:21 AM »
Recently I’ve fell in love with A Road All Paved With Stars, which is a 27-minute “orchestral synthesis/symphonic rhapsody” created by Adrian Williams of key themes from RVW’s opera The Poisoned Kiss (which I haven’t heard). Purists may not like this, I suppose, and I’m not sure how much of it is “pure” RVW. But, quite frankly, I do not care! This is truly some glorious, heart-easing, tuneful, and characterful music which I urge you all to hear. It completely exceeded my expectations! It’s included on this CD:



https://youtu.be/FbLgH5YFb-s
Sounds intriguing Kyle!  I don't know the other works on that CD.  Are they early works of Vaughan Williams?

PD
« Last Edit: June 22, 2020, 06:09:05 AM by Pohjolas Daughter »

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4576 on: June 22, 2020, 06:08:00 AM »
Placing this here because Grace Williams was a pupil of VW's and her impressive Second Symphony might appeal to admirers of VW's symphonies 6 and 4. I played Grace Williams's symphony yesterday and the themes have been running through my head ever since. This ranks with the 4th Symphony of Ruth Gipps as my favourite written by a female composer. I wonder how many others here know this work:

I don't know her works Jeffrey, but you've certainly intrigued me! 

PD

Offline Irons

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4577 on: June 22, 2020, 06:46:25 AM »
I don't know her works Jeffrey, but you've certainly intrigued me! 

PD

Set in stone Bantock this evening but thanks to Jeffrey the earth has moved and Grace Williams comes out top. As I recall the symphony Jeffrey is correct in comparing Williams 2nd to the most driven of Vaughan Williams symphonies. I am due a revisit anyway.
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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4578 on: June 22, 2020, 07:19:23 AM »
I might have to get that Grace Williams recording. Damn, this forum is costing me a lot of money. ;D
“There will be sunshine again and the violins will sing of peace on earth.” - Closing line from Weinberg’s Symphony No. 6, Op. 79

Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #4579 on: June 22, 2020, 07:33:54 AM »
Personally, there’s just never enough orchestral meat for me in opera, but some of my favorites are a bold exception as they do have many wonderful orchestral moments.

I find there to be enough orchestral “meat” in the 20th-century operas I’ve heard! :)
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff