Vaughan Williams's Veranda

Started by karlhenning, April 12, 2007, 06:03:44 AM

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vandermolen

Quote from: Pohjolas Daughter on November 20, 2022, 04:40:30 AM
At a charity shop, I found a LP of Karajan conducting a Sibelius symphony.  In short, the LP wasn't from the same era/pressing as the sleeve.  I've learned also to double-check whether the LP is mono or stereo.

PD

p.s.  Vaughan Williams sounds like a nice way to "start" my morning; I did already listen to some music from a baroque music program.  Must admit, I'm appreciating the tiny bit of extra heat generated by my tube equipment!  ::)
Well PD - at least it was the same composer (Sibelius)! They managed to find the right LP when I got back to the shop. I'm enjoying VW conducting DNP again this morning. :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: vandermolen on November 21, 2022, 01:14:18 AM
Well PD - at least it was the same composer (Sibelius)! They managed to find the right LP when I got back to the shop. I'm enjoying VW conducting DNP again this morning. :)
Oh, good!

Actually, I've just had another look at the LP and sleeve and have a question; I'll post it under the vinyl thread however.

PD

vandermolen

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Irons

More from Somm.

Vaughan Williams String Quartets 1 & 2.
Holst: Phantasy Quartet.

Recorded earlier this year and a nice touch, released on RVW's 150th anniversary.

 http://landofllostcontent.blogspot.com/2022/11/ralph-vaughan-williams-and-gustav-holst.html
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

vandermolen

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

vandermolen

I'd recommend this new release which I've played through several times since returning home from work this evening to find it in the post box. The highlight for me is the new recording of the Fantasia on the Old 104th but, actually I've enjoyed every work on the CD. I could have done without another recording of The Lark Ascending but this is the version for violin and piano which I prefer. The early Piano Quintet is another highlight as is the eloquent Romance for Violin and Piano.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

vandermolen

Strongly recommended even if you own other versions of the Five Mystical Songs:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Abdel Ove Allhan

I posted this on another forum on RVW's B-Day.
Have been revisiting his Piano Concerto in C lately. I was previously familiar with the older 2 piano version which seemed a little unwieldy in that arrangement but now I have the Ashley Wass performance with the Liverpool Phil. and have thoroughly reignited my passion for RVW's masterpiece. Apparently Bartok loved the Toccata1st movement. It is suitably bravura and a bold sonic barrage that would have the hipsters clutching their pork pie hats. The second movement is sumptuously romantic night music with quietly sweeping piano arpeggios and hints of the Fuga theme sprinkled liberally about which then leads to an even more beautiful and transcendent melody that would melt a dodecaphonists face. The Fuga Chromatica con Finale Alla Tedesco is a romp. Inversions, retrogrades, canons abound in this free form but still tonal and "fugal-y" relevant fugue form. The Finale alla tedesco carries over the Fuga theme and developes it further into a demonic waltz/cadenza and after a lovely recapitulation of the Night/Transcendant music the orchestra and piano swell to a full and radiant mp C chord and evaporate into the cool evening.
HBD, RVW,
Music is the most essential yet practically useless endeavor in the entirety of human existence.Yet without music our existence would be comparable to the world of insects."The man that hath no music in himself Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils, Let no such man be trusted."W. Shakespeare

vandermolen

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Albion

Quote from: Abdel Ove Allhan on December 26, 2022, 08:40:54 AMI posted this on another forum on RVW's B-Day.
Have been revisiting his Piano Concerto in C lately. I was previously familiar with the older 2 piano version which seemed a little unwieldy in that arrangement but now I have the Ashley Wass performance with the Liverpool Phil. and have thoroughly reignited my passion for RVW's masterpiece. Apparently Bartok loved the Toccata1st movement. It is suitably bravura and a bold sonic barrage that would have the hipsters clutching their pork pie hats. The second movement is sumptuously romantic night music with quietly sweeping piano arpeggios and hints of the Fuga theme sprinkled liberally about which then leads to an even more beautiful and transcendent melody that would melt a dodecaphonists face. The Fuga Chromatica con Finale Alla Tedesco is a romp. Inversions, retrogrades, canons abound in this free form but still tonal and "fugal-y" relevant fugue form. The Finale alla tedesco carries over the Fuga theme and developes it further into a demonic waltz/cadenza and after a lovely recapitulation of the Night/Transcendant music the orchestra and piano swell to a full and radiant mp C chord and evaporate into the cool evening.
HBD, RVW,

The RVW Piano Concerto is magnificent, either in the solo or duet versions: it just works. A great coupling for it is on Lyrita with John Foulds' equally stunning Dynamic Triptych with Howard Shelley and Vernon Handley. Both superb performances (as usual with both artists). Along with the Three Mantras this was one of Foulds' most visionary works and is well worth seeking out (and then supplement it with the Oramo discs on Warner and the Corp discs on Dutton). But returning to the RVW, why does nobody ever play it in concert? Simply because the magnificent symphonies get most of the playing time - when is the last time that you heard the oboe, violin or tuba concertos live? Erm, never. The same can be said of most of the choral works and the operas. In a way there is just too much excellence and concert planners can only get their heads around a limited repertoire. Alright, if you've got a chorus do A Sea Symphony, if you haven't do one of the others or possibly the overture to The Wasps or the orchestral version of Serenade to Music. Over the years I've supplemented the great EMI 30 disc "Collectors Edition" box with virtually everything else that has now been recorded (especially by Dutton, Naxos and Albion) to the point where I can't really envisage that there will be any other significant "recording premieres". Undoubtedly the Piano Concerto would go down a storm - it's virtuosic, tuneful and wonderfully orchestrated. Either version is equally satisfying (the EMI box has both) but it's essential RVW...

:)
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

k a rl h e nn i ng

Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Abdel Ove Allhan

Quote from: Abdel Ove Allhan on December 26, 2022, 08:40:54 AMand after a lovely recapitulation of the Night/Transcendant music the orchestra and piano swell to a full and radiant mp C chord and evaporate into the cool evening.
After referencing Kennedy concerning the Piano Concerto I was baffled that he says the piece ends "...uncompromisingly in G major." when in fact it most assuredly ends in B major. So we both misstepped (though mine was only a 1/2 step).
Music is the most essential yet practically useless endeavor in the entirety of human existence.Yet without music our existence would be comparable to the world of insects."The man that hath no music in himself Is fit for treasons, stratagems, and spoils, Let no such man be trusted."W. Shakespeare

vandermolen

Quote from: Albion on December 26, 2022, 11:27:05 AMThe RVW Piano Concerto is magnificent, either in the solo or duet versions: it just works. A great coupling for it is on Lyrita with John Foulds' equally stunning Dynamic Triptych with Howard Shelley and Vernon Handley. Both superb performances (as usual with both artists). Along with the Three Mantras this was one of Foulds' most visionary works and is well worth seeking out (and then supplement it with the Oramo discs on Warner and the Corp discs on Dutton). But returning to the RVW, why does nobody ever play it in concert? Simply because the magnificent symphonies get most of the playing time - when is the last time that you heard the oboe, violin or tuba concertos live? Erm, never. The same can be said of most of the choral works and the operas. In a way there is just too much excellence and concert planners can only get their heads around a limited repertoire. Alright, if you've got a chorus do A Sea Symphony, if you haven't do one of the others or possibly the overture to The Wasps or the orchestral version of Serenade to Music. Over the years I've supplemented the great EMI 30 disc "Collectors Edition" box with virtually everything else that has now been recorded (especially by Dutton, Naxos and Albion) to the point where I can't really envisage that there will be any other significant "recording premieres". Undoubtedly the Piano Concerto would go down a storm - it's virtuosic, tuneful and wonderfully orchestrated. Either version is equally satisfying (the EMI box has both) but it's essential RVW...

:)
Although I did get to hear Foulds's 'A World Requiem' live! Foulds was a very fine composer, sadly he died young. The Three Mantras, April, Dynamic Triptych and Hellas are favourites.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Irons

Quote from: vandermolen on December 26, 2022, 11:16:33 AMAn interesting review of the earlier Boult symphony cycle:
https://www.enjoythemusic.com/magazine/music/0504/classical/williams.htm

Interesting indeed. Thanks for posting, Jeffrey. A well researched review but I think worth mentioning that the Decca set was produced by the great John Culshaw and sound engineering by the equally great Kenneth Wilkinson. The reviewer mentions the set was recorded 1953-54. I am shocked to discover these unbelievable set of recording dates.

Symphony No.4 2/12/1953

Symphony No.5 3/12/1953

Symphony No.6 15/12 1953

I do not have the recording dates of the other symphonies to hand. The intensity of the sessions at the Kingsway Hall must have been something!   
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

Pohjolas Daughter

Quote from: Irons on December 27, 2022, 02:39:45 AMInteresting indeed. Thanks for posting, Jeffrey. A well researched review but I think worth mentioning that the Decca set was produced by the great John Culshaw and sound engineering by the equally great Kenneth Wilkinson. The reviewer mentions the set was recorded 1953-54. I am shocked to discover these unbelievable set of recording dates.

Symphony No.4 2/12/1953

Symphony No.5 3/12/1953

Symphony No.6 15/12 1953

I do not have the recording dates of the other symphonies to hand. The intensity of the sessions at the Kingsway Hall must have been something!   
Would love to have been a fly on the wall then...er, maybe not a fly because don't they only live like 3 days?  A friend of someone who was allowed to hang around then? 

PD

vandermolen

Quote from: Irons on December 27, 2022, 02:39:45 AMInteresting indeed. Thanks for posting, Jeffrey. A well researched review but I think worth mentioning that the Decca set was produced by the great John Culshaw and sound engineering by the equally great Kenneth Wilkinson. The reviewer mentions the set was recorded 1953-54. I am shocked to discover these unbelievable set of recording dates.

Symphony No.4 2/12/1953

Symphony No.5 3/12/1953

Symphony No.6 15/12 1953

I do not have the recording dates of the other symphonies to hand. The intensity of the sessions at the Kingsway Hall must have been something!   
I see what you mean Lol!
The photo below appears in the Decca box set booklet with the following caption:
'Sir Adrian Boult with Ralph and Ursula Vaughan Williams in Kingsway Hall on 1st January 1954, the last day of the Decca recording sessions for 'A Sea Symphony' and the Sixth Symphony (the score of which is open on the table)'
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

vandermolen

See above post
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Albion

Two fascinating broadcast documentaries on one of the true giants of British music

R.V.W.: a portrait in words, music and memories of Ralph Vaughan Williams by Michael Oliver broadcast in the series Music Weekly on Sunday 6th December 1981

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wdERwMxpWn8

and a recent survey to celebrate his 150th anniversary

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mHMIqVY123s

 :)
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

Irons

Quote from: vandermolen on December 28, 2022, 02:32:16 AMSee above post


Great minds!

After typing my post I thought - Three symphonies recorded in a fortnight and we are still talking and more importantly listening to them 70 years later!
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

Albion

The photo on the cover of "Music & Friends" shows RVW engrossed in his new iphone, which is clearly also attracting the attention of Boult...

 ;D
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)