Author Topic: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas  (Read 741387 times)

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Online (: premont :)

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #940 on: July 03, 2011, 09:21:52 AM »
I think Kempff's stereo cycle on DG is most remarkable for his beautiful sparling tone  f you dramatic, emotional contrasts, or interesting ideas about phrasing and voice leading, or indeed a "vision" , then maybe you will be disappointed.

I do not think that I always want dramatic emotional contrasts in Beethovens piano sonatas. My top six list however is composed in order to cover the most represented different approaches in the greatest versions. BTW I think, that Arrau´s (1960es recording) is the most all round interpretation of these six, being manly, emotional, poetic and rich in contrasts.
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Offline Clever Hans

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #941 on: July 03, 2011, 11:30:34 AM »
I this "take" we discussed complete (or near complete) sets. This is the reason, why Rosen was not mentioned. If we had discussed recordings of the late sonatas, I would have mentioned him fairly early, as I like his authoritative but still unmannered playing very much. In the same way I have also enjoyed his recording of the Art of Fugue.

I see. In my opinion one really has to divide early/middle and late sonatas, because interpretations address or not a fundamental shift in Beethoven's compositional style, though without losing humor. This is why Bruce Hungerford could have been the greatest cycle, Gilels for an expansive view. Solomon I find a little dry.

Paul Lewis is consistent in this regard but too precious.

I prefer Arrau's EMI sonata recordings to his later cycle, where I think he gets too distended and fat in the fingers.

Offline Fred

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #942 on: July 03, 2011, 07:39:51 PM »
Have been listening to Stuart Goodyear storm his way through the hammerklavier.  Excitement plus.  Unbelievable technique.  Haven't listened to the last three yet.

Has anybody heard Peter Takacs complete set on Cambria?  Any comments.

Online Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #943 on: July 03, 2011, 08:01:16 PM »
I prefer Arrau's EMI sonata recordings to his later cycle, where I think he gets too distended and fat in the fingers.

Even in the Waldstein?
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kishnevi

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #944 on: July 05, 2011, 03:38:19 PM »
So I've found out.  Vol. 2 is the scarcest, it seems (Presto out of stock,  Amazon US Marketplace has one copy for sale for approx. $30.   So I just ordered it from MDT, which apparently has it in stock.   Vol. 1, 3,4 and 5 are on my Amazon wishlist for now.




Status report: MDT reported via email today that they and their supplier are out of stock.  So I've cancelled that order and it's back to the drawing board....

Offline George

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #945 on: July 05, 2011, 04:13:25 PM »
Status report: MDT reported via email today that they and their supplier are out of stock.  So I've cancelled that order and it's back to the drawing board....

Why not grab the amazon copy? Or at least a cheap ($6.99) download?

BTW, I find it puzzling that the record companies have not bothered to start selling their music via lossless download. Then people like you could get what they wanted instantly and save the planet at the same time.
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kishnevi

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #946 on: July 05, 2011, 04:25:48 PM »
Why not grab the amazon copy? Or at least a cheap ($6.99) download?

BTW, I find it puzzling that the record companies have not bothered to start selling their music via lossless download. Then people like you could get what they wanted instantly and save the planet at the same time.

I probably will get the Marketplace copy, but I want to make sure MDT cancels the order first.

ETA 6 July 10:30 AM EDT  MDT confirmed the order is cancelled, so I'm ordering the Marketplace copy now in my other browser.  It's coming from Austria, so I may not get it until mid-August.  Patience is a virgin, as they say.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 05:35:19 AM by Jeffrey Smith »

Online Mandryka

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #947 on: July 05, 2011, 08:12:55 PM »
I do not think that I always want dramatic emotional contrasts in Beethovens piano sonatas. My top six list however is composed in order to cover the most represented different approaches in the greatest versions. BTW I think, that Arrau´s (1960es recording) is the most all round interpretation of these six, being manly, emotional, poetic and rich in contrasts.

Have yo heard Kempff's 1936 Beethoven sonatas -- he recorded a handful of late sonatas and they were relesed on CD on Dante.  He plays with really clear voicing, intense inwardness and a really breathtaking pianissimo. Another plays where I noticed he plays Beethoven really well is in the Kreutzer sonata with Kulenkampff -- he somehow manages to be very vigorous and dynamic, yet there's a sense of the music being classical, balanced, proportioned. I'm not sure that makes sense -- but anyway, it's good Beethoven playing.

Nothing has ever grabbed my attention like this from the DG sonatas -- but maybe you could mention somewhere where you think he's particularly successful there.
 

Excellent, I'll have to investigate the Gieseking I think.

I'm hoping some enterprising company reissues the Riefling at some point.  I managed to track down six of the LPs, but I want the whole shebang.



If you do, please do report back. The Op 110 is really very special -- but you know that. You were the person who pointed it out to me!

I've heard a handful of others and I felt they were less inspired as interpretations. But if there are any others with the stature of the Op 110, that would be interesting.

There's a cost to his way with Beethoven -- all the rough edges are ironed out.  For me it's almost too great a cost: you end up with something close to tame. But in that Op 110  he sweeps you forward -- the music proceeds inevitably. And tonally it's ravishing.
« Last Edit: July 06, 2011, 07:12:33 AM by Mandryka »
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Offline Fred

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #948 on: July 07, 2011, 11:15:24 PM »
Nobody has reviewed Buchbinders' latest complete set BUCHBINDER LEGACY.  They're live recordings made during the last few years.  I've only listened to the last two CDs, sons 28 - 32, and think they're stunning.  All of the control and intelligence of his first set but with the spontaneity of a live occasion.  Costs only $42 from Amazon US.  Unbelievable.

Offline Todd

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #949 on: July 08, 2011, 06:07:41 AM »
I've only listened to the last two CDs, sons 28 - 32, and think they're stunning.  All of the control and intelligence of his first set but with the spontaneity of a live occasion.  Unbelievable.



I've only listened to the first two discs, and while I still have a ways to go, I can't say that I find the set as good as you do.  Perhaps he's much better in the late sonatas.
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Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #950 on: July 08, 2011, 08:19:19 AM »
Went ahead and pulled the trigger on this 'un:

A fine choice, Karl. Let us know how you get on with it.
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karlhenning

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #951 on: July 08, 2011, 08:21:01 AM »
Looking forward to it, Dave; still waiting for it to land! : )
 
And, howdy!

Leon

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #952 on: July 08, 2011, 08:27:53 AM »
Looking forward to it, Dave; still waiting for it to land! : )
 
And, howdy!

Wow, that is such in important recording I am a bit surprised that you only now have gotten it.  It is arguably the only complete set anyone would need.  There are others I love, Arrau, Backhaus - but the Kempff is everything that one wants in those works.

Enjoy!
:)

Offline DavidRoss

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #953 on: July 08, 2011, 08:38:15 AM »
It is arguably the only complete set anyone would need. :)
Yes...one of the few with which I would be well-satisfied were it the only recorded cycle I owned (though I slightly prefer the earlier mono set, which strikes me as somewhat more...contemplative).
"Maybe the problem most of you have ... is that you're not listening to Barbirolli." ~Sarge

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Offline Toccata&Fugue

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #954 on: July 08, 2011, 10:42:11 AM »
I have Brendel's complete set and all of the ones that Gilels recorded for DG. Lately I've been buying SACD versions by Michael Kortstick on Oehm and Igor Tchetuev on Caro Mitis. The latter is my favorite--his technique and interpretations are outstanding, as is the recoded sound. Both are in the midst of on-going cycles.


Offline Oldnslow

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #955 on: July 08, 2011, 06:07:35 PM »
Fully concurr on the Igor Tchetuev recordings--I have the first three volumes, and a 4th has been issued (including the Tempest) but not yet available easily in the US. Sensitive playing, and stunningly recorded.  I also just received Buchbinder, and have only listened to the first volume---powerful playing, and it will be interesting to explore the cycle in full. Always interesting to hear a live set, warts and all, without corrections for minor slips, if there are any. Sprung for the Peter Takacs set too, even though I know nothing of the artist , except that he teaches at Oberlin. Since I was very pleased with the Craig Sheppard set, perhaps this new set from another professor will be a find. In any event, listening straight through over a couple of weeks to a new set of Beethoven's 32 sonatas,  one of  the pinnacles of western culture, is always a treat. 

Offline Coopmv

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #956 on: July 08, 2011, 06:47:43 PM »
Nobody has reviewed Buchbinders' latest complete set BUCHBINDER LEGACY.  They're live recordings made during the last few years.  I've only listened to the last two CDs, sons 28 - 32, and think they're stunning.  All of the control and intelligence of his first set but with the spontaneity of a live occasion.  Costs only $42 from Amazon US.  Unbelievable.

I have planned on getting Buchbinder's Beethoven Piano Sonatas as my last set of Beethoven Piano Sonatas since I already have 10 other sets, which are more than adequate IMO.  Unfortunately, his Teldec version is OOP, which may be re-issued down the road.  However, I know nothing about the RCA set ...

Offline Oldnslow

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #957 on: July 08, 2011, 09:16:21 PM »
Buchbinder's new set was recorded live in Dresden in the last year. Interestingly, he's now finishing performing all the sonatas in St. Petersburg. He says he has performed the complete set some 40 times. The only other recordings I have by Buchbinder are his Brahms piano concertos with Harnoncourt, which are superb. 

Offline Coopmv

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #958 on: July 09, 2011, 09:38:02 AM »
Buchbinder's new set was recorded live in Dresden in the last year. Interestingly, he's now finishing performing all the sonatas in St. Petersburg. He says he has performed the complete set some 40 times. The only other recordings I have by Buchbinder are his Brahms piano concertos with Harnoncourt, which are superb.

I have the Complete Haydn Piano Sonatas by Buchbinder on the WarnerClassic (formerly Teldec?) label ...

Online (: premont :)

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Re: Beethoven's Piano Sonatas
« Reply #959 on: July 10, 2011, 03:08:47 AM »
Have yo heard Kempff's 1936 Beethoven sonatas -- he recorded a handful of late sonatas and they were relesed on CD on Dante.  He plays with really clear voicing, intense inwardness and a really breathtaking pianissimo. Another plays where I noticed he plays Beethoven really well is in the Kreutzer sonata with Kulenkampff -- he somehow manages to be very vigorous and dynamic, yet there's a sense of the music being classical, balanced, proportioned. I'm not sure that makes sense -- but anyway, it's good Beethoven playing.

Being too late to get the Dante releases, I do not own many of his prewar Beethoven sonata recordings. Only the sonatas no. 2,4,8,13,14,21,23,24,26, 30 as well as the Kreutzer sonata with Kulenkampff. I do not think the general approach in these recordings differs that much from his later recordings.

Quote from: Mandryka
Nothing has ever grabbed my attention like this from the DG sonatas -- but maybe you could mention somewhere where you think he's particularly successful there.
 

Kempff plays a Steinway grand, but Beethovens sonatas were not written for this instrument and its great dynamic powers, and this is why I find Kempff´s subdued approach relevant. And he displays some distinctive features in Beethovens music, which are (not surprising) the beauty and poetry. For that reason I find him most convincing in slow introvert movements like the slow movements of Sonatas 7 and 29. But since no pianist is able to capture all the different elements of Beethovens music in the one and the same performance, multiple collecting becomes mandatory. And note that I did not say that one of Kempff´s sets is the only one to have. If I was told to select only one set, I would tend to choose Arrau.

In 1965 I attended a Beethoven/Kempff recital (sonatas 18,23,24 and 28). These performances were freer and more rich in contrasts than his recordings, which I had learned to know only a short time beforehand.
It's better to act today than to regret tomorrow.
(Mette Frederiksen)