Author Topic: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas  (Read 824523 times)

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Offline Hobby

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4540 on: February 25, 2021, 10:51:12 AM »
I’d be happy if you went for op53 as the Gilels recording of 53, 57 and 81a has long been one of my all time favourite CDs and I could learn about alternatives perhaps.

Offline George

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4541 on: February 25, 2021, 12:18:19 PM »
My favorite Waldstein's:

1. Rudolf Serkin (mono) tied with Josef Hofmann (Casimir recital)
2. Annie Fischer tied with Emil Gilels
3. Horowitz
4. Schnabel
5. Hungerford
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4542 on: February 25, 2021, 01:10:59 PM »
I’d be happy if you went for op53 as the Gilels recording of 53, 57 and 81a has long been one of my all time favourite CDs and I could learn about alternatives perhaps.

This sonata’s first movement really needs the percussive timbres of a proper Beethoven piano, so I suggest Paul Komen. But if you really insist on a modern instrument then Paul Jacobs. Pollini also rather good.
« Last Edit: February 25, 2021, 01:27:15 PM by Mandryka »
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Offline Holden

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4543 on: February 25, 2021, 04:09:11 PM »
My favorite Waldstein's:

1. Rudolf Serkin (mono) tied with Josef Hofmann (Casimir recital)
2. Annie Fischer tied with Emil Gilels
3. Horowitz
4. Schnabel
5. Hungerford

One of my favourite (if not top choice) LvB PS is Op 53.

My top choices are mainly played in a similar manner.

Rudolf Serkin '52
Dubravka Tomsic
Solomon
Bruce Hungerford

So George and I agree on two performers (not surprising as we seem to have similar tastes in certain areas).
Cheers

Holden

Offline amw

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4544 on: February 25, 2021, 04:59:57 PM »
for the Waldstein I would name:

- Martha Argerich (which I hope gets issued someday, if a complete recording can be found)

and secondarily:

- Paul Badura-Skoda [Astrée]
- Michaël Lévinas
- Paul Komen
- Bruce Hungerford

but it has been hard for me to find really memorable recordings of this piece; these are just the ones that have been played most often in my library. (Which also contains: Alexei Lubimov, Friedrich Gulda (Amadeo), Daniel-Ben Pienaar, Ragna Schirmer, Radu Lupu, András Schiff, Stephen Kovacevich, Annie Fischer (EMI), Rudolf Firkušný, György Cziffra, Maria Tipo, Takahiro Sonoda, Russell Sherman, Angela Hewitt, Steven Osborne, Stewart Goodyear, Edwin Fischer, Michael Korstick, Paavali Jumppanen, Friedrich Gulda (Orfeo), Artur Schnabel, Stephan Möller, Kazune Shimizu (Sony), Rudolf Serkin (unspecified date), Yusuke Kikuchi, and probably another 2-3 recordings yet uncatalogued. Some of these have not yet been listened to.)

My issue with recordings is generally that the first movement is taken too slowly—Allegro con brio in 4/4 demanded a tempo of at least 80 to the half note—and the rondo is taken too quickly—Allegretto moderato was for Beethoven a quite slow tempo of maybe about 69 to 84 to the quarter note. An ideal recording would therefore have a first movement (with repeat) of around nine and a half minutes, and a rondo of about eleven minutes. Additionally many pianists overuse the pedal in the first movement, where it should be almost entirely eschewed in favour of a dry and percussive piano sound, while not using it quite enough in the rondo, which is built around long pedals that blur together the harmonies and passing notes. Period instrument recordings are therefore usually preferable.

I don't really have the energy to write up mini-reviews of a bunch of Op. 53 performances but I could put together a rating system of some kind.

Offline Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4545 on: May 04, 2021, 05:25:04 AM »
Ernst Gröschel (18 December 1918 in Nuremberg – 5 May 2000 in Zams, Tirol) was a German pianist. Gröschel studied with Emil von Sauer and others in Vienna. He is regarded as the first pianist who played Mozart and Beethoven completely on historical keyboard instruments. He was a member of the Bamberg Piano Quartet.[1] He left behind a large number of recordings both on vinyl and in the archives of the Bayerischer Rundfunk.[2][3][4]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Gr%C3%B6schel


And here's his Beethoven!

https://soundcloud.com/user-985460328/sets/ernst-groschel-spielt-beethoven-fortepiano

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Offline Cato

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4546 on: May 04, 2021, 05:44:29 AM »
One of my favourite (if not top choice) LvB PS is Op 53.

My top choices are mainly played in a similar manner.

Rudolf Serkin '52
Dubravka Tomsic
Solomon
Bruce Hungerford

So George and I agree on two performers (not surprising as we seem to have similar tastes in certain areas).

For your consideration..


From 1950, Wilhelm Backhaus:

<a href="https://www.youtube.com/v/eSWwn6fNaGI" target="_blank" rel="noopener noreferrer" class="bbc_link bbc_flash_disabled new_win">https://www.youtube.com/v/eSWwn6fNaGI</a>

YouTube offers a 1969 live performance, but it has a great amount of hiss in the background.
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Offline mabuse

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4547 on: May 04, 2021, 10:50:59 AM »
Ernst Gröschel (18 December 1918 in Nuremberg – 5 May 2000 in Zams, Tirol) was a German pianist. Gröschel studied with Emil von Sauer and others in Vienna. He is regarded as the first pianist who played Mozart and Beethoven completely on historical keyboard instruments. He was a member of the Bamberg Piano Quartet.[1] He left behind a large number of recordings both on vinyl and in the archives of the Bayerischer Rundfunk.[2][3][4]


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Gr%C3%B6schel


And here's his Beethoven!

https://soundcloud.com/user-985460328/sets/ernst-groschel-spielt-beethoven-fortepiano

Nice find, Mandryka  :)


(Few more stuff by Ernst Gröschel on YT : https://music.youtube.com/browse/UC6YaieOkcRzbt0tkFMG6xqw )

Offline (: premont :)

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4548 on: May 04, 2021, 11:17:06 AM »
Ernst Gröschel

And here's his Beethoven!

https://soundcloud.com/user-985460328/sets/ernst-groschel-spielt-beethoven-fortepiano

Thanks for sharing this. To me he has always been just a name, and I didn't know, that these recordings existed.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4549 on: May 04, 2021, 11:20:06 AM »
Nice find, Mandryka  :)


(Few more stuff by Ernst Gröschel on YT : https://music.youtube.com/browse/UC6YaieOkcRzbt0tkFMG6xqw )

Yes I think Walter Zimmermann's sound-cloud page is full of treasures.
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Offline Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #4550 on: May 04, 2021, 11:20:56 AM »
Thanks for sharing this. To me he has always been just a name, and I didn't know, that these recordings existed.

I'm looking forward to exploring them -- let's post here with our responses.
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