Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 886677 times)

0 Members and 2 Guests are viewing this topic.

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 62961
  • Anton Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5900 on: August 01, 2022, 10:06:07 AM »
Btw, LKB did you buy that RVW Boult symphony Tower Records/Warner Japanese hybrid SACD set?
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

My "Top 5" Favorite Composers: Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius and Bartók


Offline LKB

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3957
  • Location: USA
  • Currently Listening to:
    something between my ears
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5901 on: August 01, 2022, 10:15:10 AM »
Not as yet, my budget needs to recover from vacation last month, and l have some family birthdays over the next two weeks. But I'm determined to own the set, and soon.  8)
Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen...

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 62961
  • Anton Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5902 on: August 01, 2022, 10:18:40 AM »
Not as yet, my budget needs to recover from vacation last month, and l have some family birthdays over the next two weeks. But I'm determined to own the set, and soon.  8)

Great to read. :)
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

My "Top 5" Favorite Composers: Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius and Bartók


Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24717
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5903 on: August 02, 2022, 11:13:31 PM »
Tonight I'll be singing Dona Nobis Pacem, with a community chorus and accompanied on the piano. Looking forward to it, though the choral results will be far from professional. Hopefully it won't rain, as we're outdoors.
Wonderful! Hope it went well.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Christo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5514
  • ... an opening of those magic casements ...
  • Location: Netherlands
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5904 on: August 02, 2022, 11:36:25 PM »
Tonight I'll be singing Dona Nobis Pacem, with a community chorus and accompanied on the piano. Looking forward to it, though the choral results will be far from professional. Hopefully it won't rain, as we're outdoors.
Dona Nobis Pluviam
… music is not only an 'entertainment’, nor a mere luxury, but a necessity of the spiritual if not of the physical life, an opening of those magic casements through which we can catch a glimpse of that country where ultimate reality will be found.    RVW, 1948

Offline Pohjolas Daughter

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 8789
  • Location: USA
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5905 on: August 03, 2022, 04:38:34 AM »

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4153
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5906 on: August 07, 2022, 07:05:16 PM »
I was recently listening to RVW's highly intriguing late Violin Sonata (1952), in this excellent recording by Hugh Bean and David Parkhouse:



The first two movements represent RVW at his most "modern" and complex - full of irregular rhythms, unpredictable harmonies, and scintillating virtuosity for both instruments. Great stuff - so it comes as a slight disappointment to me that the variation-form third movement returns to a much more "comfortable", traditional modal idiom, but it's still beautiful music nonetheless. Interestingly, the theme is taken directly from the third movement of his early Piano Quintet (which is also a theme-and-variations) from the other end of his illustrious career.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24717
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5907 on: August 07, 2022, 09:21:29 PM »
I was recently listening to RVW's highly intriguing late Violin Sonata (1952), in this excellent recording by Hugh Bean and David Parkhouse:



The first two movements represent RVW at his most "modern" and complex - full of irregular rhythms, unpredictable harmonies, and scintillating virtuosity for both instruments. Great stuff - so it comes as a slight disappointment to me that the variation-form third movement returns to a much more "comfortable", traditional modal idiom, but it's still beautiful music nonetheless. Interestingly, the theme is taken directly from the third movement of his early Piano Quintet (which is also a theme-and-variations) from the other end of his illustrious career.
Interesting review Kyle. It's actually one of my favourite pieces of chamber music and that is easily the best performance. I found the recent (much praised) Jennifer Pike recording to be oddly unidiomatic.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Lisztianwagner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5740
  • Wo die Macht der Worte endet, beginnt die Musik.
  • Location: Italy
  • Currently Listening to:
    Classical Music; Wagner, Liszt, Mahler, Beethoven, Rachmaninov, J. Strauss, Tchaikovsky, R.Strauss, Ravel, Sibelius, Chopin, Holst, Prokofiev, Debussy, Shostakovich, Nielsen, Dvořák, Schönberg and Zemlinsky. And many more......
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5908 on: August 07, 2022, 10:13:30 PM »
I was recently listening to RVW's highly intriguing late Violin Sonata (1952), in this excellent recording by Hugh Bean and David Parkhouse:



The first two movements represent RVW at his most "modern" and complex - full of irregular rhythms, unpredictable harmonies, and scintillating virtuosity for both instruments. Great stuff - so it comes as a slight disappointment to me that the variation-form third movement returns to a much more "comfortable", traditional modal idiom, but it's still beautiful music nonetheless. Interestingly, the theme is taken directly from the third movement of his early Piano Quintet (which is also a theme-and-variations) from the other end of his illustrious career.

Sounds an interesting work! I don't know RVW's Violin Sonata, I may listen to it if I find a good recording on youtube or spotify.
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24717
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5909 on: Today at 12:08:18 AM »
Sounds an interesting work! I don't know RVW's Violin Sonata, I may listen to it if I find a good recording on youtube or spotify.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1yIyVwfBAQ0
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Lisztianwagner

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 5740
  • Wo die Macht der Worte endet, beginnt die Musik.
  • Location: Italy
  • Currently Listening to:
    Classical Music; Wagner, Liszt, Mahler, Beethoven, Rachmaninov, J. Strauss, Tchaikovsky, R.Strauss, Ravel, Sibelius, Chopin, Holst, Prokofiev, Debussy, Shostakovich, Nielsen, Dvořák, Schönberg and Zemlinsky. And many more......
"Tradition is not the worship of ashes, but the preservation of fire." - Gustav Mahler