Author Topic: Vaughan Williams's Veranda  (Read 800607 times)

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DavidW

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5180 on: October 12, 2021, 02:11:33 PM »
I listened to his 8th symphony in celebration


Offline Scion7

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5181 on: October 12, 2021, 02:20:26 PM »


Back when it was possible to "tunnel" in and download these music commentary programs from the colonies.
The Beeb has been quite protective since then.  Natty.
The Germans, who make doctrines out of everything, deal with music learnedly; the Italians, being voluptuous, seek in it lively, though fleeting, sensations; the French, more vain than perceptive, manage to speak of it wittily; and the English pay for it . . . - Stendhal

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5182 on: October 13, 2021, 10:38:21 PM »
I listened to his 8th symphony in celebration


A good choice!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5183 on: October 15, 2021, 06:26:11 AM »
A good choice!

A good choice as far as the symphony goes, but not the performance. ;) I never cared for Manze's RVW. One of the great 8th performances for me Thomson on Chandos. This is the first performance I heard that made this work click for me.

I didn't post anything in the "Listening" thread, but as a celebration for RVW's birthday, I listened to Job, A Masque for Dancing and Flos Campi from these two recordings:



I just want to say that Wordsworth's Job is one of the finest in the catalog, IMHO. I wish he had done a whole symphony cycle! An excellent conductor and The Philharmonia play their hearts out.
« Last Edit: October 15, 2021, 06:29:39 AM by Mirror Image »
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Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5184 on: October 15, 2021, 07:02:24 PM »
Cross-posted from the WAYLT thread:

Vaughan Williams: Suite for Viola and Chamber Orchestra



This is RVW at his most generously open-hearted, warm, and positive. Some movements even have a real sense of "fun" that one doesn't normally associate with the composer. Dare I say it's even one of my very favorite works of his? Violist Timothy Ridout is one of the most remarkable young string players of our generation IMO, and he gives a gorgeous performance here.


Anyone else love this work? It seems to get little mention on this thread, but it's among my favorite works of RVW's. Absolutely heart-warming stuff.
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Offline Biffo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5185 on: October 16, 2021, 01:08:47 AM »
Cross-posted from the WAYLT thread:

Vaughan Williams: Suite for Viola and Chamber Orchestra



This is RVW at his most generously open-hearted, warm, and positive. Some movements even have a real sense of "fun" that one doesn't normally associate with the composer. Dare I say it's even one of my very favorite works of his? Violist Timothy Ridout is one of the most remarkable young string players of our generation IMO, and he gives a gorgeous performance here.


Anyone else love this work? It seems to get little mention on this thread, but it's among my favorite works of RVW's. Absolutely heart-warming stuff.

I do have a recording of the Suite (Bournemouth Sinfonietta/Norman Del Mar/Frederick Riddle viola) but I haven't listened to it very often, certainly not as much as Flos Campi .

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5186 on: October 16, 2021, 05:55:12 AM »
I do have a recording of the Suite (Bournemouth Sinfonietta/Norman Del Mar/Frederick Riddle viola) but I haven't listened to it very often, certainly not as much as Flos Campi .
I think that Flos Campi is the much greater work.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5187 on: October 16, 2021, 05:56:41 AM »
A good choice as far as the symphony goes, but not the performance. ;) I never cared for Manze's RVW. One of the great 8th performances for me Thomson on Chandos. This is the first performance I heard that made this work click for me.

I didn't post anything in the "Listening" thread, but as a celebration for RVW's birthday, I listened to Job, A Masque for Dancing and Flos Campi from these two recordings:



I just want to say that Wordsworth's Job is one of the finest in the catalog, IMHO. I wish he had done a whole symphony cycle! An excellent conductor and The Philharmonia play their hearts out.
I agree with you about Manze, Thomson and Wordsworth.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5188 on: October 16, 2021, 06:23:58 AM »
I agree with you about Manze, Thomson and Wordsworth.

I somehow knew you'd agree, Jeffrey. ;)

I think that Flos Campi is the much greater work.

I agree with this for sure as Flos Campi is amongst the composer's masterpieces. I do like the Suite for Viola and Chamber Orchestra, though. It doesn't strike me as one of his finest works, but it is enjoyable nevertheless.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5189 on: October 16, 2021, 08:23:40 AM »
I somehow knew you'd agree, Jeffrey. ;)

I agree with this for sure as Flos Campi is amongst the composer's masterpieces. I do like the Suite for Viola and Chamber Orchestra, though. It doesn't strike me as one of his finest works, but it is enjoyable nevertheless.

I haven't really liked the Suite for Viola since I first encountered it on LP. It's one of the few works by VW which I dislike, along with the Wasps Overture and (:o) the 'Serenade to Music'.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5190 on: October 16, 2021, 08:43:02 AM »
I haven't really liked the Suite for Viola since I first encountered it on LP. It's one of the few works by VW which I dislike, along with the Wasps Overture and (:o) the 'Serenade to Music'.

Interesting.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
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His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5191 on: October 17, 2021, 07:00:37 AM »
I haven't really liked the Suite for Viola since I first encountered it on LP. It's one of the few works by VW which I dislike, along with the Wasps Overture and (:o) the 'Serenade to Music'.

I'm with you on the Wasps Overture and Serenade to Music, but what is it specifically that you don't like about the Suite for Viola and Small Orchestra? As with many of my favorite composers, there are always works I don't enjoy that much and I'm just being honest here when I say I can live without the RVW operas. I've heard The Pilgrim's Progress, The Poisoned Kiss and Sir John in Love and the found them overall to be not to my tastes and overlong, although I do like Riders to the Sea, which is darkly moving, but also a good length.
« Last Edit: October 17, 2021, 07:28:35 AM by Mirror Image »
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline kyjo

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5192 on: October 17, 2021, 08:13:17 AM »
I haven't really liked the Suite for Viola since I first encountered it on LP. It's one of the few works by VW which I dislike, along with the Wasps Overture and (:o) the 'Serenade to Music'.

Well, we must agree to disagree here, Jeffrey! ;) The Suite for Viola may not be one of RVW’s most “profound” works, but none the worse for that IMO. I really must revisit Flos campi at some point. I remember it being rather elusive, but, as always with RVW, hauntingly beautiful.
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5193 on: October 17, 2021, 02:05:59 PM »
I'm with you on the Wasps Overture and Serenade to Music, but what is it specifically that you don't like about the Suite for Viola and Small Orchestra? As with many of my favorite composers, there are always works I don't enjoy that much and I'm just being honest here when I say I can live without the RVW operas. I've heard The Pilgrim's Progress, The Poisoned Kiss and Sir John in Love and the found them overall to be not to my tastes and overlong, although I do like Riders to the Sea, which is darkly moving, but also a good length.
The Viola Suite just didn't appeal to me John when I first heard it on LP. Maybe I should give it another listen to. However, I think that the Pilgrim's Progress is arguably his greatest work, although it helps a lot having seen it live in a semi-staged and fully-staged production in London - I found it incredibly moving. I've also been fortunate to see a semi-staged production of 'Riders to the Sea' which I think is another very moving and powerful work. I can, however, easily live without 'Sir John in Love' 'The Poisoned Kiss' and 'Hugh the Drover' which has too much of 'Merrie England' about it.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5194 on: October 17, 2021, 02:07:17 PM »
Well, we must agree to disagree here, Jeffrey! ;) The Suite for Viola may not be one of RVW’s most “profound” works, but none the worse for that IMO. I really must revisit Flos campi at some point. I remember it being rather elusive, but, as always with RVW, hauntingly beautiful.
I must have another listen to the Viola Suite Kyle.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5195 on: October 17, 2021, 07:35:13 PM »
The Viola Suite just didn't appeal to me John when I first heard it on LP. Maybe I should give it another listen to. However, I think that the Pilgrim's Progress is arguably his greatest work, although it helps a lot having seen it live in a semi-staged and fully-staged production in London - I found it incredibly moving. I've also been fortunate to see a semi-staged production of 'Riders to the Sea' which I think is another very moving and powerful work. I can, however, easily live without 'Sir John in Love' 'The Poisoned Kiss' and 'Hugh the Drover' which has too much of 'Merrie England' about it.

You're fortunate to have seen The Pilgrim's Progress in a live context. I'm sure I might even appreciate it more. I'll have to give another listen to the Boult recording I have (I also own Hickox's recording on Chandos). Yes, we're certainly in agreement about Riders to the Sea. A magnificent work! Right now, I'm in the midst of an RVW-a-thon. Listening to Partita for Double String Orchestra --- a work that doesn't get discussed enough!

"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5196 on: October 17, 2021, 11:12:02 PM »
You're fortunate to have seen The Pilgrim's Progress in a live context. I'm sure I might even appreciate it more. I'll have to give another listen to the Boult recording I have (I also own Hickox's recording on Chandos). Yes, we're certainly in agreement about Riders to the Sea. A magnificent work! Right now, I'm in the midst of an RVW-a-thon. Listening to Partita for Double String Orchestra --- a work that doesn't get discussed enough!
I agree John re. the Partita. It's included on the CD with Thomson's excellent recording of the 8th Symphony and I tend to play that CD right through from beginning to end. I actually have three recordings of 'Pilgrim's Progress'. My favourite is the Hickox (I saw him conduct the work) so, I'd recommend giving that version a listen to.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5197 on: October 18, 2021, 06:41:44 AM »
I agree John re. the Partita. It's included on the CD with Thomson's excellent recording of the 8th Symphony and I tend to play that CD right through from beginning to end. I actually have three recordings of 'Pilgrim's Progress'. My favourite is the Hickox (I saw him conduct the work) so, I'd recommend giving that version a listen to.

Ah, yes. You see I bought the Thomson series as box sets. These two to be exact:





I was going to ask you, do you own the Boult Warner box set released from several years ago? I know you own a lot of Boult's RVW individually, but I wasn't sure if you had bought this set:



I had a good many of the Bout recordings individually, but I was thrilled when this box set came out, because it allowed me to own everything he did of the composer on EMI.
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5198 on: October 18, 2021, 07:25:07 AM »
Ah, yes. You see I bought the Thomson series as box sets. These two to be exact:





I was going to ask you, do you own the Boult Warner box set released from several years ago? I know you own a lot of Boult's RVW individually, but I wasn't sure if you had bought this set:



I had a good many of the Bout recordings individually, but I was thrilled when this box set came out, because it allowed me to own everything he did of the composer on EMI.
Yes John - I own all three of those boxed sets as well as the individual CD releases  ::)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Vaughan Williams's Veranda
« Reply #5199 on: October 18, 2021, 07:28:19 AM »
Yes John - I own all three of those boxed sets as well as the individual CD releases  ::)

I knew I could count on you for collection lunacy, which is also a condition I suffer from. :P
"When a man is in despair, it means that he still believes in something." - Dmitri Shostakovich