Author Topic: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)  (Read 160399 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24772
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #820 on: February 19, 2022, 02:51:16 PM »
Just listening to some Miaskovsky today. Sad to think of tragic events happening in Russia and Ukraine at the moment.  :(
Yes, I totally agree with you. Very disturbing. My daughter worked for MSF in Ukraine and they want her to go back but I hope that she does not.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1823
  • Location: California
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #821 on: February 19, 2022, 05:11:06 PM »
I've performed in concerts for the Ukrainians (I forgot exactly what it was but think it was an Independence Day concert) and they were all so generous and lovely.  The kind of people who have little but give all they have for a visitor.  The concert had ballet, chorus and orchestra, it was such a memorable experience.  They were all so kind and lovely, and proud of their national heritage. I'm heartbroken and wish a positive outcome but fear there won't be. 

Offline vandermolen

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • *
  • Posts: 24772
  • Location: Rotherfield, Sussex, UK
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #822 on: February 20, 2022, 01:46:13 AM »
I've performed in concerts for the Ukrainians (I forgot exactly what it was but think it was an Independence Day concert) and they were all so generous and lovely.  The kind of people who have little but give all they have for a visitor.  The concert had ballet, chorus and orchestra, it was such a memorable experience.  They were all so kind and lovely, and proud of their national heritage. I'm heartbroken and wish a positive outcome but fear there won't be.
Same here - I have very happy memories of my visit to Kyiv a few years ago.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2707
  • Location: Wales
  • Currently Listening to:
    Myaskovsky, Schnittke, Pettersson and others
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #823 on: March 18, 2022, 01:55:31 AM »
I've reached No. 20 in my symphony cycle. It's listed as being in E major although the two outer movements begin in E minor, so I feel like it's more in that key than in the parallel major. Unless the key listed is doing so as a goal rather than a centre. Maybe it should be "Symphony No. 20, striving towards E major"?

Offline relm1

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 1823
  • Location: California
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #824 on: March 18, 2022, 06:46:16 AM »
I've reached No. 20 in my symphony cycle. It's listed as being in E major although the two outer movements begin in E minor, so I feel like it's more in that key than in the parallel major. Unless the key listed is doing so as a goal rather than a center. Maybe it should be "Symphony No. 20, striving towards E major"?

The main theme (rehearsal 6) in the first movement is in E major and symphony ends in E major.  Though it starts in E minor, don't think too much about how it starts.  Sometimes composers set up their home key with a leading tone or dominant harmony so when it lands on the tonic it has a bigger impact.   Additionally, the second theme of the first movement is in g minor which is the relative minor of the dominant key to E major.  These are significant tonal relationships.  Harmonic context also helps explain what key a work is.  What the other significant keys are.  For example, in sonata form, the development section is supposed to be somewhat harmonically ambiguous as it should go as far away from the tonic as possible so when it arrives back at the home key in the recapitulation, it's a big moment...an arrival.  And of course, composers in twentieth century were expanding tonal relationships due to influences from other styles of music.
« Last Edit: March 18, 2022, 06:48:38 AM by relm1 »

Offline Maestro267

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 2707
  • Location: Wales
  • Currently Listening to:
    Myaskovsky, Schnittke, Pettersson and others
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #825 on: March 21, 2022, 12:31:10 AM »
Got to what I think is my favourite in the cycle, No. 25. There's something radiant and cleansing about D flat major.

During the listen I realized that Myaskovsky abandons the four-movement symphony for full orchestra after No. 17. The rest are in either three movements or one. No. 22 could be either. Only No. 19 is in four movements and that is scored for wind band.

Offline kyjo

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 4177
  • Kurt Atterberg (1887-1974)
  • Location: United States
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #826 on: March 23, 2022, 06:59:38 AM »
Got to what I think is my favourite in the cycle, No. 25. There's something radiant and cleansing about D flat major.

During the listen I realized that Myaskovsky abandons the four-movement symphony for full orchestra after No. 17. The rest are in either three movements or one. No. 22 could be either. Only No. 19 is in four movements and that is scored for wind band.

Oh yeah, No. 25 is definitely one of my favorites, due in no small due part to it being written in that luscious key. When the full string section enters after the opening clarinet solo - what a glorious moment that is!
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Offline Roy Bland

  • Full Member
  • *
  • Posts: 766
  • God listens short prayers
  • Location: molise
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #827 on: May 02, 2022, 05:34:28 PM »

Offline Mirror Image

  • Veteran member
  • *
  • Posts: 62957
  • Anton Bruckner (1824 - 1896)
  • Location: Northeast GA, US
Re: Nikolay Miaskovsky (1881-1950)
« Reply #828 on: June 07, 2022, 07:39:05 PM »
Here's a photo just for Jeffrey (Vandermolen):

Myaskovsky with his student Khachaturian in 1933
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

My "Top 5" Favorite Composers: Debussy, Mahler, Strauss, Sibelius and Bartók