sir Malcolm Arnold

Started by Thom, April 12, 2007, 10:28:13 AM

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vandermolen

Quote from: Maestro267 on January 13, 2023, 12:20:55 PMI have it as part of the 10-disc British Symphonic Collection (which includes a disc of Arnold, to keep it on topic for the thread) and the Bostock is my definitive Butterworth 1.
The Arnold disc (recently reissued on Alto) is a very fine one.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Irons

Quote from: Albion on January 13, 2023, 01:58:04 AMIt's a very good alternative to the Chandos recording of Gipps' symphony No.2 and anything by Arthur Butterworth is always a bonus. This was one of the discs that made it into the Membran reissue, but if you can get the original release you get booklet notes!

Quote from: vandermolen on January 13, 2023, 12:10:18 PMYes, it's a fine disc.

Quote from: Maestro267 on January 13, 2023, 12:20:55 PMI have it as part of the 10-disc British Symphonic Collection (which includes a disc of Arnold, to keep it on topic for the thread) and the Bostock is my definitive Butterworth 1.

Many thanks for feedback, appreciated. I have ordered the Classico CD.
You must have a very good opinion of yourself to write a symphony - John Ireland.

I opened the door people rushed through and I was left holding the knob - Bo Diddley.

Albion

#742
Quote from: Irons on January 14, 2023, 12:39:13 AMMany thanks for feedback, appreciated. I have ordered the Classico CD.

It'll be worth it! I collected the discs originally and it was a great series as Bostock covered such diverse repertoire as Cipriani Potter and Frederic Cowen. If you can find it, try to get volume 12 "Elgar and the English Choral Tradition" recorded in Liverpool which includes the orchestral version of Dyson's The Blacksmiths, Brian's Psalm 23 and Bridge's A Prayer.

Quote from: vandermolen on January 13, 2023, 12:23:08 PMThe Arnold disc (recently reissued on Alto) is a very fine one.

A valiant effort to keep the thread on track...

;D
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

Roasted Swan

QuoteIt'll be worth it! I collected the discs originally and it was a great series as Bostock covered such diverse repertoire as Cipriani Potter and Frederic Cowen. If you can find it, try to get volume 12 "Elgar and the English Choral Tradition" recorded in Liverpool which includes the orchestral version of Dyson's The Blacksmiths, Brian's Psalm 23 and Bridge's A Prayer.

A valiant effort to keep the thread on track...

;D

Oh no off topic AGAIN!!!  To the highlighted text - I do like that disc a lot but it contains one of the most curious recording errors I know!  The first solo soprano entry in the very beautiful Howells Sine Nomine is actually sung on the wrong notes - a straight comparison with the only other recording of the work on Naxos reveals the mistake.  Quite how that got past singer, conductor and producer I do not know.....

Albion

#744
Quote from: Roasted Swan on January 14, 2023, 03:02:18 AMOh no off topic AGAIN!!!  To the highlighted text - I do like that disc a lot but it contains one of the most curious recording errors I know!  The first solo soprano entry in the very beautiful Howells Sine Nomine is actually sung on the wrong notes - a straight comparison with the only other recording of the work on Naxos reveals the mistake.  Quite how that got past singer, conductor and producer I do not know.....

Not as great as Dorati's "acclaimed" Concertgebouw "Sleeping Beauty" where in the Act 1 March the cellos misread the tenor clef for the bass clef. Perhaps Dorati had nipped out to the loo. Sample 2:30 in wonderment...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNQWet5Ai64&list=PLClKtfs9ReDfdmonz_V8XglzlQK1F3VST&index=2

... it didn't happen in Minneapolis (perhaps Dorati had a commode)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0apAHC3NROg&list=OLAK5uy_lyLsZrY3_cAC5HOMrewh2pO-fG_FDcg2M&index=2

 ;D
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)

Roasted Swan

Quote from: Albion on January 14, 2023, 06:36:20 AMNot as great as Dorati's "acclaimed" Concertgebouw "Sleeping Beauty" where in the Act 1 March the cellos misread the tenor clef for the bass clef. Perhaps Dorati had nipped out to the loo. Sample 2:30 in wonderment...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zNQWet5Ai64&list=PLClKtfs9ReDfdmonz_V8XglzlQK1F3VST&index=2

... it didn't happen in Minneapolis (perhaps Dorati had a commode)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0apAHC3NROg&list=OLAK5uy_lyLsZrY3_cAC5HOMrewh2pO-fG_FDcg2M&index=2

 ;D

I did know about that one - but it still comes up as a shock!

Carshot

Quote from: relm1 on January 12, 2023, 05:47:32 AMI very much enjoyed this new release from Chandos.  Great sound and performances plus I think some rarities such as Arnold's earliest symphonic poem, The Larch Trees, op. 3.  Philharmonic Concerto, Op.120, is exciting and dramatic work, a concerto for orchestra.



I, too, really enjoy this new release. I bought the CD but on uploading it to my laptop then iPhone the alphabet characters all look Chinese! Mervyn Cooke's excellent booklet notes mention that the "wrong" recurring note (my phrase) during the "The Padstow Lifeboat" represents the sound of the foghorn at the nearby Trevose Head lighthouse. I had not known this and it adds to my enjoyment.

vandermolen

Quote from: Carshot on January 15, 2023, 10:25:24 AMI, too, really enjoy this new release. I bought the CD but on uploading it to my laptop then iPhone the alphabet characters all look Chinese! Mervyn Cooke's excellent booklet notes mention that the "wrong" recurring note (my phrase) during the "The Padstow Lifeboat" represents the sound of the foghorn at the nearby Trevose Head lighthouse. I had not known this and it adds to my enjoyment.
I like that foghorn moment - great fun!
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

kyjo

Quote from: Figaro on August 20, 2022, 12:57:05 PMAnyone with a view on Arnold's Concertos, either collectively or individually? This is a long old thread but has mainly focused on the symphonies, with very little attention on anything else.

Yet he wrote nearly twenty concertos, for a wide range of instruments (curiously no straight up piano or violin concertos, given they're the most common usually). Mark Morris is quite dismissive of them ("pleasant music making") but is very dismissive of Arnold generally - anyone with a dissenting view? The concertos are all quite short which makes me lean towards not expecting any great masterpieces among them, but does anyone have any favourites or recommendations among them?

Bit of a belated response here! I would say that overall, his concerti are a bit of a mixed bag, but the best ones definitely deserve to be heard. The Guitar Concerto is my favorite, with its glorious tune in the first movement and mysterious second movement. Following closely behind is the Concerto for 2 Pianos 3-Hands, which is tremendous fun all-around. Not technically a concerto, but the Fantasy on a Theme of John Field for piano and orchestra is a substantial, tremendously exciting, and phantasmagorical work with passages resembling some of the more nightmarish sections of his symphonies. His Viola Concerto and Clarinet Concerto no. 2 (with its jazzy finale) are also particular favorites. I find the rest of his woodwind concerti (the ones for flute and horn) to be less interesting.
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Roasted Swan

QuoteBit of a belated response here! I would say that overall, his concerti are a bit of a mixed bag, but the best ones definitely deserve to be heard. The Guitar Concerto is my favorite, with its glorious tune in the first movement and mysterious second movement. Following closely behind is the Concerto for 2 Pianos 3-Hands, which is tremendous fun all-around. Not technically a concerto, but the Fantasy on a Theme of John Field for piano and orchestra is a substantial, tremendously exciting, and phantasmagorical work with passages resembling some of the more nightmarish sections of his symphonies. His Viola Concerto and Clarinet Concerto no. 2 (with its jazzy finale) are also particular favorites. I find the rest of his woodwind concerti (the ones for flute and horn) to be less interesting.



I agree with what you say.  But I would add the Clarinet Concerto No.1 on this new disc which I think is the best of Arnold's more serious/non-crowd-pleasing concertos.... the performance here is absolutely top notch

vandermolen

I like the PC (for three hands) and the Guitar Concerto in particular.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

kyjo

Quote from: Roasted Swan on January 16, 2023, 06:36:54 AMI agree with what you say.  But I would add the Clarinet Concerto No.1 on this new disc which I think is the best of Arnold's more serious/non-crowd-pleasing concertos.... the performance here is absolutely top notch

I'll definitely give that new recording a spin! I recall it being a very serious and rather acerbic work (compared to most of his other concerti).
"Music is enough for a lifetime, but a lifetime is not enough for music" - Sergei Rachmaninoff

Albion

Quote from: vandermolen on January 16, 2023, 06:48:59 AMI like the PC (for three hands) and the Guitar Concerto in particular.

Bang on! Add the Concerto for Piano Duet, the Philharmonic Concerto and the Double Violin Concerto and you're in business...

 ;D
A piece is worth your attention, and is itself for you praiseworthy, if it makes you feel you have not wasted your time over it. (SG, 1922)