Author Topic: The Romantics in Period Performances  (Read 259241 times)

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Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #700 on: July 12, 2022, 11:07:16 PM »


Richard Burnett has just died on 8 July, he was 90. Nothing like a death to make me appreciate a life! I’m listening to the violin sonata here.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #701 on: July 12, 2022, 11:23:06 PM »


Richard Burnett has just died on 8 July, he was 90. Nothing like a death to make me appreciate a life! I’m listening to the violin sonata here.
He must have been one of the most devoted conservers of historical instruments. Had you ever seen him perform or been to see his collection?

Offline Mandryka

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #702 on: July 13, 2022, 02:26:42 AM »
He must have been one of the most devoted conservers of historical instruments. Had you ever seen him perform or been to see his collection?

No, never saw him or saw the piano collection. His playing in that Schumann violin sonata is muscular.
Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen

Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #703 on: August 18, 2022, 02:55:58 AM »

I don’t know if this quite belongs here but I was really enjoying this tonight. It’s pre-romantic although the instrument is almost there. So is the music.
« Last Edit: August 18, 2022, 05:38:16 AM by milk »

Offline Florestan

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #704 on: August 18, 2022, 05:36:03 AM »


I just got this. Don't know if it's been mentioned before. Should be good, I reckon.
"In religion, philosophy and morality, obedience; in art and literature, independence." - Ricardo Viñes

Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #705 on: August 18, 2022, 05:40:54 AM »


I just got this. Don't know if it's been mentioned before. Should be good, I reckon.
I like that. People complain about Schroder's intonation, which can be a bit odd-sounding at times. I still like it. Penelope Crawford is great and she plays a wonderful instrument. I also love the music.

Offline Florestan

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #706 on: August 18, 2022, 05:46:08 AM »
I like that. People complain about Schroder's intonation, which can be a bit odd-sounding at times. I still like it. Penelope Crawford is great and she plays a wonderful instrument. I also love the music.

I'm not a HIPster but the repertoire is familiar and of great interest to me, so I decided to give it a try. Will report.
"In religion, philosophy and morality, obedience; in art and literature, independence." - Ricardo Viñes

Offline milk

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #707 on: August 18, 2022, 01:28:36 PM »
I'm not a HIPster but the repertoire is familiar and of great interest to me, so I decided to give it a try. Will report.
Mendelssohn really was a brilliant young man. A genius.

Offline Florestan

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #708 on: August 18, 2022, 01:30:00 PM »
Mendelssohn really was a brilliant young man. A genius.

Yes he was.
"In religion, philosophy and morality, obedience; in art and literature, independence." - Ricardo Viñes

Offline San Antone

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Re: The Romantics in Period Performances
« Reply #709 on: August 19, 2022, 02:41:26 AM »
Yi-heng Yang plays Fanny Mendelssohn, Robert Schumann and Franz Schubert on a Graf piano (2022).




I found out about this recording from a review in Early Music America, a magazine I have subscribed to for years.  Here's an excerpt:

Quote
Most people will likely know these works from modern piano performances. Yang’s instrument is a preserved Graf fortepiano from 1825. Key differences from the modern piano are leather hammers, strings at less tension, and a wooden frame, where there’s no cast-iron plate to hold strings under higher tension. It also has extra pedals, including a so-called moderator pedal—a strip of felt between the hammers and strings which audibly muffles the sound. A superficial impression is that the instrument is underpowered and a little tinny sounding in its middle register (courtesy of the leather hammers), but the ear adjusts quickly and the instrument’s strengths are apparent: a sweet melodic character (attributable to the performer, as well as to the instrument), easy balances and clarity of textures due to the sound’s more rapid decay, plenty of oomph (at least at the close range of a recording), and ability to execute accents and sforzandi without the notes lingering so long as to spoil the effect of a sudden interjection. In the hands of the gifted Yi-heng Yang, the instrument has all sorts of color and nuance, and is fully capable of virtuostic explosions.