The GMG Mystery/Suspense/Thriller Club

Started by DavidW, July 06, 2014, 07:09:58 AM

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Ken B

Quote from: karlhenning on July 07, 2014, 10:35:29 AM
My aforementioned beloved brother has by now read the entire Canon (and pseudepigrapha  ;) ) aloud to my equally beloved sister-in-law not once, but twice.  And his doctoral dissertation was on Dickens, so his enthusiasm for Stout is high estimation, indeed.
Now I am wondering if you have beloved yet unmentioned brothers, mentioned yet unbeloved brothers, or both.
;D

Stout, especially early on, has wonderful snappy dialog. They bear up under re-reading.

kishnevi

The Gervase Fen stories by Edmund Crispin aka Bruce Montgomery,  who was a musician for his day job.  Best one to read first is probably Moving Toyshop, in which mot merely the corpse but the entire scene of the crime disappears.

DavidW

I've finished The Black Ice, and man do I feel dumb.  I just did not see that twist coming.  Great novel.

Gurn Blanston

Quote from: DavidW on July 08, 2014, 06:12:52 AM
I've finished The Black Ice, and man do I feel dumb.  I just did not see that twist coming.  Great novel.

Yeah, that's why I laughed when you ventured a guess. Connelly is just that good. Maybe The Concrete Blonde next? :)

8)
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Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)

DavidW

Quote from: Gurn Blanston on July 08, 2014, 06:21:07 AM
Yeah, that's why I laughed when you ventured a guess. Connelly is just that good. Maybe The Concrete Blonde next? :)

8)

Yes the Concrete Blonde is in a to read pile right behind me on my bookshelf.

DavidW

I'm reading Pursuit of Honor by Vince Flynn.  I think that it is a bad sign when I disagree with the protagonist, and sympathize with the guy they've kidnapped.  They keep saying "you just don't get it..." well guess what?  I, the reader, don't either.  Maybe you could explain it?  I wonder if it's meant to be satirical?  I can't help but notice that one of the terrorists acts in a similarly closed minded fashion, killing people that could have been left alone.  The interrogation and murdering of hunters are happening at the same time.  I'm going to give Flynn the benefit of the doubt, and say that he is depicting these men of violence and not saying that there is necessarily any ethical right for them to be above the law.

Anyway the story is about terrorists attack DC, and CIA spook Mitch Rapp is hunting them down.  Simple enough story, what I didn't realize is that this is really part 2 of a story started in a previous novel.  But you know what?  I don't care.  You could write the plot on the back of an envelope.  The point as always is to see Mitch Rapp kick ass and chew bubblegum, and he's all out of bubblegum!

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Gurn Blanston

Quote from: DavidW on July 14, 2014, 07:13:27 AM
I'm reading Pursuit of Honor by Vince Flynn.  I think that it is a bad sign when I disagree with the protagonist, and sympathize with the guy they've kidnapped.  They keep saying "you just don't get it..." well guess what?  I, the reader, don't either.  Maybe you could explain it?  I wonder if it's meant to be satirical?  I can't help but notice that one of the terrorists acts in a similarly closed minded fashion, killing people that could have been left alone.  The interrogation and murdering of hunters are happening at the same time.  I'm going to give Flynn the benefit of the doubt, and say that he is depicting these men of violence and not saying that there is necessarily any ethical right for them to be above the law.

Anyway the story is about terrorists attack DC, and CIA spook Mitch Rapp is hunting them down.  Simple enough story, what I didn't realize is that this is really part 2 of a story started in a previous novel.  But you know what?  I don't care.  You could write the plot on the back of an envelope.  The point as always is to see Mitch Rapp kick ass and chew bubblegum, and he's all out of bubblegum!

I have always avoided Vince Flynn, somehow the selling points of the books eluded me but I didn't know why exactly. And now I do. You should try John Sandford instead. If you go with the Davenport books, start at the beginning, like 'Eyes of Prey'. His first 10 are the best!

8)
Visit my Haydn blog: HaydnSeek

Haydn: that genius of vulgar music who induces an inordinate thirst for beer - Mily Balakirev (1860)

DavidW

The first two Flynn novels that I read are awesome.  One has terrorists taking the White House.  Rapp goes in covertly through a tunnel and into the White House... and collects intelligence.  It is slow paced and detail orientated, but very exciting.  It is like early Clancy.

I read another which was the opposite, it surprisingly kind of predicts the Benghazi incident.  The other novel was Rapp as a young man, and this one is Rapp at the end of his career.  It is the opposite character.  He is a Chuck Norris type character, so over the top it is like 80s action movies cheese.

This novel kind of reveals to me 24's preoccupation with interrogation.  I might be selling it short due to not having read the preceding novel, I am going to put it down and read the one that comes before it first.  But yeah later...

And I'll check out John Sanford, but I want to finish the Bourne trilogy first.  Supremacy and Ultimatum have been sitting on my to read pile for two years!  Which is stupid.  It has been three or four years since I read the Bourne Identity.

Ken B

I see no-one has mentioned the Sjowall/Wahloo books with Martin Beck yet. One of the great series, set in Sweden.

DavidW

I've been watching Longmire on Netflix watch instantly.  Really liking the show, good mysteries and characters.  None of that csi stupidity, and not a meandering soap either.  Just perfect.  At least for now.  I'm half way through the first season.



Anyone else watch the show?

Bogey

Quote from: DavidW on July 30, 2014, 08:21:34 AM
I've been watching Longmire on Netflix watch instantly.  Really liking the show, good mysteries and characters.  None of that csi stupidity, and not a meandering soap either.  Just perfect.  At least for now.  I'm half way through the first season.



Anyone else watch the show?

I will give it a try.  I made it partly through the Justified series, but it became way too repetitive and the subplots never seemed to end.
There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Bogey

There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

Ken B

Quote from: Bogey on July 30, 2014, 08:28:09 AM
I will give it a try.  I made it partly through the Justified series, but it became way too repetitive and the subplots never seemed to end.
I lost interest when they dragged in the third subplot about how all the dumbass redneck crackers were too stupid to tie their shoes, and too ungrammatical to explain their difficulty.

DavidW

Quote from: Bogey on July 30, 2014, 08:28:09 AM
I will give it a try.  I made it partly through the Justified series, but it became way too repetitive and the subplots never seemed to end.

Yes completely different from that show then.  Longmire has self contained episodes, each one a mystery. 

mn dave

See the movie Cold in July!

Even if you've read the novel by Joe Lansdale.


DavidW

I started watching True Detective, liking it so far. 

mn dave


Bogey

The Mercenaries (1960, a.k.a. The Cutie / The Smashers) by Donald E. Westlake


There will never be another era like the Golden Age of Hollywood.  We didn't know how to blow up buildings then so we had no choice but to tell great stories with great characters.-Ben Mankiewicz

DavidW

I read Bear Island which is a whodunnit set on a small island south of Svarbard.  It was reminiscent of And Then There Were None by Agatha Christie:

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Same format but in Antartica, I read Dark Winter which I really enjoyed.

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If you got the theme, I'm taking a mental vacation from the heat.

Jo498

What are your Rex Stout Nero Wolfe favorites?

I only discovered this series a few months ago and I am quite fond of it, especially because Archie as narrator is so funny (not quite Bertie Wooster who was an inspiration but very good nevertheless). So far I have read. The mysteries are not as contrived (and unsolvable, e.g. I got the main twist in "Some buried Caesar" fairly early) as (to my recollection) many of Ellery Queen and Dickson Carr but for me that's actually a bonus.

So far I read:
Fer de Lance, League of frightened Gentlemen, Some buried Caesar, Black Orchids, Too many clients, Plot it yourself, The mother hunt, Death of a dude.

The last was (clearly) the weakest but I have not read enough to establish that "earlier=better". Should I go with the earlier ones first or are there particular favorites?


Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal