Author Topic: Modern Russian composers  (Read 14014 times)

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snyprrr

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Re: Modern Russian composers
« Reply #20 on: January 11, 2012, 08:14:18 AM »
Yuri Khanen anyone?

Drasko

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Re: Modern Russian composers
« Reply #21 on: January 11, 2012, 08:23:36 AM »

DieNacht

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Re: Modern Russian composers
« Reply #22 on: January 11, 2012, 08:27:17 AM »
Never heard of him, though I try to keep myself updated. Sounds interesting, judging from the wikipedia article

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yuri_Khanon

The title of one of his mentioned works, ""Five Smallest Orgasms", op.29 (1986) ..."written in response to Scriabin’s "Poem of Ecstasy" and recorded by Olympia sounds ... erm ... very unusual :-X. I don´t know of a similar case of a provocative title. Other titles seem to reflect critical and philosophical thinking in various ways, apparently inspired by Satie.

There seems to be quite a lot on you-t, with Russian spelling, for instance http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2DeBdgNpCe8
There he is spelled "Khanin".
« Last Edit: January 11, 2012, 11:19:24 PM by DieNacht »

snyprrr

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Re: Modern Russian composers
« Reply #23 on: January 11, 2012, 09:31:45 PM »
I'd love to know what you all think of his YT output. I think it's ridiculous and mad! :o ;D

Offline Cato

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Re: Maximilian Steinberg's Passion Week
« Reply #24 on: April 15, 2014, 02:40:21 AM »
A very positive review in the Apr. 15th Wall Street Journal of Maximilian Steinberg's Passion Week:

An excerpt:

Quote
...the opening verses of the alleluia of "Passion Week," intoned in Church Slavonic by one of Cappella's stentorian bass voices, seemed to portend another dose of the ensemble's usual hieratic Byzantine and Russian austerity. But it was immediately and surprisingly soothed by soaring high harmonies from an all-star lineup of sopranos who also sing in choir-crazed Portland's other top choruses and vocal ensembles. In fact, the entire "Passion Week," which lasted about an hour, proved unexpectedly gentle, sometimes even lush, occasionally delicate, graced by intermittent dissonances and touches of counterpoint.

Steinberg mostly chose texts (and wrote appropriate music) that focused less on the dark drama that drives J.S. Bach's Passion settings and instead emphasized enlightenment and exaltation. In the troparion "When the Glorious Disciples," when Judas is "stricken and darkened with the love of money," glowering bass tones overwhelm the ethereal sopranos. Later, at "I shall arise and be glorified," the music suddenly surges from gently consoling to assertive and joyous. Though it requires highly skilled singers (particularly basses and sopranos) familiar with Orthodox idioms, it's easy to imagine parts of "Passion Week" being used in both secular and sacred choral settings.

It might even spark a rediscovery of its composer, who was later overshadowed by his contemporaries. "Part of the joy of this piece is discovering more about Steinberg himself," says Mr. Lingas, who plans a return to St. Petersburg for further study. "He wrote some very fine music, so highly valued by his contemporaries."


See:
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303663604579501311292027666?mg=reno64-wsj
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Offline Cato

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Re: Maximilian Steinberg's Passion Week
« Reply #25 on: April 15, 2014, 05:14:21 AM »
A very positive review in the Apr. 15th Wall Street Journal of Maximilian Steinberg's Passion Week:

An excerpt:


See:
http://online.wsj.com/news/articles/SB10001424052702303663604579501311292027666?mg=reno64-wsj

Amazon has two DGG CD's of the first two symphonies: according to a reviewer the plan to record all of the symphonies was dropped.  They are out-of-print, but are available used.


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)