Author Topic: This music is like placing your feet in the sand by the ocean's edge.  (Read 468 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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The title comes from Steve Reich’s 1968 essay Music as a Gradual Process, though I don’t want this thread to be limited to New York minimalism, or indeed any other minimalism.

So, please comment on your favourite recordings of music which reminds you of one of these things:

1. Pulling back a swing, releasing it, and observing it gradually come to rest.

2 Turning over an hour glass and watching the sand slowly run through the bottom.

3. Placing  your feet in the sand by the ocean's edge and watching, feeling, and listening to the waves gradually bury them
« Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 12:17:49 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Nikolaus Brass was a student of Helmut Lachenmann. His string quartets are well worth a listen. There are elements of repetition and change which feel like the ocean lapping on your feet, though not in all movements. In fact the idea for this thread struck me listening to part of his third quartet here

« Last Edit: July 08, 2020, 01:53:31 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Mandryka

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Music by Aldo Clementi here, I've been listening to the radiant piece called Momento

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/9PhvBLbVYX0" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/9PhvBLbVYX0</a>

Like James Tenney he can seem to be academic, because there aren't any marked changes, everything evolves like in Feldman,  but I think it's only a superficial appearance. Deep down he's deep. Or rather, I'd rather think that than that the emperor wears no clothes. But you have to be ready to enjoy the process.
« Last Edit: July 17, 2020, 12:29:30 AM by Mandryka »
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Mirror Image

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This is post I made on another one of your threads, which I think think applies here as well:

I think Justė Janulytė qualifies here:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/a0Pcydv0MuI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/a0Pcydv0MuI</a>



Justė Janulytė (born 1982 in Vilnius) studied composition at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre (with Bronius Kutavičius and Osvaldas Balakauskas), Milan “Giuseppe Verdi” Conservatoire (Alessandro Solbiati) and in various masterclasses (Luca Francesconi, Helena Tulve etc.).

Janulytė's music has been played in Europe, USA, Canada and Australia, by many Lithuanian performers as well as Teatro La Fenice Symphony (cond. Eliahu Inbal) and Gothenburg Opera Symphony (cond. David Björkman) Orchestras, BBC National Orchestra of Wales (cond. Garry Walker), Polish National Philharmonic Orchestra (cond. Jacek Kaspszyk), Brno Philharmonic (cond. Maciej Tworek) and French Flute Orchestra, Riga Sinfonietta (cond. Normunds Sne), Birmingham Contemporary Music Group, Ensemble Bit20 (Bergen), Orchestrutopica (Lisbon), Estonian Philharmonic (cond. Paul Hillier), Danish Radio chamber (cond. Fredrik Malmberg), Latvian ''Kamer'', French Sequenza 9.3 and Polish „Camerata Silesia“ choirs, Quasar (Montreal), Xasax (Paris) and Flotilla (UK) saxophone quartets, cellists Francesco Dillon (IT), Henri Demarquette (FR), Anton Lukoszevieze (UK), flutist Manuel Zurria (IT) and others. Her works were included in the programmes of the Sydney festival, Schleswig-Holstein festival, Venice Biennale, Holland festival (Amsterdam), Warsaw Autumn (PL, 2011, 2012, 2015), Music Gardens (Warsaw), Huddersfield Contemporary Music Festival (UK, 2008, 2010), SonicA (Glasgow), Maerzmusik (Berlin),  Musica festival (Strasbourg), RomaEuropa, Musikprotokoll im steirischem Herbst (Graz), World New Music Days (2009, 2014), Musicadhoy (Madrid), Vale of Glamorgan Festival in Cardiff (UK), Expositions of New Music, Moravian Autumn (Brno, CZ), Cesis Art Festival (LV, composer in residence 2012), Gaida (Vilnius, 2005, 2007, 2010, 2012, 2015) among others.
Justė Janulytė first came into public view in 2004 when her graduation work White music for 15 strings was awarded as the best chamber piece at the competition organized by the Lithuanian Composers' Union. Furthermore, she has been awarded for the best orchestral work (Textile, 2008), the best chamber work (Elongation of Nights, 2010) and the first prize among 2010 Lithuanian pieces for Sandglasses at the same competition. In 2009 Aquarelle for choir won the 1st prize (in the category of composers under 30) at the International Rostrum of Composers in Paris. Witihin the span of several years her experimental and highly visionary works have earned her international renown and official recognition at home in the form of the Young Artist's Prize awarded by the Lithuanian Ministry of Culture of 2011. On the 18th of December 2013 her concert installation "Sandglasses" was performed at the Flagey Center, Brussels at the closing event of the Lithuanian Presidency of the Council of the EU.

Majority of the works by the author, written for 'monochromatic' ensembles (e.g. 24 flutes, 21 string, 16 voices etc.), represent slow and gradual ''thermodynamic'' metamorphoses of texture, timbre, register, articulation and dynamics. While balancing between the aesthetics of minimalism, spectralism and drone music, Justė Janulytė composes acoustic metaphors of optic ideas (Silence of the Falling Snow, 2006; Pendulums, 2011, Observation of Clouds, 2012 etc.) and researches the visual nature of musical phenomena in the works where sound and image are fused together (Breathing Music for string quartet, electronics and kinetic sculptures, 2007; Eclipses for violin, viola, cello, double bass, live electronics and soundproof glass installation, 2007/Integra, Sandglasses for 4 cellos, electronics and installation of video, lights and tulle, 2010/Réseau Varèse).

Since 2006 Janulytė has been teaching a course on contemporary music language at the Lithuanian Academy of Music and Theatre. In 2011 she was a jury member at the Czech composition competion called NUBERG, organized by the Berg Orchestra in Prague and the guest lecturer at the Nordplus Music Labaratory "Process 2013" in Nida (LT). In 2014 May Janulyte held 3 days composition masterclasses at the Sassari Conservatoire (IT). In 2014 her first portrait double album "Sandglasses" was released by the Lithuanian Music Information and Publishing center, consisting of a DVD with Sandglasses and CD with the most important acoustic works. The composer has also written critics and articles on music. Lives and works in Vilnius and Milan.

https://soundcloud.com/juste-janulyte
“Works of art create rules; rules do not create works of art.” - Claude Debussy

Offline Cato

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On an Ocean by John Frizzell, who is not a "classical composer" per se, as far as I know.  The singer is Lisa Garrard.  We rewatched the movie Henry Poole Is Here, and the song is used quite well at a crucial spot.


<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/5_F0Io6LGIM" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/5_F0Io6LGIM</a>


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Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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Huzzah! A Cato sighting!
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
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[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline k a rl h e nn i ng

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  • Et quid amabo nisi quod ænigma est?
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As I recorded in my blog:

As I worked on Nuhro with its drones, pedal-tones (or pedal-intervals), and unhurried tread, I paid close attention to the pacing, I made a point in the unfolding design of varying both textures, and centers of registral gravity. I labored over it all the more, as the pitch-center is relatively constant through the piece (one of the factors of relative stasis). I wanted the piece to be beautiful, and I was eager that it should in no way be dull.

When at last, I reached the end, and I thought and reconsidered and wondered if it really were done, if there really remained nothing which I ought in good musical conscience to adjust or improve, it was August, and my wife asked me if I did not want to go to the beach. I certainly did. The final stage of composing Nuhro, of weighing the question whether it really were done, was the composer wading out calmly into the surf, and replaying the nascent piece in his inner ear, and feeling a profound harmony between his outer and interior experiences.

It was on the sands of Cape Anne, that I knew I had written what was probably the best music I had made to that point.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Offline Old San Antone

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As I recorded in my blog:

As I worked on Nuhro with its drones, pedal-tones (or pedal-intervals), and unhurried tread, I paid close attention to the pacing, I made a point in the unfolding design of varying both textures, and centers of registral gravity. I labored over it all the more, as the pitch-center is relatively constant through the piece (one of the factors of relative stasis). I wanted the piece to be beautiful, and I was eager that it should in no way be dull.

When at last, I reached the end, and I thought and reconsidered and wondered if it really were done, if there really remained nothing which I ought in good musical conscience to adjust or improve, it was August, and my wife asked me if I did not want to go to the beach. I certainly did. The final stage of composing Nuhro, of weighing the question whether it really were done, was the composer wading out calmly into the surf, and replaying the nascent piece in his inner ear, and feeling a profound harmony between his outer and interior experiences.

It was on the sands of Cape Anne, that I knew I had written what was probably the best music I had made to that point.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>

Wonderful.   8)

Offline vandermolen

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Kabeláč's 'Mystery of Time' came to mind for both 1 and 2.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Mandryka

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Nikolaus Brass was a student of Helmut Lachenmann. His string quartets are well worth a listen. There are elements of repetition and change which feel like the ocean lapping on your feet, though not in all movements. In fact the idea for this thread struck me listening to part of his third quartet here



I'm just posting to say that I've been listening to Brass's 4th quartet. Not process music, though there are elements of that. It's fabulous! Serious and long, but poetic and challenging. He's a composer I intend to explore more.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: This music is like placing your feet in the sand by the ocean's edge.
« Reply #10 on: July 23, 2020, 01:35:57 AM »
As I recorded in my blog:

As I worked on Nuhro with its drones, pedal-tones (or pedal-intervals), and unhurried tread, I paid close attention to the pacing, I made a point in the unfolding design of varying both textures, and centers of registral gravity. I labored over it all the more, as the pitch-center is relatively constant through the piece (one of the factors of relative stasis). I wanted the piece to be beautiful, and I was eager that it should in no way be dull.

When at last, I reached the end, and I thought and reconsidered and wondered if it really were done, if there really remained nothing which I ought in good musical conscience to adjust or improve, it was August, and my wife asked me if I did not want to go to the beach. I certainly did. The final stage of composing Nuhro, of weighing the question whether it really were done, was the composer wading out calmly into the surf, and replaying the nascent piece in his inner ear, and feeling a profound harmony between his outer and interior experiences.

It was on the sands of Cape Anne, that I knew I had written what was probably the best music I had made to that point.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>

Lovely piece of music and a good blog entry. Much appreciated.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline Cato

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Re: This music is like placing your feet in the sand by the ocean's edge.
« Reply #11 on: July 23, 2020, 02:50:08 AM »
As I recorded in my blog:

As I worked on Nuhro with its drones, pedal-tones (or pedal-intervals), and unhurried tread, I paid close attention to the pacing, I made a point in the unfolding design of varying both textures, and centers of registral gravity. I labored over it all the more, as the pitch-center is relatively constant through the piece (one of the factors of relative stasis). I wanted the piece to be beautiful, and I was eager that it should in no way be dull.

When at last, I reached the end, and I thought and reconsidered and wondered if it really were done, if there really remained nothing which I ought in good musical conscience to adjust or improve, it was August, and my wife asked me if I did not want to go to the beach. I certainly did. The final stage of composing Nuhro, of weighing the question whether it really were done, was the composer wading out calmly into the surf, and replaying the nascent piece in his inner ear, and feeling a profound harmony between his outer and interior experiences.

It was on the sands of Cape Anne, that I knew I had written what was probably the best music I had made to that point.

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/r2vn2PB_-9g</a>

Lovely piece of music and a good blog entry. Much appreciated.

Wonderful.   8)


Yes!  Nuhro is one of Karl's best works! 

Why it is not one of America's - and the world's - most heard compositions I have no idea!  We at least have the great joy of knowing the work!
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)