Author Topic: Mark-Anthony Turnage (1960 -)  (Read 3960 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline Archaic Torso of Apollo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 3372
  • Location: Chicagoland
Re: Mark-Anthony Turnage (1960 -)
« Reply #20 on: February 25, 2014, 07:18:00 PM »
Cool, Velimir. Speranza is the only Turnage work I can say with certainty that I enjoy.

Cool, so far we agree  :) However, since I wrote that, I've had bits of the violin concerto (called Mambo, Blues and Tarantella) going through my head after a second listen. I take that as a positive response.
formerly VELIMIR (before that, Spitvalve)

"Who knows not strict counterpoint, lives and dies an ignoramus" - CPE Bach

Ken B

  • Guest
Re: Mark-Anthony Turnage (1960 -)
« Reply #21 on: February 26, 2014, 07:01:45 AM »
Cool, Velimir. Speranza is the only Turnage work I can say with certainty that I enjoy. The music from him I've heard didn't leave much of a impression.
I have some Decca stuff from the 90s and the Rattle. There's no there there. Just eclecticism and a bit of colour. Not my thing. But there's worse music. I can see liking him.

Online Herman

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2071
  • there's something wrong with my brain
Re: Mark-Anthony Turnage (1960 -)
« Reply #22 on: May 21, 2020, 09:54:10 AM »
By chance I saw a re-broadcast of the 2017 premiere of Turnage's 'Remembering', a four mvt symphony piece written for the son of guitarist John Scofield, the son having died at age 26.

The LSO was conducted by SSR, and I thought it was a terrific. 

Offline relm1

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1074
  • Location: California
Re: Mark-Anthony Turnage (1960 -)
« Reply #23 on: May 21, 2020, 04:50:30 PM »
By chance I saw a re-broadcast of the 2017 premiere of Turnage's 'Remembering', a four mvt symphony piece written for the son of guitarist John Scofield, the son having died at age 26.

The LSO was conducted by SSR, and I thought it was a terrific.

Thanks for the mention.  I met him at the Cabrillo Festival but forget what work was being performed.  I found it engaging but not particularly memorable (I didn't care to hear it again).  But your post about "Remembering" is intriguing and I hope to hear it.