Last Movie You Watched

Started by Drasko, April 06, 2007, 07:51:03 AM

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Madiel

#36400
Quote from: Florestan on February 17, 2024, 05:29:24 AMSo are movies on Romanian TV channels. I think this is a point worth stressing: subtitling movies has a very positive impact on people's ability to speak and understand foreign languages, while dubbing them is guaranteed to hinder such ability. I can offer only anecdotal evidence, but in France, where movies are dubbed, I mostly heard English spoken with such a French accent and in such a French pronunciation, even by highly educated people, as to render it painfully comic or comically painful for me to hear it*. On the contrary, in The Netherlands movies are subtitled and I found that Dutch janitors and bus drivers speak English with a better accent and pronunciation than French professors (French janitors and bus drivers, as a rule, speak nothing but French). Besides, movies being subtitled greatly helped me to learn Dutch.

* I noticed a similar phenomenon in Spain.


It also makes a difference to the quality of performances. Give me the original performance with subtitles rather than dubbing into English. Every time.

My family has always been perfectly happy with subtitles. My mother even more so now, as she has hearing difficulties. A foreign language film puts her on equal footing with the rest of the audience.

Maybe this is also because I've been watching SBS for decades, a channel absolutely dedicated to subtitles, and who do it with pretty high quality. With languages that I know a bit, I do sometimes see that other sources don't always have great subtitles.
I am now working on a discography of the works of Vagn Holmboe. Please visit and also contribute!

SimonNZ



I was nowhere near as impressed by this as many others have told me they were.

vers la flamme

Quote from: SimonNZ on February 17, 2024, 01:43:28 PM

I was nowhere near as impressed by this as many others have told me they were.

"Era-defining masterpiece" is no doubt a stretch. I didn't like it either, but the first 10 minutes or so of the movie were quite horrifying.

Watched some of Sergey Bondarchuk's War and Peace adaptation from the 1960s. Impression: quite impressively faithful to the book; beautiful cinematography, costumes, and set design; but the actors playing the main characters and (especially) the soldiers are far too old. The film portrayed the rank and file as being a bunch of old men with gray mustaches, which is quite at odds with the descriptions the book gives us of these vast infantry and hussar regiments being made up almost entirely of teenagers and twenty-somethings. Suspending my disbelief at this casting choice, I am enjoying it so far.

DavidW

Quote from: vers la flamme on February 18, 2024, 03:54:14 PM"Era-defining masterpiece" is no doubt a stretch. I didn't like it either, but the first 10 minutes or so of the movie were quite horrifying.

Yeah the first ten minutes are riveting and then I was so disappointed with the rest being a rehash of The Wicker Man.  I know there is a little more depth than that but the critics way overhyped it.

A couple years after I saw it in the theater, I rewatched it with grounded expectations and then it was fine.  Not great, but not bad either.  I think Heredity was a better horror movie from Aster.  I haven't seen Beau is Afraid.

vandermolen

Yesterday (at the cinema). A fine and very moving film:
"Courage is going from failure to failure without losing enthusiasm" (Churchill).

'The test of a work of art is, in the end, our affection for it, not our ability to explain why it is good' (Stanley Kubrick).

71 dB

Quote from: Florestan on February 17, 2024, 05:29:24 AMSo are movies on Romanian TV channels. I think this is a point worth stressing: subtitling movies has a very positive impact on people's ability to speak and understand foreign languages, while dubbing them is guaranteed to hinder such ability.
That is true. For me the thought of watching movies dubbed is horrendous: The voices are not actors' own voices? Harrison Ford sounds like a German or French dude? Ugh!  :o

Quote from: Florestan on February 17, 2024, 05:29:24 AMI can offer only anecdotal evidence, but in France, where movies are dubbed, I mostly heard English spoken with such a French accent and in such a French pronunciation, even by highly educated people, as to render it painfully comic or comically painful for me to hear it. I noticed a similar phenomenon in Spain.
Listening to Germans and French people speak English is cool thanks to the thick accent. That said, it not as all Finns spoke English without strong accent. We have this term "Rally English" (rallienglanti), because for some reason Finnish rally drivers speak English so clumsily it puts French people into shame!  :D


Quote from: Florestan on February 17, 2024, 05:29:24 AMOn the contrary, in The Netherlands movies are subtitled and I found that Dutch janitors and bus drivers speak English with a better accent and pronunciation than French professors (French janitors and bus drivers, as a rule, speak nothing but French). Besides, movies being subtitled greatly helped me to learn Dutch.

Dutch happens to be very close to English language. They say for native English speakers, the easiest foreign language to learn is Dutch. No wonder English is easy to learn for Dutch people! Finnish language on the other hand is pretty far from English. They say Finnish language is (a bit) closer to Japanese language than English! For example in Japanese language questions are formed by adding "-ka" (か) to end of the sentence (end of the verb which in Japanese language is in the end of the sentence) while in Finnish you add "-ko" or "-kö" to the end of the verb (we need two options because of vowel harmony common in agglutinative languages).
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

71 dB

I have watched the Scanners movie "trilogy." The first movie is course is from 1981 by David Cronenberg and the other two are from 1991 and directed by Christian Duguay. Cronenberg's original movie is superior (of course). As for the other two, I prefer the third movie. It was more entertaining, funnier to watch. This was a Swedish Blu-ray release with the 1991 movies as bonus. All three movies (307 minutes in all) are on one Blu-ray disc and the bitrate isn't very high. The picture quality, especially in the first one, is however good enough (for low budged body horror at least).

Cronenberg is a director I have got interested about only in the recent years. I like his visual style which reminds me of George Lucas. If we forget about the differences in the subject matter, Cronenberg's movies have a similar visual vibe to Lucas' THX 1138 in my opinion. A tendency of making the director "technically disappear" and instead concentrate on what happens in the story. The movies come alive in editing rather than while filming.
Spatial distortion is a serious problem deteriorating headphone listening.
Crossfeeders reduce spatial distortion and make the sound more natural
and less tiresome in headphone listening.

My Sound Cloud page <-- NEW Jan. 2024 "Harpeggiator"

Florestan



The quantity of anachronistic nonsense in this movie is staggering. I regret wasting two hours of my life on this crap.

This review is spot on: https://www.city-journal.org/article/minor-in-a-major-key-joseph-bologne

Why should be elite, music? Excuse me. Music must be for everybody. — Luciano Pavarotti

Papy Oli

King Kong (1933)



A first watch. Terrifyingly good, given when it was made. I can't imagine the reactions of the cinema audience at the time.  ??? 
Olivier

SimonNZ



Stopped this half way through. Some of the poorest first-draft throw-nothing-out sounding dialogue I've heard anywhere. And this from the guy who endlessly preens as being Mr Dialogue.

I was also highly disappointed that after persuading a score out of Morricone (and his last score at that) he still felt the need to have one stretch set instead to a White Stripes tune. Because he's still Mr Pop Soundtrack.

Karl Henning

Quote from: SimonNZ on February 23, 2024, 12:53:54 PM

Stopped this half way through. Some of the poorest first-draft throw-nothing-out sounding dialogue I've heard anywhere. And this from the guy who endlessly preens as being Mr Dialogue.

I was also highly disappointed that after persuading a score out of Morricone (and his last score at that) he still felt the need to have one stretch set instead to a White Stripes tune. Because he's still Mr Pop Soundtrack.
A little Schedenfreude because, while there are Tarantino movies I do enjoy, those which I have not enjoyed, wore the time notably ill and I have felt that he is unjustifiably lionized.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Roasted Swan

Quote from: Florestan on February 23, 2024, 03:32:47 AM

The quantity of anachronistic nonsense in this movie is staggering. I regret wasting two hours of my life on this crap.

This review is spot on: https://www.city-journal.org/article/minor-in-a-major-key-joseph-bologne



I must admit I've avoided this film - the article you reference is quite the demolition of both the film and the myth it propogates........

Florestan

#36412
Quote from: Roasted Swan on February 23, 2024, 11:09:44 PMI must admit I've avoided this film - the article you reference is quite the demolition of both the film

The film is an uninterrupted parade of fabrications, from the opening scene (Bologne defeating Mozart in an ad hoc violin contest) to the closing piece of "information" (Napoleon banned Bologne's music). There are only two true things in the movie: Bologne existed and was an exceptional fencer. Just about everything else is a lie. Wish I had read the review before watching it --- it would have spared me the time I wasted on the movie.

Quoteand the myth it propogates........

I had listened to Bologne's music long before watching the movie. It's enjoyable and pleasant to the ear, just as everything from the Classical era is, but nothing to write home about.
Why should be elite, music? Excuse me. Music must be for everybody. — Luciano Pavarotti

LKB

Quote from: Florestan on February 23, 2024, 11:51:49 PMThe film is an uninterrupted parade of fabrications, from the opening scene (Bologne defeating Mozart in an ad hoc violin contest) to the closing piece of "information" (Napoleon banned Bologne's music). There are only two true things in the movie: Bologne existed and was an exceptional fencer. Just about everything else is a lie. Wish I had read the review before watching it --- it would have spared me the time I wasted on the movie.

I had listened to Bologne's music long before watching the movie. It's enjoyable and pleasant to the ear, just as everything from the Classical era is, but nothing to write home about.

So it would seem that the film is largely... baloney?  >:D
Mit Flügeln, die ich mir errungen...

Florestan

Quote from: LKB on Today at 02:48:58 AMSo it would seem that the film is largely... baloney?  >:D

Big time so, yes.
Why should be elite, music? Excuse me. Music must be for everybody. — Luciano Pavarotti

Cato

A tension-filled drama with a hair-raising finale, thanks to Jack Elam!


Tyrone Power and Hugh Marlowe, the latter playing a rather calm sociopath:





Also: hard to believe this movie is 35 years old!


"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Karl Henning

Quote from: Cato on Today at 03:02:37 PMAlso: hard to believe this movie is 35 years old!



I'll say! Although it's really Hoffmann's show, probably one of Cruise's best performances.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot

Cato

Quote from: Florestan on February 23, 2024, 03:32:47 AM

The quantity of anachronistic nonsense in this movie is staggering. I regret wasting two hours of my life on this crap.

This review is spot on: https://www.city-journal.org/article/minor-in-a-major-key-joseph-bologne




I sensed from certain reviews that it was a fantasy movie!



Quote from: Papy Oli on February 23, 2024, 03:54:01 AMKing Kong (1933)



A first watch. Terrifyingly good, given when it was made. I can't imagine the reactions of the cinema audience at the time.  ??? 


I first saw it in 1955 on a television set typical for that time (i.e. small).

I was HOOKED!!!  8)

And even as a child, I sensed that Robert Armstrong dominates the movie as much as King Kong!  He sells the possibility that what you are seeing is real!

From what I have read, some people did faint at the theaters back in 1933!



Speaking of (possibly terrible) movies, Werner Herzog sat through 30 minutes of Oscar-nominated Barbie:


Quote

...""I have not seen Oppenheimer yet, but with Barbie I managed to see the first half hour. I wanted to watch it because I was curious, and I still don't have an answer, but I have a suspicion," he said. "Could it be that the world of Barbie is sheer hell? As for a movie ticket, as an audience, you can witness sheer hell as close as it gets."




To be sure, Werner Herzog admits he has not seen the whole movie (c. 2  1/2 hours!), so...maybe it gets better?


https://faroutmagazine.co.uk/werner-herzog-calls-barbie-movie-sheer-hell/
"Meet Miss Ruth Sherwood, from Columbus, Ohio, the Middle of the Universe!"

- Brian Aherne introducing Rosalind Russell in  My Sister Eileen (1942)

Karl Henning

Quote from: Cato on Today at 04:30:42 PMI have not seen Oppenheimer yet ....
My PT had a spare DVD of Oppenheimer which he's given me, and I shall watch sometime this week.
Karl Henning, Ph.D.
Composer & Clarinetist
Boston MA
http://www.karlhenning.com/
[Matisse] was interested neither in fending off opposition,
nor in competing for the favor of wayward friends.
His only competition was with himself. — Françoise Gilot