The GMG Mystery/Suspense/Thriller Club

Started by DavidW, July 06, 2014, 07:09:58 AM

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DavidW

Thought I would follow MN Dave's example.  I'm currently reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly. 

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Boy I wish I had that cover, it is better than the cover art on the paperback that I have.  This is a Harry Bosch novel.  I like it so far, but I swear if the twist is dirty cops I'm flinging it across the room!  That is so cliche that it's just boring.

mn dave

Excellent idea for a thread!

All I have to post for now is: Read Ross MacDonald!

Florestan

One of my favorite authors in the genre is the Spaniard Arturo Perez Reverte.

"Art is no excuse for boring people." - Jules Renard

Ken B

Quote from: Mn Dave on July 06, 2014, 07:12:44 AM
Excellent idea for a thread!

All I have to post for now is: Read Ross MacDonald!
Post 1959
All the later books are great. I pick The Chill, primus inter pares.
And look for dramatized readings starring Harris Yulin. Great stuff.


Gurn Blanston

Quote from: DavidW on July 06, 2014, 07:09:58 AM
Thought I would follow MN Dave's example.  I'm currently reading The Black Ice by Michael Connelly. 



Boy I wish I had that cover, it is better than the cover art on the paperback that I have.  This is a Harry Bosch novel.  I like it so far, but I swear if the twist is dirty cops I'm flinging it across the room!  That is so cliche that it's just boring.

Dude, Michael Connelly is the finest author today. I have every one of the Harry Bosch books and have read them several times each; no worries, it won't be dirty cops. The thing about Bosch is him, he is so noir. The depth of the mystery is one thing, the overall mood is something else again. Just this afternoon I finished rereading the first book in another series by Connelly, The Lincoln Lawyer.

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After you are done with Bosch, try Haller.   :)

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Holden

This is my favourite reading genre! I've read all the Connelly's and have many other preferred authors from both sides of the ditch. I especially like police mysteries and would like to recommend the following authors:

US: John Sandford, Robert B Parker's "Jesse Stone" series and of course the good old "87th Precinct" series from Ed McBain which never seem dated despite some being over 40 years old.

UK: Ian Rankin's "Rebus" novels, Peter Robinson's "Inspector Banks" series

Nordic: Henning Mankel's "Inspector Wallander" series, Camilla Lackberg.

There are many others.
Cheers

Holden

DavidW

Quote from: Gurn Blanston on July 06, 2014, 02:32:45 PM
Dude, Michael Connelly is the finest author today. I have every one of the Harry Bosch books and have read them several times each; no worries, it won't be dirty cops. The thing about Bosch is him, he is so noir. The depth of the mystery is one thing, the overall mood is something else again. Just this afternoon I finished rereading the first book in another series by Connelly, The Lincoln Lawyer.

I think that noir feel is what I liked so much about The Black Echo, and I'm liking it hear as well.  I picked up several more Connelly novels in hardcover at a library book sale.  I remember the person running as cashier said "oh you're buying my Michael Connelly novels, he is just the best writer!" And then the other volunteer said "oh and I see you picked up my Vince Flynn and Brad Thor novels, they are just great."  That was kind of cool. :)

DavidW

Quote from: Holden on July 06, 2014, 03:29:37 PM
This is my favourite reading genre! I've read all the Connelly's and have many other preferred authors from both sides of the ditch. I especially like police mysteries and would like to recommend the following authors:

US: John Sandford, Robert B Parker's "Jesse Stone" series and of course the good old "87th Precinct" series from Ed McBain which never seem dated despite some being over 40 years old.

UK: Ian Rankin's "Rebus" novels, Peter Robinson's "Inspector Banks" series

Nordic: Henning Mankel's "Inspector Wallander" series, Camilla Lackberg.

There are many others.

I'm also a fan of the Rebus novels.  I like the Wallander tv show, and some day I will read the novels.  I'll remember your post for future ideas.

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: DavidW on July 07, 2014, 07:26:25 AM
I think that noir feel is what I liked so much about The Black Echo, and I'm liking it hear as well.  I picked up several more Connelly novels in hardcover at a library book sale.  I remember the person running as cashier said "oh you're buying my Michael Connelly novels, he is just the best writer!" And then the other volunteer said "oh and I see you picked up my Vince Flynn and Brad Thor novels, they are just great."  That was kind of cool. :)

I predict you will be pleased. It behooves you to try to read them in order, but it isn't necessary, just nice. As it happens, I picked up his first novel when it was new, so I have got all of them as they came out. That was nice, I sort of saw his maturation as an author. 

I'm thinking of trying John Lescroart next, never read any of his. My second favorite is John Sandford, got everything he wrote too.

Of course, this all has to do with current authors. I have yet to run across one who surpasses Rex Stout... :)

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Gurn Blanston

Quote from: Mn Dave on July 07, 2014, 07:55:18 AM
Another fine series:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Tony_Hillerman#Bibliography

Absolutely. TH was brilliant, and the Navajo background is fascinating. Another set of books which I wore out... :-\

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k a rl h e nn i ng

Quote from: Gurn Blanston on July 07, 2014, 07:31:10 AM
[...]

Of course, this all has to do with current authors. I have yet to run across one who surpasses Rex Stout... :)

8)

One of these days, I'll read 'em.  My brother put me onto the Timothy Hutton/Maury Chaykin A&E series.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot


Ken B

Quote from: karlhenning on July 07, 2014, 08:32:07 AM
One of these days, I'll read 'em.  My brother put me onto the Timothy Hutton/Maury Chaykin A&E series.
A mixed bag, but some are outstanding.

The best Nero Wolfe books are from the 30s. Rubber Band, Red Box, League of Frightened Men especially.

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: Ken B on July 07, 2014, 09:13:53 AM
A mixed bag, but some are outstanding.

The best Nero Wolfe books are from the 30s. Rubber Band, Red Box, League of Frightened Men especially.

I like all of them. Where the dropoff comes in is after he died and various others tried to keep the series going. Generally they were unsuccessful. Ones from the 1960's were generally excellent as well (The Mother Hunt, for example) as in the '30's. Don't forget from back then, Some Buried Caesar too. :)

Generally speaking, Stout was untouchable, especially in characterization. You could picture Wolfe, Goodwin and Fritz, and even Theodore, in your mind's eye so clearly it was like knowing them. I can't easily think of another author in this genre who could match that.  :)

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Gurn Blanston

Quote from: karlhenning on July 07, 2014, 08:32:07 AM
One of these days, I'll read 'em.  My brother put me onto the Timothy Hutton/Maury Chaykin A&E series.

Of the various screen versions of Wolfe over the years, these were the best. As Ken says, the books were the best. I might just snap up that DVD set though, for fun. :)

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Ken B

For those with a taste for flamboyant and outre puzzles the early Ellery Queen books are great. The Chinese Orange and French Powder Mysteries especially. Weak as novels, great as detection and logic. The best *novel*  is Calamity Town of 1942. The TV series was pretty good. More in feel like the Queen books of the 40s.

k a rl h e nn i ng

Quote from: Gurn Blanston on July 07, 2014, 10:22:58 AM
I like all of them. Where the dropoff comes in is after he died and various others tried to keep the series going. Generally they were unsuccessful. Ones from the 1960's were generally excellent as well (The Mother Hunt, for example) as in the '30's. Don't forget from back then, Some Buried Caesar too. :)

Generally speaking, Stout was untouchable, especially in characterization. You could picture Wolfe, Goodwin and Fritz, and even Theodore, in your mind's eye so clearly it was like knowing them. I can't easily think of another author in this genre who could match that.  :)

8)

My aforementioned beloved brother has by now read the entire Canon (and pseudepigrapha  ;) ) aloud to my equally beloved sister-in-law not once, but twice.  And his doctoral dissertation was on Dickens, so his enthusiasm for Stout is high estimation, indeed.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: Ken B on July 07, 2014, 10:34:48 AM
For those with a taste for flamboyant and outre puzzles the early Ellery Queen books are great. The Chinese Orange and French Powder Mysteries especially. Weak as novels, great as detection and logic. The best *novel*  is Calamity Town of 1942. The TV series was pretty good. More in feel like the Queen books of the 40s.

Absolutely! My very first mystery, and the book that got me into mysteries (when I was 13 years old!) was The French Powder Mystery, which I quickly followed with The Chinese Orange... The Roman Hat... and The Egyptian Cross.... I was desperate to beat the 'challenge to the reader'  :)  I surely read Calamity Town, although it's been almost 50 years, so you'll have to forgive me if I forgot 'whodunnit'!  :)

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