Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 797539 times)

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5060 on: June 13, 2021, 10:10:00 PM »
I don’t listen to film music very often, but I like that Three Portraits from the England of Elizabeth quite a bit. It was featured in the Previn cycle of symphonies.
Previn's performance is the best I think. Christo likes the Three Portraits as well.
I forgot to mention that I do like Elder's 'Job' and 'Songs of Travel'.
« Last Edit: June 13, 2021, 10:11:33 PM by vandermolen »
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5061 on: June 14, 2021, 08:24:54 AM »
Previn's performance is the best I think. Christo likes the Three Portraits as well.
I forgot to mention that I do like Elder's 'Job' and 'Songs of Travel'.


Excellent, Jeffrey. I need to listen to that Elder Job and Songs of Travel recording. It’s still in its’ plastic wrap... :-[
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5062 on: June 14, 2021, 10:11:21 AM »
Excellent, Jeffrey. I need to listen to that Elder Job and Songs of Travel recording. It’s still in its’ plastic wrap... :-[
Oh yes, it needs to come out of the plastic wrap John  ;D
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5063 on: June 14, 2021, 10:26:06 AM »
Oh yes, it needs to come out of the plastic wrap John  ;D

In due course, Jeffrey. One of the tests for a good performance of Job for me is the movement Job’s Dream. If Elder doesn’t nail the poetry of this movement, then all hope is lost. :D
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Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5064 on: June 14, 2021, 11:23:22 AM »
Oh yes, it needs to come out of the plastic wrap John  ;D
In due course, Jeffrey. One of the tests for a good performance of Job for me is the movement Job’s Dream. If Elder doesn’t nail the poetry of this movement, then all hope is lost. :D

I must admit, Job is one of my least favorite pieces by him (pardon, not trying to rain on your parade).  I should revisit it.

PD

p.s. If you're interested, my favorite works by him (off the top of my head):  his symphonies (Sorry, but not keen on his "A Sea Symphony"), Lark, Tallis (pardon, but I'm trying to save typing!), ....what else?  I enjoy his Norfolk Rhapsodies.. his Hodie....love the Baker "English Song Anthology"...will have to think further.  English Folk Song Suite..Greensleeves..Dives and Lazarus.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5065 on: June 14, 2021, 11:27:13 AM »
I must admit, Job is one of my least favorite pieces by him (pardon, not trying to rain on your parade).  I should revisit it.

PD

p.s. If you're interested, my favorite works by him (off the top of my head):  his symphonies (Sorry, but not keen on his "A Sea Symphony"), Lark, Tallis (pardon, but I'm trying to save typing!), ....what else?  I enjoy his Norfolk Rhapsodies.. his Hodie....love the Baker "English Song Anthology"...will have to think further.  English Folk Song Suite..Greensleeves..Dives and Lazarus.

No need apologizing, PD. Job isn’t for everyone. I loved it on first-listen I will say. Have you heard Flos campi or Five Mystical Songs? I must count these pieces amongst my favorite RVW.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5066 on: June 14, 2021, 11:32:58 PM »
I must admit, Job is one of my least favorite pieces by him (pardon, not trying to rain on your parade).  I should revisit it.

PD

p.s. If you're interested, my favorite works by him (off the top of my head):  his symphonies (Sorry, but not keen on his "A Sea Symphony"), Lark, Tallis (pardon, but I'm trying to save typing!), ....what else?  I enjoy his Norfolk Rhapsodies.. his Hodie....love the Baker "English Song Anthology"...will have to think further.  English Folk Song Suite..Greensleeves..Dives and Lazarus.
No need to be sorry at all PD. It took me decades to 'get' 'A Sea Symphony'. Dives and Lazarus is one of my favourites as well. I'd also recommend Sancta Civitas, Epithalamion and Dona Nobis Pacem.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5067 on: June 15, 2021, 02:33:50 AM »
No need to be sorry at all PD. It took me decades to 'get' 'A Sea Symphony'. Dives and Lazarus is one of my favourites as well. I'd also recommend Sancta Civitas, Epithalamion and Dona Nobis Pacem.
IMHO Sea Symphony  reflects the wild and even emphatic vitality of Whitman's verses


























 

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5068 on: June 15, 2021, 02:50:45 AM »
No need apologizing, PD. Job isn’t for everyone. I loved it on first-listen I will say. Have you heard Flos campi or Five Mystical Songs? I must count these pieces amongst my favorite RVW.
It's been ages since I've visited Flos Campi to be honest.  I should revisit it.  By the way, in my haste to post works of VW's that I love, I had forgotten that that Janet Baker album that I enjoy also has a number of other English composers on it too! lol  :-[  I do enjoy the two that are on there:  "The Call" from Five Mystical Songs and also there's "Youth and Love" from Songs of Travel which I enjoy.  It's a wonderful album...love the Finzi and a bunch of others on there too.  Do you two know that album?  Here's a photo of it:



Below is the CD that I own of it on Regis:



No need to be sorry at all PD. It took me decades to 'get' 'A Sea Symphony'. Dives and Lazarus is one of my favourites as well. I'd also recommend Sancta Civitas, Epithalamion and Dona Nobis Pacem.

I do very much like his Dona Nobis Pacem but seldom listen to it due to the powerful and solemn message in it.  Forget what my reactions were to Sancta Civitas.  Hadn't heard of Epithalamion before now.

PD
[/quote]
« Last Edit: June 15, 2021, 04:34:34 AM by Pohjolas Daughter »

Online foxandpeng

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5069 on: June 15, 2021, 04:27:40 AM »
IMHO Sea Symphony  reflects the wild and even emphatic vitality of Whitman's verses

I love RVW, and also have a deep appreciation for WW. I am still to fully appreciate them as a unit. The enthusiastic efforts of the soprano in the first movement reminding the listener of 'sea-captains, young or old' and subsequent choral gymnastics has made me wish, at times, that I could be with those 'Pick'd sparingly without noise' to be drowned.

Doubtless my philistinism and limited love for choral music is partly to blame, but I am yet to love all of the nuances of this huge work. The second and final movements have always been more enjoyable to this listener. I hope to have more decades to rectify this.
“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5070 on: June 15, 2021, 04:35:28 AM »
I love RVW, and also have a deep appreciation for WW. I am still to fully appreciate them as a unit. The enthusiastic efforts of the soprano in the first movement reminding the listener of 'sea-captains, young or old' and subsequent choral gymnastics has made me wish, at times, that I could be with those 'Pick'd sparingly without noise' to be drowned.

Doubtless my philistinism and limited love for choral music is partly to blame, but I am yet to love all of the nuances of this huge work. The second and final movements have always been more enjoyable to this listener. I hope to have more decades to rectify this.
I definitely think that the best music is in the final movement.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5071 on: June 15, 2021, 06:04:59 AM »
I definitely think that the best music is in the final movement.

+ 1

This is some outstanding Vaughan Williams, IMHO. But, to be honest, I never had any issues with A Sea Symphony. I actually rather like it. I like all of RVW’s symphonies, it’s just that I love some more than others.
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Offline Irons

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5072 on: June 15, 2021, 06:17:29 AM »
I must admit, Job is one of my least favorite pieces by him (pardon, not trying to rain on your parade).  I should revisit it.

PD

p.s. If you're interested, my favorite works by him (off the top of my head):  his symphonies (Sorry, but not keen on his "A Sea Symphony"), Lark, Tallis (pardon, but I'm trying to save typing!), ....what else?  I enjoy his Norfolk Rhapsodies.. his Hodie....love the Baker "English Song Anthology"...will have to think further.  English Folk Song Suite..Greensleeves..Dives and Lazarus.

I was quite shocked how much our good friend Lee who loves RVW with a passion dislikes "The Lark" PD.

The Janet Baker album you mention is outstanding. Vaughan Williams was the best English composer of songs in my opinion. Also very good is "Songs of Travel" which I believe to be the first recording by John Shirley-Quirk.

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5073 on: June 15, 2021, 06:38:56 AM »
No need to be sorry at all PD. It took me decades to 'get' 'A Sea Symphony'. Dives and Lazarus is one of my favourites as well. I'd also recommend Sancta Civitas, Epithalamion and Dona Nobis Pacem.

A huge +1 to Santa Civitas and Dona Nobis Pacem. Extremely fine works.
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Online foxandpeng

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5074 on: June 17, 2021, 02:30:23 AM »
No need apologizing, PD. Job isn’t for everyone. I loved it on first-listen I will say. Have you heard Flos campi or Five Mystical Songs? I must count these pieces amongst my favorite RVW.

I concur. Quality.

Flos Campi sounds great here. The particular pleasure of this release, for me, is the Household Music. If you like that sort of thing, there is a particularly fine hymn by Vernon Higham, 'I saw a new vision of Jesus', set to the tune of the first piece. As for Dives and Lazarus (not part of this release, obvs), there is something sublime, I think.

Whatever one's take on spiritual things, RVW has an uncommon ability to elevate and beautify. 
« Last Edit: June 17, 2021, 02:32:46 AM by foxandpeng »
“A quiet secluded life in the country, with the possibility of being useful to people ... then work which one hopes may be of some use; then rest, nature, books, music, love for one's neighbour — such is my idea of happiness"

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Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5075 on: June 17, 2021, 05:00:25 AM »
I concur. Quality.

Flos Campi sounds great here. The particular pleasure of this release, for me, is the Household Music. If you like that sort of thing, there is a particularly fine hymn by Vernon Higham, 'I saw a new vision of Jesus', set to the tune of the first piece. As for Dives and Lazarus (not part of this release, obvs), there is something sublime, I think.

Whatever one's take on spiritual things, RVW has an uncommon ability to elevate and beautify.

I’m not too familiar with Household Music. I own the recording you posted (w/ Hickox), so I’ll have to dig it out and give it a listen. Yes, I certainly agree that he had a special gift into turning something that perhaps on its own doesn’t sound like much into something magical and otherworldly.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5076 on: June 17, 2021, 10:47:27 PM »
I concur. Quality.

Flos Campi sounds great here. The particular pleasure of this release, for me, is the Household Music. If you like that sort of thing, there is a particularly fine hymn by Vernon Higham, 'I saw a new vision of Jesus', set to the tune of the first piece. As for Dives and Lazarus (not part of this release, obvs), there is something sublime, I think.

Whatever one's take on spiritual things, RVW has an uncommon ability to elevate and beautify.
That's a fine CD - also for 'Riders to the Sea' - one of the few operas that I enjoy.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5077 on: June 18, 2021, 04:25:13 AM »
I was quite shocked how much our good friend Lee who loves RVW with a passion dislikes "The Lark" PD.

The Janet Baker album you mention is outstanding. Vaughan Williams was the best English composer of songs in my opinion. Also very good is "Songs of Travel" which I believe to be the first recording by John Shirley-Quirk.
Good to hear that you also enjoy that Baker album!  I expect that you have the original Saga release?  Out of curiosity, any idea of when it was first released, did they press many copies of it?  I don't know off hand what year it came out and how well known Janet Baker was then (I'm guessing though 'well').  Is it very easy to find decent copies of it at a good price?

And, yes, that John Shirley-Quirk is a very nice one too.  :)  Sadly, they don't say anything about the singer nor the pianist in the liner notes....unless there was something else on either the inner sleeve or there was an insert?  I suspect that I don't have the original inner sleeve.

PD

p.s.  I have both Saga 5211 (stereo) and XID 5211.  Oh, I did notice that on the XID one, that on the back at the top it says "Debut Series No. 4", so it sounds like you're correct about it being his first album.  :)

Offline Irons

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5078 on: June 20, 2021, 11:51:50 PM »
Good to hear that you also enjoy that Baker album!  I expect that you have the original Saga release?  Out of curiosity, any idea of when it was first released, did they press many copies of it?  I don't know off hand what year it came out and how well known Janet Baker was then (I'm guessing though 'well').  Is it very easy to find decent copies of it at a good price?

And, yes, that John Shirley-Quirk is a very nice one too.  :)  Sadly, they don't say anything about the singer nor the pianist in the liner notes....unless there was something else on either the inner sleeve or there was an insert?  I suspect that I don't have the original inner sleeve.

PD

p.s.  I have both Saga 5211 (stereo) and XID 5211.  Oh, I did notice that on the XID one, that on the back at the top it says "Debut Series No. 4", so it sounds like you're correct about it being his first album.  :)

You are right! It does say "Debut Series NO.4". You are much more observant then me! I see that the Shirley-Quirk is XID 5211 and Baker XID 5213. So released at same or similar time?

Do you have "A Pageant of English Song" with Janet Baker and Gerald Moore?

You mention "Youth and Love" being a favourite. It is one of mine too. :)

You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5079 on: June 21, 2021, 02:27:18 AM »
You are right! It does say "Debut Series NO.4". You are much more observant then me! I see that the Shirley-Quirk is XID 5211 and Baker XID 5213. So released at same or similar time?

Do you have "A Pageant of English Song" with Janet Baker and Gerald Moore?

You mention "Youth and Love" being a favourite. It is one of mine too. :)
No, I don't have that album.  As far as LPs go, I only have a few with her singing on them (operas).   I have about a half-dozen CDs (or boxed sets).  It appears (after doing a bit of googling) that I have Side 1 (or most of it?  Trying to find a listing of all of the songs on it) of Pageant as part of my EMI Icon set.  According to a Gramophone excerpt here:  https://www.prestomusic.com/classical/products/7945443--janet-baker-haydn-beethoven-scottish-folk-song-arrangements  Pageant was her first solo album for EMI.  Trying to see whether or not she has her own thread?

PD

EDIT:  p.s.  I found her thread and copied the info there too.
« Last Edit: June 21, 2021, 02:33:21 AM by Pohjolas Daughter »