Author Topic: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)  (Read 13665 times)

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Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #60 on: June 24, 2020, 02:47:20 PM »
Thankfully, no one wins in this but the music itself and as long as you’re listening, then this is all that matters at the end of the day. 8)

I couldn't disagree with this.  0:)
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #61 on: July 30, 2020, 10:25:58 AM »
Copied over from the WAYLTN thread:
'Stihira' by Shchedrin.
'Hymn for the Millenary of the Christianisation of Russia'.
A marvellous work and my favourite composition of his apart from the 1st Symphony. It is very Russian Orthodox sounding (it is largely orchestral although the theme is initially hummed by the male cellists) and should appeal to admirers of Hovhaness and Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov' (Coronation Scene). It is bizarrely coupled with violin concertos by Glazunov and Prokofiev but the link must be Rostropovich for whom it was written. Much use of chimes and gongs. It lasts 22 mins:

"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Online Dry Brett Kavanaugh

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #62 on: July 30, 2020, 11:03:34 AM »
In March I heard that Ms. Mutter was infected with Covid-19. I hope she is getting better now.

Copied over from the WAYLTN thread:
'Stihira' by Shchedrin.
'Hymn for the Millenary of the Christianisation of Russia'.
A marvellous work and my favourite composition of his apart from the 1st Symphony. It is very Russian Orthodox sounding (it is largely orchestral although the theme is initially hummed by the male cellists) and should appeal to admirers of Hovhaness and Mussorgsky's 'Boris Godunov' (Coronation Scene). It is bizarrely coupled with violin concertos by Glazunov and Prokofiev but the link must be Rostropovich for whom it was written. Much use of chimes and gongs. It lasts 22 mins:



Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #63 on: July 30, 2020, 11:13:38 AM »
In March I heard that Ms. Mutter was infected with Covid-19. I hope she is getting better now.
Me too. She looks very young on the cover image.
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #64 on: April 30, 2021, 03:16:37 PM »
I'm listening to Anna Karenina, the full ballet right now and thoroughly loving it!  It's so routed in Russian tradition with equal parts Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovitch.  How could anyone not love this????  The work was composed from 1970-1 and I highly recommend it!  It's evocative, energetic, atmospheric and dramatic.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #65 on: April 30, 2021, 03:31:49 PM »
I'm listening to Anna Karenina, the full ballet right now and thoroughly loving it!  It's so routed in Russian tradition with equal parts Tchaikovsky, Prokofiev, and Shostakovitch.  How could anyone not love this????  The work was composed from 1970-1 and I highly recommend it!  It's evocative, energetic, atmospheric and dramatic.

Yes, it’s probably his most popular ballet, too. A fine work no doubt. I was less impressed with The Seagull as it felt kind of faceless. The Little Humpbacked Horse, the Carmen Suite and The Lady with the Lapdog were also quite good. I think I just listed all of his ballets...lol. Have you heard his Cello Concerto? I consider this one of his crowning achievements within all of the works I’ve heard so far, which has been many since I did a little survey of his music last year (or the year before). I haven’t really heard anything of his chamber music that is of interest and I still have yet to get around to his solo piano music.
"Humility is society's greatest misconception."

Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #66 on: May 01, 2021, 04:43:03 AM »
Yes, it’s probably his most popular ballet, too. A fine work no doubt. I was less impressed with The Seagull as it felt kind of faceless. The Little Humpbacked Horse, the Carmen Suite and The Lady with the Lapdog were also quite good. I think I just listed all of his ballets...lol. Have you heard his Cello Concerto? I consider this one of his crowning achievements within all of the works I’ve heard so far, which has been many since I did a little survey of his music last year (or the year before). I haven’t really heard anything of his chamber music that is of interest and I still have yet to get around to his solo piano music.

I haven't heard his cello concerto so will add to my list.  Have you heard piano concertos or symphonies?  I remember liking the earlier soviet era ones quite a bit.  Obviously the shadow of his predecessors looms large but that's not a bad thing.

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #67 on: May 01, 2021, 05:29:41 AM »
I haven't heard his cello concerto so will add to my list.  Have you heard piano concertos or symphonies?  I remember liking the earlier soviet era ones quite a bit.  Obviously the shadow of his predecessors looms large but that's not a bad thing.

I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!
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Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #68 on: May 03, 2021, 11:10:49 PM »
I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!
.
The stand-out work for me is Symphony No.1, of which I own both (AFAIK) recordings. Like you I was very disappointed by Symphony No.2. I wish that Chandos would record Symphony No.1
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #69 on: May 04, 2021, 04:58:33 AM »
I liked his Symphony No. 1 quite a bit, but I didn’t think much of Symphony No. 2. Is there another one? I have heard several of the piano concerti and I recall enjoying them, although I don’t think I’ve heard the latest one. He’s certainly a fascinating composer in that he works in many different styles. I particularly like all of his Concerti for Orchestra. There are several of these --- five in all, I believe. Check these out, too!

I believe there is a third symphony but quite a few years separate No. 2 and 3.

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #70 on: June 01, 2021, 06:13:43 PM »
I’ve been doing a somewhat mini-Shchedrin listening marathon and enjoying the experience immensely. I have decided for Cesar’s benefit to leave a little bit of feedback on his ballet The Humpbacked Horse besides just saying it was riveting (which, indeed, it was). :) One of the things that struck me in Act II was how there was definitely some Ravel Daphnis et Chloé influence in this particular act’s music. You can definitely hear it in the orchestration. I would say as a whole that The Humpbacked Horse is one of those fairy-tale ballets not too far removed from what Stravinsky was doing with say Le Baiser de la fée or Prokofiev’s Romeo & Juliet, which Daverz pointed out in the ‘Listening’ thread. But where it’s quite different is in the treatment of the rhythm, but also, of course, it’s harmonic content. Considering Shchedrin was quite a capable pianist himself, it’s no surprise that many of the twists found in this ballet are done so harmonically. Of course, this ballet is quite far removed from the more angsty excursions of his next full ballet Anna Karenina. I think this work overall would actually make a fine introduction to the composer. It’s accessible, easier on the ears but there are some nice twists here and there that lets you know that the composer is having a bit fun pulling some strings here and there with the music and where it takes the listener. So, in summary, you NEED this ballet in your collection, Cesar! Actually, anyone that’s a Russophile like I am, needs this ballet in their collection, IMHO.

Almost a year after your insightful post, I'm listening to this incomparably wonderful ballet (act I). Holy cow, what an extraordinary composition this is!! I'm astounded by how colourful and magical it sounds. As you say, there are some hints of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, but this work has distinctiveness of its own. Yet another striking find in this year.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #71 on: June 01, 2021, 06:51:44 PM »
Almost a year after your insightful post, I'm listening to this incomparably wonderful ballet (act I). Holy cow, what an extraordinary composition this is!! I'm astounded by how colourful and magical it sounds. As you say, there are some hints of Prokofiev and Stravinsky, but this work has distinctiveness of its own. Yet another striking find in this year.

Better late than never, my friend! I find Shchedrin a truly fascinating composer with a unique musical language. He is fully capable of writing avant-garde works, but he’s just as comfortable writing gorgeous works that just ooze with a heartfelt lyricism. After Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Weinberg and Schnittke, he must be counted as one of my favorites from Soviet Era Russia.
« Last Edit: June 01, 2021, 06:56:30 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline Roy Bland

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #72 on: June 01, 2021, 11:07:44 PM »
I believe there is a third symphony but quite a few years separate No. 2 and 3.
Sinfonia n. 3 op. 109 (2000)

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #73 on: June 02, 2021, 06:22:09 PM »
Better late than never, my friend! I find Shchedrin a truly fascinating composer with a unique musical language. He is fully capable of writing avant-garde works, but he’s just as comfortable writing gorgeous works that just ooze with a heartfelt lyricism. After Prokofiev, Shostakovich, Weinberg and Schnittke, he must be counted as one of my favorites from Soviet Era Russia.

Yes, fortunately it wasn't later! Today I relistened to it and I'm amazed by how consistently marvelous it is, I mean, I didn't feel any dull part at all, and the magic and spark are always there. I wouldn't be exaggerating if I considered it one of my all-time favorite ballets. A superlative work IMO. This composer definitely has a voice of his own, there is personality in his music.
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline Mirror Image

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #74 on: June 02, 2021, 06:46:22 PM »
Yes, fortunately it wasn't later! Today I relistened to it and I'm amazed by how consistently marvelous it is, I mean, I didn't feel any dull part at all, and the magic and spark are always there. I wouldn't be exaggerating if I considered it one of my all-time favorite ballets. A superlative work IMO. This composer definitely has a voice of his own, there is personality in his music.

I seem to be entering into a Delius phase, but as soon as I can, I want to revisit this ballet. Glad to hear your experience has been a positive one.
« Last Edit: June 02, 2021, 07:35:23 PM by Mirror Image »
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Offline relm1

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #75 on: October 21, 2021, 05:03:19 PM »
Many fans of Shchedrin here?  I am surprised to realized the 88 year old composer is still around and active.  His latest work was just from last year!  https://de.schott-music.com/shop/priklyucheniya-obez-yany-no446334.html

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #76 on: October 22, 2021, 03:11:49 PM »
Many fans of Shchedrin here?  I am surprised to realized the 88 year old composer is still around and active.  His latest work was just from last year!  https://de.schott-music.com/shop/priklyucheniya-obez-yany-no446334.html
Yes, I am - this work in particular:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

Offline Symphonic Addict

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #77 on: October 22, 2021, 06:36:29 PM »
Yes, I am - this work in particular:


One of the best 1sts, right, Jeffrey?  ;)
Give us something else; give us something new; for Heaven's sake give us something bad, so long as we feel we are alive and active and not just passive admirers of tradition!

Carl Nielsen

Offline vandermolen

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Re: Rodion Shchedrin (b. 1932)
« Reply #78 on: October 24, 2021, 01:37:23 AM »
One of the best 1sts, right, Jeffrey?  ;)
Oh yes Cesar!
 :)
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).