Author Topic: Box Blather  (Read 283964 times)

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Offline EigenUser

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #140 on: May 26, 2014, 06:40:25 AM »
Another good reason not to play Stockhausen. Hard to convince a cop you are doing it for enjoyment, not because you're stoned or to bug the nighbours.  :)
Here's a cartoon from none other than the old Stockhausen website:
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

Offline Moonfish

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #141 on: May 26, 2014, 09:29:59 AM »
Here's a cartoon from none other than the old Stockhausen website:


ROFL

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Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #142 on: July 29, 2014, 01:37:33 AM »
the new bernstein 80 CD box looks pretty good, from what I can tell.  this is the Japanese Sony site.  If you have chrome with translate, it does most of the page.

http://www.sonymusicshop.jp/m/item/itemShw.php?site=S&ima=0949&cd=02DE000001330

Some details about the first 52 discs:
 [Disc1] JS Bach: "second BWV.1042 E major Violin Concerto"  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (New York February 16, 1966, Philharmonic Hall) JS Bach: "Violin Concerto in C minor BWV.1060 for oboe and "  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), Harold Gomberg (Ob), the New York Philharmonic     (New York February 7, 1966, Philharmonic Hall) Vivaldi: "Piccolo Concerto in C major RV.443 "  [performance] William Heim (Piccolo), the New York Philharmonic (New York December 15, 1958, St. George Hotel) JS Bach: "Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor BWV.1052"  [performance] Glenn Gould (April 1957 New York, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) (P), Columbia Symphony Orchestra [Disc2] Barber: "Violin Concerto Op.14"  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), New York Phil (New York April 27, 1964, Manhattan Center) Bartok: "Concerto for Orchestra"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic (New York November 30, 1959, St. George Hotel) [Disc3] Bartok: "Piano Concerto No. 2" (New York January 19, 1967, Philharmonic Hall), "Piano Concerto No. 3" (New York January 17, 1967, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] Philippe Entremont ( P), the New York Philharmonic [Disc4] Bartok: "Concerto for percussion and two pianos"  [performance] Arthur Gold, Robert Fitz Dale (P), Saul Goodman (timpani),      Eldenburg Bailey , Walter Rosenberger, Maurice Lang (percussion), the New York Philharmonic     (New York May 14, 1966, Philharmonic Hall) Bartok: "Violin Concerto No. 2"  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), New York Philharmonic (New York January 26, 1958, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc5] Berg: "Violin Concerto" (New York December 6, 1959, Manhattan Center) Bartok: Rhapsody for Orchestra and "Violin No. 1 "(New York April 16, 1962, Manhattan Center), Rhapsody No. 2 for orchestra and "Violin" (New York April 16, 1962, Manhattan Center)  [performance] Isaac Stern ( Vn), the New York Philharmonic [Disc6] Beethoven: "Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op.25"  [performance] Leonard Bernstein (P & conductor), the New York Philharmonic New York October 24, (1960, Manhattan Center ) "Piano Concerto No. 2 in B flat major, Op.19": Beethoven  (P), Columbia Symphony Orchestra [performance] Glenn Gould New York, April 09, (1957, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [DISC 7] Beethoven: "Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor, Op.37 "  [performance] Glenn Gould (New York May 4, 1959, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) (P), Columbia Symphony Orchestra Beethoven: "Piano Concerto No. 4 in G major, Op.58 "  [performance] Glenn Gould (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York March 20, 1961, Manhattan Center) [Disc8] Beethoven: "Piano Concerto No. 3 in C minor Op.37" January 20 (1964 day New York, Manhattan Center), "Piano Concerto No. 5 in E-flat major, Op.73" Emperor "" New York May 1, (1962, Manhattan Center)  [performance] Rudolf Serkin (P), the New York Philharmonic [Disc9] Beethoven: "Violin Concerto in D major, Op.61"  (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (New York April 20, 1959, St. George Hotel) [performance] Isaac Stern JS Bach: Violins in "2 Concerto in D minor for BWV.1043 "  [performance] Yehudi Menuhin (Vn), 7 Isaac Stern (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (Carnegie Hall May 18, 1976) [Disc10] Berlioz: the "Italy Harold Op.16 "  [performance] William rinser (Va), the New York Philharmonic (New York October 23, 1961, Manhattan Center) Chausson: "Poem Op.25" New York (January 6, 1964, Manhattan Center) Ravel: "Tsu~iganu" New York (January 6, 1964, Manhattan Center)  [performance] Gino Francescatti (Vn), the New York Philharmonic [Disc11] Bernstein, speech before a performance (Leonard Byrne Stein (talk)) (Carnegie Hall April 6, 1962 (Live)) Brahms: "Piano Concerto No. 1 in D minor Op.15" (Carnegie Hall April 6, 1962 (Live))  [performance] Glenn Gould (P), the New York Philharmonic (Glenn Gould (talk)) (February 2, 1963) Glenn Gould Interview [Disc12] Brahms: "No. 2 in B flat major, Op.83 Piano Concerto"  [ Performed by Andre Watts (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York January 23, 1968, Philharmonic Hall) [Disc13] Brahms: "Violin Concerto in D major, Op.77" (April 15, New York, 1961) Sibelius : "Violin Concerto in D minor Op.47" (January 15, New York, 1963)  [performance] Gino Francescatti (Vn), the New York Philharmonic [Disc14] Copland: "Piano Concerto"  [performance] Aaron Corp. Land (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York January 13, 1964, Philharmonic Hall) William Schuman: "Concerto Rondo of old England"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic New York 17 & April 19, (1976, 30 Avenue Studio) Colombia William Schuman: "you just cause"  [performance] Harold Gomberg (Ob), the New York Philharmonic New York November 22, (1968, Philharmonic Hall) [Disc15] list: " Piano Concerto No. 1 in E flat major, S.124 "  [performance] Andre Watts (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York February 3, 1963, Philharmonic Hall) Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a Theme of Op.43 "Paganini "  (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York May 2, 1964, Manhattan Center) [performance] Gary Graffmann "Piano Concerto in G major": Ravel  (P & conductor), Columbia Symphony Orchestra [performance] Leonard Bernstein (New York April 7, 1958, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc16] Mozart: "No. 15 in B flat major, K.450 Piano Concerto" (New York May 7, 1956, 30 Columbia Avenue studio), " No. 17 in G major, K.453 Piano Concerto "(New York May 4, 1956, 30 Columbia Avenue Studio)  [performance] Leonard Bernstein (P & conductor), Columbia Symphony Orchestra [Disc17] Mozart: Piano of "two Concerto in E flat major, K.365 for "  [playing] Arthur Gold (P), Robert Fitz Dale (P), the New York Philharmonic     (New York February 17, 1970, Philharmonic Hall) Mozart: "3 major K.242 to Concerto for Piano die "  (P), Robert Fitz Dale (P), Leonard Bernstein (P & conductor), the New York Philharmonic [performance] Arthur Gold       March 21, (1968 New York, Philharmonic Hall) Mozart: "Eine kleine Nachtmusik K.525"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic New York March 12, (1973, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc18] Mozart: "Piano Concerto No. 25 in C major, K.503 ")  [performance] Leonard Bernstein (P & conductor), Israel Philharmonic Tel Aviv 1,5 & November 6, (1974, Mann Auditorium Mendelssohn: "Violin Concerto in E minor Op.64 "  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), Israel Philharmonic (July 1967 Jerusalem, Tel Aviv (Live)) [Disc19] Mendelssohn: "Violin Concerto in E minor, Op.64"  [performance] Pincus Zukaman (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (New York February 6, 1969, Philharmonic Hall) Schumann: "Cello Concerto in A minor, Op.129"  [performance] Leonard Rose (Vc), the New York Philharmonic (1960 10 New York on the 24th month) [Disc20] Nielsen: "Flute Concerto"  [performance] Julius Baker (Fl), the New York Philharmonic 15th New York) February (1966 Nielsen: "Concerto for Clarinet and Orchestra Op.57"  [performance] Stanley Drucker (Cl), the New York Philharmonic (March 21, New York, 1967) Hindemith: "Violin Concerto"  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (April 25, New York, 1964) [Disc21] Rachmaninov: "No. 2 in C minor, Op.18 Piano Concerto"  [performance] Philippe Entremont (P), the New York Philharmonic (February 3, 1960 in Paris) Prokofiev: "No. 2 in G minor, Op.63 Violin Concerto"  [performance] Isaac Stern (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (January 22, New York, 1957) [Disc22] Saint-Saens: "Piano Concerto No. 4 in C minor, Op.44"  [playing] Robert Casadesus (P), New York Phil (October 30, New York, 1961) Saint-Saens: "Rondo in A minor Op.28 Kapurichioso Introduction and"  [play] Gino Francescatti (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (New York 06 January 1964) Debussy: "First Rhapsody for Clarinet and Orchestra"  (Cl), the New York Philharmonic (New York October 16, 1961, Manhattan Center) [performance] Stanley Drucker Debussy: "Rhapsody for Saxophone and Orchestra"  [performance] Shigado-Rusher (Sax), the New York Philharmonic (New York October 16, 1961, Manhattan Center) Faure: "Ballad in F sharp major, Op. Op.19"  [playing] Robert Casadesus (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York October 30, 1962, Manhattan Center) [Disc23] Shostakovich: "Piano Concerto No. 1 Op.35"  [performance] Andre Previn (P), the New York Philharmonic New York April 8, (1962, Manhattan Center) "No. 2 Op.102 Piano Concerto": Shostakovich  (P & conductor), the New York Philharmonic New York 6 days) January (1958 [performance] Leonard Bernstein Poulenc: for piano of "two Concerto in D minor "  [performance] Arthur Gold (P), Robert Fitz Dale (P), the New York Philharmonic      (New York October 23, 1961, Manhattan Center) [Disc24] R. Strauss: "Don Quixote Op .35 "  [performance] loan Munro (Vc), William rinser (Va), Daivu~iddo-Nadine (Vn), the New York Philharmonic      (New York October 24, 1968, Philharmonic Hall) Stravinsky: "Piano Concerto for Wind Instruments with "(1950 edition)  [performance] Seymour Lipkin (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York October 26, 1959, Columbia 30th Street Studio) [Disc25] Tchaikovsky: "Piano Concerto No. 1 B-flat minor, Op.23 "  [performance] Andre Watts (P), the New York Philharmonic (New York March 12, 1973, 30 Columbia Avenue Studio) Rachmaninov: No.2 in C minor Op.18 "Piano Concerto"  [ (New York May 26, 1964, Philharmonic Hall) Performed by Gary Graffmann (P), the New York Philharmonic [Disc26] Tchaikovsky: October "Piano Concerto No. 1 in B flat minor, Op.23" (1961 the 9th New York, Manhattan Center)  [performance] Philippe Entremont (P), the New York Philharmonic Dvorak: New York April 14, "Piano Concerto in G minor Op.33" (1975, Columbia Avenue 30 Studio)  [performance] Justus Franz (P), the New York Philharmonic [Disc27] Vivaldi: "Concerto" The Four Seasons "- Spring" (New York May 13, 1963, Manhattan Center), "Concertos" Four Seasons "- Summer" (1964 1 New York on the 27th month, Manhattan Center), "Concertos" Four Seasons "Autumn" New York, February 11 (1964, Manhattan Center), "Concertos" Four Seasons "-" Winter New York January 27, (1964 , Manhattan Center)  [performance] John Corigliano (Vn), the New York Philharmonic Vivaldi: "Concerto in C major RV.558 for multi-instrument"  [playing] Giovanni Vu~ikari, Carlo de Phillips (mandolin), John -ummah, Robert Morris (flute),      William Vu~akkiano, Nathan play Jar (trumpet), Engelbert Brenner (bus oboe),      Christine Sutavurache, Astrid Vurutsura (harp), John Corigliano (Vn) , Laszlo Varga (Vc),      Leonard Bernstein (harpsichord & conductor), the New York Philharmonic, "Oboe Concerto in D minor RV.454"  [performance] Harold Gomberg (Ob), the New York Philharmonic, "Flute Concerto in C minor RV.441 "  [performance] John ummah (Fl), the New York Philharmonic     (New York December 15, 1958, Brooklyn, St. George Hotel) [Disc28] Tchaikovsky: "Violin Concerto in D major, Op.35"  [performance ] Isaac Stern (Vn), the New York Philharmonic (New York March 5, 1973, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc29] Barber: "Adagio for Strings" New York March 20, (1961, Manhattan Center ) Bartok: "music for Celesta Strings, Percussion and" New York March 20, (1961, Manhattan Center) Ben Haim: "Psalm writer of Israel" Carnegie Hall May 2, (1959)  [performance ] New York Philharmonic [Disc30] Beethoven: "Leonore Overture No. 3 Op.72a" (New York October 24, 1960, Manhattan Center), "Overture Op.124 dedication" New York October 9, (1962 , Philharmonic Hall), "King Stephan Overture Op.117" New York October 4, (1966, Philharmonic Hall), "Fidelio Overture Op.72b" New York 10, (January 31, 1967, Philharmonic Hall), "Egmont Overture Op.84" New York, February 12 (1970, Philharmonic Hall), "Leonore Overture Op.72a" Carnegie Hall May 18 (1976)  [performance] New York Philharmonic harmonic [Disc31] Berlioz: "Benvenuto Cellini Overture" (October 31, New York, 1960), "Carnival Overture of Rome", "Juliet Op.17 (excerpt) Romeo and" New York October 26, (1959, Columbia 30 Avenue studio), "Rakottsu~i March" New York October 26, (1967, 30 Columbia Avenue Studio)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc32] Bernstein: "age of" anxiety Symphony No. 2 "" (New York July 19, 1965, Manhattan Center), "facsimile" (New York August 18, 1963, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] Philippe Entremont (P), the New York Philharmonic [Disc33] Bernstein : "age of" anxiety Symphony No. 2 "" (1949 original version)  (P), New York Philharmonic (New York 27 February 1950), [performance] Lucas Foss percussion "violin, string orchestra, harp and Serenade for "  [playing] Isaac Stern (April 19, New York, 1956) (Vn), Columbia Symphony Orchestra [Disc34] Bernstein: "Candide Overture" New York, September 28 (1960, Manhattan Center ,) "" West Side Story "- Symphonic Dance" New York March 6, (1961, Manhattan Center), "Symphonic Suite from the movie" On the Waterfront, "" New York March 16, (1961, Manhattan Center), "Ballet" Fancy Free, "" New York, June 11 (1963, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc35] Bernstein: "riff Prelude, Fugue and"  [performance] Benny Goodman (Cl), the New York Philharmonic (New York May 6, 1963, Columbia 30th Street Studio), "Dance episode musical one" On The Town "to 3"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic ( New York June 18, 1963, Philharmonic Hall), "Serenade for Violin percussion, string orchestra, harp and"  July 22, (1965 (Vn), the New York Philharmonic [performance] Gino Francescatti New York, Manhattan Center), "Ballet" Fancy Free, ""  [performance] Columbia Symphony Orchestra New York July 13, (1956, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc36] Bernstein: "ballet music" de-back " "  [Playing] New York City Ballet Orchestra (New York June 7, 1974, 30 Columbia Avenue studio) [Disc37] Bizet: "Carmen Suite No. 1", "Carmen Suite No. 2" (1967 5 New York 15, the 20th month, Philharmonic Hall) Bizet: "Woman Suite No. 1 of Arles", "Woman the second suite of Arles" 2 days 25, January-February (1968, New York March 5, Phil Harmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc38] Offenbach: "Happiness in Paris" New York December 16, (1969, Philharmonic Hall), "Orpheus Overture of hell" New York March 21, (1967 , Philharmonic Hall) Suppe: "Beautiful Galatea Overture" New York January 10, (1967, Philharmonic Hall) Erorudo: "Zampa Overture" New York January 21, (1963, Philharmonic Hall) Thomas: " Ramon Overture "(New York January 21, 1963, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc39] Brahms: "Academic Festival Overture, Op.80" (New York October 7, 1963, Manhattan Center) , "Tragic Overture Op.81" (New York May 1, 1964, Manhattan Center), "Serenade No. 2 Op.16" (New York 1, the 17th February 1966, Philharmonic Hall), " Variations Op.56a Theme by Haydn "(New York December 16, 1971, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc40] Britain: An Introduction Orchestra Op.34 for the "youth" (narrated *) New York March 20, (1961, Manhattan Center), "Interlude Op.33a sea of the four" New York March 8, (1973, 30 Columbia Avenue studio), "Passacaglia Op.33b" ( New York March 8, 1973, 30 Columbia Avenue studio), "When gone by" English Folk Song Suite "Op.90" New York April 19, (1976, 30 Columbia Street Studio), Orchestra for the "youth Introduction Op.34 "(without narration) (New York March 20, 1961, Manhattan Center)  (conductor and narration *), the New York Philharmonic [performance] Leonard Bernstein [Disc41] Copland: Spring "Appalachian "(New York October 9, 1961, Manhattan Center), "Rodeo" (New York May 2, 1960, Manhattan Center), "Billy the Kid" October 20, Boston Symphony Hall (1959 ), "Fanfare for the citizen" New York, February 16 (1966, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc42] Copland: "Fanfare for the citizen" (December 15, 1958 New York, St. George Hotel), "connotation's" New York, September 23 (1962, Philharmonic Hall), "ink Scape" New York October 17, (1967, Philharmonic Hall), "El (Unknown March 22, 1951) Salon Mexico "Columbia Symphony Orchestra  [playing] the New York Philharmonic [Disc43] Debussy: the video for "Orchestra" (New York October 27, 1958, St. George Hotel) , "Pavane for a Dead Princess" (New York February 2, 1968, Philharmonic Hall), "ma-mail Roy" (New York 1, the 16th February 1965, Manhattan Center)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc44] Debussy: "sea" (New York October 16, 1961, Manhattan Center), "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" (New York September 28, 1960, Manhattan Center), "Yu-Gi-Oh (New York May 2, 1960, Manhattan Center), " "Nocturne, second song: 1 cloud, the first two songs: Festival" (New York September 28, 1960, Manhattan Center)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc45] Dvorak: "Carnival Overture Op.92" (New York February 1, 1965, Manhattan Center), "Slavonic Dances No. 1, Op.46-1" New York October 7, (1965, Manhattan Center), "Slavonic Dances No. 3 Op.46-3" New York October 7, (1965, Manhattan Center) Smetana: "The Bartered Bride Overture" New York January 28, (1963, Philharmonic Hall), "The Bartered Bride Dances to 3" New York February 1, (1965, Manhattan Center), "The Moldau" New York November 23, (1964, Manhattan Center)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc46] Chabrier: "Rhapsody" Spain ""  [playing] the New York Philharmonic (New York January 21, 1963, 30 Avenue Studio Columbia) Falla: "Koihamajutsushi"  [performance] Marilyn Horne (Ms) , New York Philharmonic, "Celebration Fanfare"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic  (New York November 29, 1976, Columbia Avenue 30 Studio) Falla: "Transient and Dances life - Interlude" February 16 (1965 New York, Manhattan Center), New York November 23, "three-cornered hat Suite No. 1" (1964, Manhattan Center), New York 06 "No. 2, three-cornered hat Suite" (November 1961), "fire festival dance of "(New York February 16, 1965, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc47] Gershwin: "Rhapsody in Blue"  (P & conductor), Columbia Symphony [performance] Leonard Bernstein Dan (New York June 23, 1959, St. George Hotel), "An American in Paris"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic (New York December 21, 1958, St. George Hotel) Gurofe: "Grand Canyon "  [playing] the New York Philharmonic (New York May 20, 1963, Philharmonic Hall) [Disc48] Grieg: "Peer Gynt Suite No. 1", the second suite "Peer Gynt" January 2 (1967, New York 10, the 31st, Philharmonic Hall), "No. 2 Norway Dances", "March of the Trolls Op.54-4" New York October 12, (1965, Manhattan Center) Sibelius: "Sad Waltz" ( New York December 8, 1969, Philharmonic Hall), "Swan of Tuonela" New York March 8, (1973, 30 Columbia Avenue studio), "Finlandia" New York, February 16 (1965, Manhattan Center )  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc49] Hindemith: "Symphonic Metamorphosis on Themes of Weber" January 16, New York (1968), "Concerto Music for Brass and Strings," New York March 13, (1961 ) Honegger: "Pacific 231", "rugby", "idyll of summer" New York October 31, (1962, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc50] Holst: "Planet" (1971 11 New York on the 30th month, Philharmonic Hall) Elgar: New York October 26, "Pomp and Circumstance No. 1" (1967, Philharmonic Hall)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc51] : Ives question no "answer (New York April 17, 1964, Manhattan Center), " "holidays" New England symphony "" 27 May (1963, November 23, 1967, New York January 31, 1967, Manhattan Center )  [performance] New York Philharmonic Ives: "Central Park of Dusk"  [playing] the New York Philharmonic, Seiji Ozawa (Assistant Conductor) New York May 7, (1962, Manhattan Center) Ives: "Gong ladder truck", "Circus Band March"  (New York January 31, 1967, Philharmonic Hall) [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc52] : Mussorgsky (Ravel Edition) "Pictures at an Exhibition" October 14 (1958 New York, St. George Hotel), "Night on Bald Mountain" New York, February 16 (1965, Manhattan Center) Dukas: "The Sorcerer's Apprentice" New York, February 16 (1965, Manhattan Center)  [performance] New York Philharmonic [Disc53] "Peter and the Wolf" (Suite) (New York February 12, 1960, St. George Hotel): Prokofiev Saint-Saens: "Carnival of the Animals"
« Last Edit: July 30, 2014, 06:54:17 AM by Baklavaboy »
It's all good...

Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #143 on: July 29, 2014, 01:41:22 AM »
By the way, I got this today.  We were talking about the Seon box some time ago.  If it's all stuff like this, its going to be an AWESOME box.  This one is Vivarte, and is not new, but was only $18 at my shop, and I love the composers and performers---most of my HIP favorites (Bruggen, Leonhardt, Kuijken, Van Asperen, etc.).

It's all good...

Offline The new erato

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #144 on: July 29, 2014, 02:08:14 AM »
Here's a cartoon from none other than the old Stockhausen website:

They're not playing their Stockhausen recordings, they are performing one of his scores.

Ken B

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #145 on: August 01, 2014, 02:38:32 PM »
We have speculation about which of us here might be The Hurwitzer. Informed speculation places Brian in the lead but it is time for a new theory:Moonfish and I are perhaps the real Hurwitzer.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/markovina-aces-cpe-bach-plus-25-greatest-hits-score/

Ken B

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #146 on: August 01, 2014, 02:53:31 PM »
I snapped this up cheap at Abeille and it came today



It is very handsome, each disc in a sleave with a BW photo from the orchestra's history, but what attracted me was that this was mostly music I have never heard. Which is pretty rare for a big box.

Offline EigenUser

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  • Mahler's 9th - "Deadlifts in the midst of life"
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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #147 on: August 01, 2014, 02:56:14 PM »
They're not playing their Stockhausen recordings, they are performing one of his scores.
No, that is one of his scores.
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

Ken B

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #148 on: August 01, 2014, 03:22:27 PM »

Offline Moonfish

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #149 on: August 01, 2014, 09:58:53 PM »
We have speculation about which of us here might be The Hurwitzer. Informed speculation places Brian in the lead but it is time for a new theory:Moonfish and I are perhaps the real Hurwitzer.
http://www.classicstoday.com/review/markovina-aces-cpe-bach-plus-25-greatest-hits-score/

We have been discovered... !!!   ??? ??? ???
"Every time you spend money you are casting a vote for the kind of world you want...."
Anna Lappé

Offline Brian

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #150 on: August 02, 2014, 07:14:23 PM »
I can understand most of the errors Google Translate made, but this one is special:

[Disc44] Debussy: "sea" (New York October 16, 1961, Manhattan Center), "Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun" (New York September 28, 1960, Manhattan Center), "Yu-Gi-Oh (New York May 2, 1960, Manhattan Center), " "Nocturne, second song: 1 cloud, the first two songs: Festival" (New York September 28, 1960, Manhattan Center)  [performance] New York Philharmonic
;D ;D

Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #151 on: August 02, 2014, 08:25:35 PM »
I can understand most of the errors Google Translate made, but this one is special:
 ;D ;D

  At long last, the mysterious origins of Japanese Manga are revealed.  Who'd have dreamed Bernstein was behind it all. No wonder he is so revered in Japan!
It's all good...

Offline Mookalafalas

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #152 on: August 05, 2014, 05:34:19 AM »
As I've mentioned elsewhere, I've been bitten by the Haydn bug.  In a key way, that is when these boxes can really show their usefulness.  So far I keep the box material together, but now I went through and took out all the Haydn.  It turned out to be a lovely cross-sampling.  Bernstein, Abbado,  Karajan, Klemperer and Szell, but also Bruno Weil's wonderful symphonies, and some trios and quartets in semi-hip style, and some fantastic old 50's versions, too.  It's really nice to have a private "library".  It reminds me of Samuel Johnson's advice to Boswell about self-education.  He recommended NOT to force yourself to read books you thought would be good for you, but instead put together a quality collection of books and then just read whatever appealed to you spontaneously from within your own library.   With all these boxes, I've been doing that, but while I'm exposing myself to a lot of great stuff, I don't feel like I've been building a framework of understanding--schemata, as they say in education.  I've been wandering "like a worm in a cheese", to use a favorite quote. 
    Anyway, as in writing a dissertation, sometimes you can get "breadth through depth". I think I'm just going to dig into Haydn and see if that can help me understand everything else.  To return to Johnson "If you grab the trunk firmly enough, you can shake all the branches".
   About boxes, I actually download a lot of stuff from the net, and if I like it (which I tend to do), then I buy it.  In this case, I bought it and then, out of impatience, downloaded it.   Although I've just scratched the surface,  Moonfish's description of the big Haydn box is, as usual, right on the money.  Almost every part (Piano trios, symphonies, Sonatas, etc) are fantastic. I like the Weil and Hogwood more than the Fischer, generally, but I like Fischer.  Harnoncourt is my favorite of all, I think.  All of these are in cheap-ish boxes, by the way.  If you don't have the Vivarte Weil box, and like fast, super vivid (sonically) recordings, it's wonderful--although without much depth (it can't do everything, of course).  The Harnoncourt has more gravitas--it's hip informed, but still reminds me a bit of Beethoven's first, second, and eighth. Playful and with a wide tonal palette.  The musicians and recording are terrific. The brass sounds wonderful.
   Anyway, sorry to blather on---but I shouldn't be, right, as that is what this thread is for 8)  We should use it more.
It's all good...

Ken B

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #153 on: August 05, 2014, 07:46:29 AM »
As I've mentioned elsewhere, I've been bitten by the Haydn bug.  In a key way, that is when these boxes can really show their usefulness.  So far I keep the box material together, but now I went through and took out all the Haydn.  It turned out to be a lovely cross-sampling.  Bernstein, Abbado,  Karajan, Klemperer and Szell, but also Bruno Weil's wonderful symphonies, and some trios and quartets in semi-hip style, and some fantastic old 50's versions, too.  It's really nice to have a private "library".  It reminds me of Samuel Johnson's advice to Boswell about self-education.  He recommended NOT to force yourself to read books you thought would be good for you, but instead put together a quality collection of books and then just read whatever appealed to you spontaneously from within your own library.   With all these boxes, I've been doing that, but while I'm exposing myself to a lot of great stuff, I don't feel like I've been building a framework of understanding--schemata, as they say in education.  I've been wandering "like a worm in a cheese", to use a favorite quote. 
    Anyway, as in writing a dissertation, sometimes you can get "breadth through depth". I think I'm just going to dig into Haydn and see if that can help me understand everything else.  To return to Johnson "If you grab the trunk firmly enough, you can shake all the branches".
   About boxes, I actually download a lot of stuff from the net, and if I like it (which I tend to do), then I buy it.  In this case, I bought it and then, out of impatience, downloaded it.   Although I've just scratched the surface,  Moonfish's description of the big Haydn box is, as usual, right on the money.  Almost every part (Piano trios, symphonies, Sonatas, etc) are fantastic. I like the Weil and Hogwood more than the Fischer, generally, but I like Fischer.  Harnoncourt is my favorite of all, I think.  All of these are in cheap-ish boxes, by the way.  If you don't have the Vivarte Weil box, and like fast, super vivid (sonically) recordings, it's wonderful--although without much depth (it can't do everything, of course).  The Harnoncourt has more gravitas--it's hip informed, but still reminds me a bit of Beethoven's first, second, and eighth. Playful and with a wide tonal palette.  The musicians and recording are terrific. The brass sounds wonderful.
   Anyway, sorry to blather on---but I shouldn't be, right, as that is what this thread is for 8)  We should use it more.
I have the "little" Brilliant Haydn box -- 40 cds. Almost all very good, with a couple exceptions. That is 50 symphonies, trios, piano sonatas, stray bits. Eventually I got all the symphonies and the quartets. The standard in the big Haydn box is pretty high over all.

Offline Moonfish

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #154 on: August 05, 2014, 09:04:09 AM »
As I've mentioned elsewhere, I've been bitten by the Haydn bug.  In a key way, that is when these boxes can really show their usefulness.  So far I keep the box material together, but now I went through and took out all the Haydn.  It turned out to be a lovely cross-sampling.  Bernstein, Abbado,  Karajan, Klemperer and Szell, but also Bruno Weil's wonderful symphonies, and some trios and quartets in semi-hip style, and some fantastic old 50's versions, too.  It's really nice to have a private "library".  It reminds me of Samuel Johnson's advice to Boswell about self-education.  He recommended NOT to force yourself to read books you thought would be good for you, but instead put together a quality collection of books and then just read whatever appealed to you spontaneously from within your own library.   With all these boxes, I've been doing that, but while I'm exposing myself to a lot of great stuff, I don't feel like I've been building a framework of understanding--schemata, as they say in education.  I've been wandering "like a worm in a cheese", to use a favorite quote. 
    Anyway, as in writing a dissertation, sometimes you can get "breadth through depth". I think I'm just going to dig into Haydn and see if that can help me understand everything else.  To return to Johnson "If you grab the trunk firmly enough, you can shake all the branches".
   About boxes, I actually download a lot of stuff from the net, and if I like it (which I tend to do), then I buy it.  In this case, I bought it and then, out of impatience, downloaded it.   Although I've just scratched the surface,  Moonfish's description of the big Haydn box is, as usual, right on the money.  Almost every part (Piano trios, symphonies, Sonatas, etc) are fantastic. I like the Weil and Hogwood more than the Fischer, generally, but I like Fischer.  Harnoncourt is my favorite of all, I think.  All of these are in cheap-ish boxes, by the way.  If you don't have the Vivarte Weil box, and like fast, super vivid (sonically) recordings, it's wonderful--although without much depth (it can't do everything, of course).  The Harnoncourt has more gravitas--it's hip informed, but still reminds me a bit of Beethoven's first, second, and eighth. Playful and with a wide tonal palette.  The musicians and recording are terrific. The brass sounds wonderful.
   Anyway, sorry to blather on---but I shouldn't be, right, as that is what this thread is for 8)  We should use it more.

A severe case of Haydnitis?   A fever of 101?

I enjoyed reading your quotes from Johnson as the clearly represent a rich and interesting approach to a huge topic/area of music. Hmm, I need to take a further look at the Haydn Harnoncourt flavor......


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Anna Lappé

Offline EigenUser

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #155 on: August 05, 2014, 09:49:05 AM »
A severe case of Haydnitis?   A fever of 101?
*ahem* 104. 107 if you count A, B, and the concertante.

And 108 if you count Jeux :D ;).
Beethoven's Op. 133 -- A fugue so bad that even Beethoven himself called it "Grosse".

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #156 on: August 05, 2014, 10:40:07 AM »
*ahem* 104. 107 if you count A, B, and the concertante.

And 108 if you count Jeux :D ;).

Yeah, but then he would die...   :'( :'(
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Ken B

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #157 on: August 05, 2014, 10:52:10 AM »
Yeah, but then he would die...   :'( :'(
Jeux as the coup de grace. I like it.

DavidW

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #158 on: August 06, 2014, 04:15:37 AM »
I received the Bach cantata set a couple of days ago.  I immediately played the cd with cantata bwv 106 that Ken rec'd.  Ah that's great music!  And what a bargain.  It had been mentioned before, but if anyone else is interested check amazon Germany.

Offline Old Listener

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Re: Box Blather
« Reply #159 on: August 06, 2014, 09:49:16 AM »
As I've mentioned elsewhere, I've been bitten by the Haydn bug.  In a key way, that is when these boxes can really show their usefulness.  So far I keep the box material together, but now I went through and took out all the Haydn.  It turned out to be a lovely cross-sampling.  Bernstein, Abbado,  Karajan, Klemperer and Szell, but also Bruno Weil's wonderful symphonies, and some trios and quartets in semi-hip style, and some fantastic old 50's versions, too.  It's really nice to have a private "library".  It reminds me of Samuel Johnson's advice to Boswell about self-education.  He recommended NOT to force yourself to read books you thought would be good for you, but instead put together a quality collection of books and then just read whatever appealed to you spontaneously from within your own library.   With all these boxes, I've been doing that, but while I'm exposing myself to a lot of great stuff, I don't feel like I've been building a framework of understanding--schemata, as they say in education.  I've been wandering "like a worm in a cheese", to use a favorite quote. 

    Anyway, as in writing a dissertation, sometimes you can get "breadth through depth". I think I'm just going to dig into Haydn and see if that can help me understand everything else. 


I was struck by your remarks about having a private library.  I've been acquiring Haydn recordings to get access to all the recordings with potential merit before they disappear.  I no longer think in terms of the "best" recording of a work but in terms of "what recording do I want to hear today".

Two Haydn box recommendations: the Beaux Arts box of Piano Trios is a fine way to explore the piano trios.  The 2 Bach Guild mp3 Haydn boxes have the Blum recordings of 39, 59, 73, 75, 81 and other symphonies as well as the Woldike recordings of the London symphonies.