Worst looking CD/LP artwork

Started by Maciek, April 12, 2007, 03:04:53 PM

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KevinP

Quote from: T. D. on June 19, 2024, 12:44:58 PM

The way that title doesn't fit really bugs me.

(Love David Murray though.)


KevinP

Did we discuss these already?




Peter Power Pop

#4982
Quote from: KevinP on June 22, 2024, 06:36:37 AMDid we discuss these already?





We certainly did. But they're well worth revisiting.

KevinP

Thought I had seen them before.

steve ridgway

Quote from: Peter Power Pop on June 22, 2024, 04:35:46 PMWe certainly did. But they're well worth revisiting.

So these 8 symphonies are recorded in 8 bit sound? ;)

Brian

Another pixelated cover (that also suffers from poor color contrast between text and background):


Peter Power Pop

Quote from: Brian on June 23, 2024, 10:00:46 AMAnother pixelated cover (that also suffers from poor color contrast between text and background):



That's horrible.

DavidW

Quote from: Brian on June 23, 2024, 10:00:46 AMAnother pixelated cover (that also suffers from poor color contrast between text and background):



But I don't think it is a bad cover.  The individual pictures (zoom in if you don't know what I'm talking about) go along with the major work "signs of the seasons" and the effect of having them as elements of a portrait visually demonstrate the intimate nature of it as solo recorder music.

The background is dark enough that I don't have any problems with the contrast either.

KevinP

I've never held one of these low-res titles in my hand. They might look...cuter, for lack of a better word, than they do on a screen.

Probably not enough though.

Jo498

In the 1980, the earlyish days of computer graphics, pixellation was a way to be modern and "digital". Some of these covers were so cheesy that they were almost good and in any case it was excuseable at that time. But this doesn't apply to the Hartmann/Metzmacher covers...

Tout le malheur des hommes vient d'une seule chose, qui est de ne savoir pas demeurer en repos, dans une chambre.
- Blaise Pascal

steve ridgway

Quote from: Jo498 on June 23, 2024, 11:30:30 PMIn the 1980, the earlyish days of computer graphics, pixellation was a way to be modern and "digital". Some of these covers were so cheesy that they were almost good and in any case it was excuseable at that time. But this doesn't apply to the Hartmann/Metzmacher covers...



That would have been quite a good telescopic infrared image in the 80s ;) .


DavidW

It looks like the oregon trail in space! :laugh: For those of you who are either older or younger than me:


Madiel

Quote from: DavidW on June 23, 2024, 06:45:55 PMBut I don't think it is a bad cover.  The individual pictures (zoom in if you don't know what I'm talking about) go along with the major work "signs of the seasons" and the effect of having them as elements of a portrait visually demonstrate the intimate nature of it as solo recorder music.

The background is dark enough that I don't have any problems with the contrast either.

My problem is, the overall face ends up looking really, really creepy.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

KevinP

For all I know, a fine album, but the cover doesn't exactly shout, 'Bartok!'


pjme

#4994
It seems to be quite difficult to find some info on this pianist (1945-1984).
The close up portrait is indeed a bit unhappy for the Bartok cd - but he has an impressive, very characteristic face - moustache. Apparently Alice Neel painted him:




" There are a couple uniquely "San Francisco" things to look for. In the largest gallery space, we see portraits of all kinds, demonstrating the many different types of people the artist considered worthy of capturing forever on her canvas. She painted people of color, members of the LGBTQ+ community, Communist artist friends, single mothers, and others who were...well, "othered" by society. In this room, look for the 1971 portrait of Robert Hagopian, a San Francisco concert pianist and one of a number of young men dying of HIV/AIDS whom Neel painted; his parents acquired this painting after Alice Neel's death, to honor and grieve their son."Source: https://www.sartle.com/blog/post/alice-neels-people-come-first-de-young-museum-exhibitIn

1971, she met Robert Hagopian, who was visiting New York from San Francisco. Drawn to his face, Neel asked to paint him.But actually, it's not only Hagopian's face that she focused on here. She also devoted a lot of attention to his hands. Hagopian, then 26 years old, was a concert pianist.He was especially known for his interpretations of early 20th century piano music – you can hear him playing a piece by the Hungarian composer Bartok in the background.Hagopian died of AIDS while still in his thirties. His parents eventually came to own the painting. It's a powerful reminder of the strength and presence of their remarkably talented son - lost, like so many of his contemporaries, much too soon.

Sad.....

steve ridgway

Quote from: KevinP on July 01, 2024, 04:14:26 AMFor all I know, a fine album, but the cover doesn't exactly shout, 'Bartok!'



No, perhaps they've had to crop the photo to get rid of distracting elements ;) .


Madiel

Look it's CALLED Amateur Hour. The brief has been fulfilled.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

Peter Power Pop


KevinP

I need to get my glasses to read that.

Oh wait. They're already on.

AnotherSpin

Quote from: KevinP on July 01, 2024, 04:14:26 AMFor all I know, a fine album, but the cover doesn't exactly shout, 'Bartok!'



He looks like Frank Zappa after a haircut.